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Thread: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

  1. #1

    Default Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    I'm interesting to have a trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou, anyone have any good suggestion or any experience to share???


    Thanks..

  2. #2

    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    I went before christmas. Good weather with sun but was cold. very few people so good to take photo. no rush.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    Hi abc0455,

    Wow.. thats great so you went there with tour or backpack??

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    Singapore got flight to Jiu Zhai Gou, transit in Chengdu. It is very easy to arrange backpacking tour.
    As I know, Jiu Zhai Gou will close plank road in winter.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    Quote Originally Posted by newdonkey View Post
    Singapore got flight to Jiu Zhai Gou, transit in Chengdu. It is very easy to arrange backpacking tour.
    As I know, Jiu Zhai Gou will close plank road in winter.
    Hi newdonkey, thanks for the info.

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    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    Arrange a backpack group...maybe blu will follow. Not happy with the tour there last year. The time allocated by the tour was way too short.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    Quote Originally Posted by Blu-By-U View Post
    Arrange a backpack group...maybe blu will follow. Not happy with the tour there last year. The time allocated by the tour was way too short.
    There is travel fair for Jiu Zhai Gou going on at Raffles City right now. The cost for a 10 days trip is about $2k... maybe can also ask about cost of backpack

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    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    Heaven on earth man...I went there for 2 seasons in 2 years already...this year might be going for spring or autumn season...very nice place.

    What is your primary concerns for the trip? Travel advice or photography advice?

  9. #9

    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    Quote Originally Posted by Maltese View Post
    Heaven on earth man...I went there for 2 seasons in 2 years already...this year might be going for spring or autumn season...very nice place.

    What is your primary concerns for the trip? Travel advice or photography advice?
    Hi Maltese, my major concerns is travel advice but also wish to hear some of photography advice since the weather there is bit different as here..

    Blu-By-U, I plan to go this coming autumn , heard that is the best season to catch some nice shooting...

    Thanks everyone for your advise and suggestion.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    Quote Originally Posted by philshots View Post
    There is travel fair for Jiu Zhai Gou going on at Raffles City right now. The cost for a 10 days trip is about $2k... maybe can also ask about cost of backpack
    Hey philshots, thanks for the update too. Will take a trip down and have a look look see see...

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    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    Quote Originally Posted by happyflic View Post
    Hi Maltese, my major concerns is travel advice
    Winter is the worst time to go because of the snowing...the journey up to JZG is already tedious...if it snow or too thick, plane won't fly and buses can't run. Summer as well as other seasons are better but u risk rain as well as altitude sickness.

    If u r going to autumn, it will be packed with people. My summer trip end up mostly in telephoto shots more than wide angles....because there are so many people around.

    If u can, try to carry less things, removeable jackets because in high altitudes it can be cold. Even in Summer when temp is the highest we get about a 10+ degree C only. But once u r in the sun u will get sun burn very fast because u r 3000m nearer to the sun. So whenever u r in the shades, wear your jacket. Out in the sun, remove it. Any other season besides summer bring your winter clothings.

    One thing bad about taking plane up there is u get less time for your body to adjust to the thin oxygen level. Up there water will not boil and can never reach 100 degree C which u end up with lukewarm food and drinks.

    I will train up abit on the lung thingy before going for a photo trip because u will be carrying more things up instead of leisure tour there. Once u r there, slow down your pace of living...i.e talk slower, walk slower, breath slower but deeper etc. The more u get aggitated or excited, the less oxygen u wasted. Many go there without enjoying the views because it get sick easily.

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    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    happyflic,
    sorry to hijack.. but i want to find out about travel advice for going jiu zhai gou too... anyone has any recommendations for travel agencies (both local and china ones)? i'm looking for something that will allow time to fully explore the area, but isn't too taxing.. coz my parents are going and i don't think they can survive backpacking...

    thanks in advance!
    Canon EOS 30D w/ grip 580EX, Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8, EF-S 10-22mm
    :bsmilie:

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    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    can give the tour agency name here or not? Anyway I did both because the tour package is very cheap and after that I extend the stay for about 1 week heading east with a China agency.

    What u can do is go to a SG specialised China tour agencies, there isn't a lot in SG also....usually these agencies should have a specialised department and hotline to handle these tours. U need to compare the price because it can varies alot in terms of meals and acommodation. In Chengdu its usually 4 stars hotels. Bear in mind 4 stars in China is like our budget hotels. Also 4 stars in different cities have different standards. Beijing 4 stars is nice

    Try to ask where your hotel is in Chengdu. Those nearer to the business area u can shop shop during your free and easy. I like their carrefour to stock up trekking food sources. Your package should at least consist of the steamboat as well as the chinese medicine feast at bao shu tang. Those are good. For the former, be prepared to get sick and vomit because its super duper spicy but nice and tasty. Most likely they will arrange at the end of the trip and even u LS u LS on airport, plane or back in SG liao. The latter they will ask u to buy "gou yo" before u can eat, its in a very famous china medicine hall.


    Once u reach the perfecture of JZG which is Ah Ba Zhou, u should be looking at a 5 stars hotel like Sheraton, Jiu Zhai Tian Tang (9 clans heaven), Jia Bo Gu Cheng (Jia Bo Old City). Usually the agencies will boast their hotel one. Because the trip is tiring, a bad hotel stay is the last thing u want to have.

    Actually most prestigious SG agencies will almost certainly get u into one of the 3 because all 3 of these hotels hosted cultural shows at night where the entrance fee is not cheap. So end up u still have to folk out a significant sum. If u want to know what shows are they, I've video down both shows, can show u some shots. The one at Jia bo is most worth it - the show was said to have the biggest indoor stage in the world where live horses can dashed across not stay there stationary one hor.

    In order to minimise the travelling in ah ba zhou, which is the most jialat one, stay in Sheraton better, because JZG is nearer. I think mostly 5 mins will reach. If u stay in Jiu Zhai Tian Tang or Jia Bo Gu Cheng, good luck, the car will have to go through a series of curves if I remember correctly, 8 or 18 of them. Now the curves are not just simple curves. The curves are big curves with altitude difference and if u are already not feeling well, u will really vomit and have head tearing like my tour mates...all young and old all vomit in the bus moaning. (Maybe all those that I've encountered all not very healthy one)

    If u r travelling with parents, I suggest u do a health check with them first before u depart. Because either u r travelling by road or air, when u r up at ah ba zhou (perfecture where JZG is) u r most certainly going to get highland effect - oxygen is thin. Plane is worst, because 45 mins later, the altitude is going from -100 (chengdu is under sea level) to over 2000 - 3000 m. If u take bus, which I think takes about 17 hrs, the rise is gradual. Tour package without the plane will be significantly cheaper.


    My first China tour agency - Young people china tours or something like that, the tour guide got introduce a chinese medicine which helps your body to absorb more O2. The 2nd one call Panda agency never. In either case all my parents and myself dun need but all most of our tour members kana headache, vomit, giddy, muscle pain etc. Those who have go before will have experience. In case u kana, then become no fun liao. So before u leave with your parents, try to get them exercise a bit.

    Ok, enough of the bad part....so, if u ever go up there healthy, feel ok? U will be rewarded by the heaven - provided it don't get spoilt by the swamps of tourists blocking your view. The sky, water, soil, flowers, fishes and air is heavenly. I suppose the people staying there live in heaven every seconds of their lives.

    Lastly, if possible, get either a 2nd camera, more batteries and films or cards. Because u will really find everywhere is worth a picture of its own. All my digital gears are in working order even in winter but just in case, u never know

  14. #14
    Senior Member yyD70S's Avatar
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    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    Many thanks to all for sharing

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    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    u r welcome...we will be expecting more works from u people.

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    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    well, where-ever you go that is of a high altitude, always remember not to under-estimate altitude sickness, i have NS friends who climbed Mt. Fuji with me a couple of years ago and ended up like dogs cause they under-estimated altitude sickness and believe they're fit enough to take it.

    You really wouldnt want to experience the immense headache due to lack of oxygen which causes your brain to swell up and press against your skull

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    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    1. Hydration – Always stay thoroughly hydrated on any hike, but particularly those involving travel above 7,000’ elevation. Keep urine colorless and drink before you get thirsty, as thirst usually occurs only after you are already dehydrated. This means try to drink at least 6-8 ounces every 30-45 minutes on hot summer days when you are going uphill carrying a heavy pack. Camelback hydration systems can be helpful in always having a water source nearby, but you can also clip Nalgene water bottles to a shoulder strap so you can grab a drink without having to stop and dig into your pack. At elevations above 10,000’ be sure to have an insulating tube to protect the Camelback from freezing, and carry a spare empty Nalgene in case your system freezes, so you still have access to beverage.

    2. Thermoregulation – keep watch on your body’s core temperature as extreme perspiration can sap your energy faster than you realize. When climbing something like Mt. Rainier where there is snow readily available, try wrapping some in a bandana and applying the compress frequently to your forehead to help you cool down; if you carry extra water, a little on your forehead (or from streams as you encounter them) can feel especially refreshing. Be sure to wear light colored (beige, gray or white) clothing in hot summer months and darker colors (blue or black) in cold months to absorb or repel sunlight. Dress in layers so you can discard or add clothing to stay comfortable as you hike.

    3. Eat regularly – Whether you feel like it or not, you must keep eating. Your body works hard to go uphill and carry extra weight; if you are traveling at altitude the stresses on your body are even greater and you probably will feel less interested in food. Be sure to test snack and meal food ahead of time at sea level and only take with you whatever is palatable and satisfying down low, minus spicy or hard-to-chew foods. Include carbohydrate solutions to add to your beverages such as Powerade, Cytomax or Gatorade. Have some hard candy, jelly beans, lemon drops or Gu packets handy so you have ready access to your main fuel source: carbohydrates.

    4. Pressure Breathing – Learn how you can use and benefit from this technique any time you start to feel a bit nauseous above about 7,500 feet. Since the atmospheric pressure changes the higher you go, it becomes increasingly difficult to get the oxygen you need into your lungs. By pursing your lips and exhaling forcefully and fully, you let the carbon dioxide in your lungs escape, allowing for a more ready exchange with oxygen in the “thinner air.” At the first sign of nausea, take some water, switch to pressure breathing for a few paces, and incorporate the Rest Step (see below) and you will in all likelihood start to feel a lot better.

    5. Rest Step – Anytime you start to feel a bit nauseous, you may want to transition into the “rest step,” a method of hiking that allows the skeleton to take the brunt of the weight rather than the muscles. Lock out the bottom leg as you shift one leg up hill, pause in a full rest position, then transfer the weight to the other leg, lock out the new bottom leg and pause. In this way you avoid the “hurry and wait” gait of inexperienced climbers and find a comfortable rhythm that you can sustain indefinitely.

    6. Slow your pace – In order to enable you to continue steadily, listen carefully to your body and be sure to start out a little slower than you normally go to warm up well and hit your stride. If you try to push it to keep up with the fastest member of your party you may not make it to your goal. In the case of altitude climbing, the tortoise usually outpaces the hare in the long run, but the key is to go at a slow and steady pace that enables you to go continuously with very few rest stops.

    7. Acclimatize – Plan to spend an extra day or night above 5000’ if you can. On a climb of Mt. Rainier, for example, staying at the lodge at Paradise or camping in the basin on the way up to Camp Schurman can help enormously with acclimatization. Instead of racing up to 9,500 (Camp Schurman) or 10,150 (Camp Muir) on day one and trying to summit the very next day, allowing yourself three days for the trip makes it far more enjoyable.

    8. Aspirin or Tylenol – Please note that this page is not meant to provide medical advice, and you should always consult your physician before embarking on any strenuous training regimen. However, many climbers have found that at the onset of their high-altitude climbs, taking some aspirin or other pain-relief medication as a preventative measure against headaches can be beneficial.

    9. Proper Conditioning – Be sure to include interval training, appropriate over-weight pack hiking, and strength training in your conditioning program (see www.bodyresults.com/E2intervals.asp and www.bodyresults.com/p1rainier.asp for far more on how to properly prepare the body for your climb).

    10. Altitude medicines – As a last resort, if you have had trouble at altitude in the past or you wish to be prepared for any scenario, talk to your physician about a prescription for appropriate high-altitude medications (such as Diamox). Gingko biloba is a supplement that some people have found to be effective as well.

  18. #18
    Senior Member zoossh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    Quote Originally Posted by ReiszRie View Post
    1. Hydration – Always stay thoroughly hydrated on any hike, but particularly those involving travel above 7,000’ elevation. Keep urine colorless and drink before you get thirsty, as thirst usually occurs only after you are already dehydrated. This means try to drink at least 6-8 ounces every 30-45 minutes on hot summer days when you are going uphill carrying a heavy pack. Camelback hydration systems can be helpful in always having a water source nearby, but you can also clip Nalgene water bottles to a shoulder strap so you can grab a drink without having to stop and dig into your pack. At elevations above 10,000’ be sure to have an insulating tube to protect the Camelback from freezing, and carry a spare empty Nalgene in case your system freezes, so you still have access to beverage.

    2. Thermoregulation – keep watch on your body’s core temperature as extreme perspiration can sap your energy faster than you realize. When climbing something like Mt. Rainier where there is snow readily available, try wrapping some in a bandana and applying the compress frequently to your forehead to help you cool down; if you carry extra water, a little on your forehead (or from streams as you encounter them) can feel especially refreshing. Be sure to wear light colored (beige, gray or white) clothing in hot summer months and darker colors (blue or black) in cold months to absorb or repel sunlight. Dress in layers so you can discard or add clothing to stay comfortable as you hike.

    3. Eat regularly – Whether you feel like it or not, you must keep eating. Your body works hard to go uphill and carry extra weight; if you are traveling at altitude the stresses on your body are even greater and you probably will feel less interested in food. Be sure to test snack and meal food ahead of time at sea level and only take with you whatever is palatable and satisfying down low, minus spicy or hard-to-chew foods. Include carbohydrate solutions to add to your beverages such as Powerade, Cytomax or Gatorade. Have some hard candy, jelly beans, lemon drops or Gu packets handy so you have ready access to your main fuel source: carbohydrates.

    4. Pressure Breathing – Learn how you can use and benefit from this technique any time you start to feel a bit nauseous above about 7,500 feet. Since the atmospheric pressure changes the higher you go, it becomes increasingly difficult to get the oxygen you need into your lungs. By pursing your lips and exhaling forcefully and fully, you let the carbon dioxide in your lungs escape, allowing for a more ready exchange with oxygen in the “thinner air.” At the first sign of nausea, take some water, switch to pressure breathing for a few paces, and incorporate the Rest Step (see below) and you will in all likelihood start to feel a lot better.

    5. Rest Step – Anytime you start to feel a bit nauseous, you may want to transition into the “rest step,” a method of hiking that allows the skeleton to take the brunt of the weight rather than the muscles. Lock out the bottom leg as you shift one leg up hill, pause in a full rest position, then transfer the weight to the other leg, lock out the new bottom leg and pause. In this way you avoid the “hurry and wait” gait of inexperienced climbers and find a comfortable rhythm that you can sustain indefinitely.

    6. Slow your pace – In order to enable you to continue steadily, listen carefully to your body and be sure to start out a little slower than you normally go to warm up well and hit your stride. If you try to push it to keep up with the fastest member of your party you may not make it to your goal. In the case of altitude climbing, the tortoise usually outpaces the hare in the long run, but the key is to go at a slow and steady pace that enables you to go continuously with very few rest stops.

    7. Acclimatize – Plan to spend an extra day or night above 5000’ if you can. On a climb of Mt. Rainier, for example, staying at the lodge at Paradise or camping in the basin on the way up to Camp Schurman can help enormously with acclimatization. Instead of racing up to 9,500 (Camp Schurman) or 10,150 (Camp Muir) on day one and trying to summit the very next day, allowing yourself three days for the trip makes it far more enjoyable.

    8. Aspirin or Tylenol – Please note that this page is not meant to provide medical advice, and you should always consult your physician before embarking on any strenuous training regimen. However, many climbers have found that at the onset of their high-altitude climbs, taking some aspirin or other pain-relief medication as a preventative measure against headaches can be beneficial.

    9. Proper Conditioning – Be sure to include interval training, appropriate over-weight pack hiking, and strength training in your conditioning program (see www.bodyresults.com/E2intervals.asp and www.bodyresults.com/p1rainier.asp for far more on how to properly prepare the body for your climb).

    10. Altitude medicines – As a last resort, if you have had trouble at altitude in the past or you wish to be prepared for any scenario, talk to your physician about a prescription for appropriate high-altitude medications (such as Diamox). Gingko biloba is a supplement that some people have found to be effective as well.
    gd write-up. incorporating into my thread at http://www.clubsnap.org/forums/showthread.php?p=2682203

  19. #19

    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    i went last year , off peak but snowing (ard mar) , just wear gloves , weather clothes , more socks. and fisherman ' s friend

  20. #20

    Default Re: Any trip to China Jiu Zhai Gou???

    I have been there....and I wish I can go back again

    It is so nice lor...even in winter

    I went in late nov, winter which they have everything discounted...i paid 800 or 900 rmb for the local tour package by zhong qing nian luyou...cheap but that was the price I paid in 2004.

    If you depart chengdu by coach it is even cheaper...but journey is 10hrs single way.

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