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Thread: Selling images for stock.

  1. #1
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    Default Selling images for stock.

    Selling images for stock.

    I am curious how it is done, who to approach, the kind of price it will fetch.

    Not that I am good enough, but simply just curious.

    Anyone has any experiences?
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Selling images for stock.

    Originally posted by Freed
    Selling images for stock.

    I am curious how it is done, who to approach, the kind of price it will fetch.

    Not that I am good enough, but simply just curious.

    Anyone has any experiences?
    Lots of exp here

    Most stock agencies work pretty much the same way when all is said and done and in order to give you an insight in to the stock business I'll run throgh the entire process from a photographers perspective.

    Making stock shots

    Most agencies require at least 100 and more often 200-300 images to get on their books. This might not sound like much BUT you are going to have to have that many at hand before you approach an agency.

    Furthermore most agencies require a minimum number of additonal images per year. Typical figures are 300-500 images per annum.

    Format:
    3000 x 2000 pixels or thereabouts (3000 x 1900 etc) is the industry standard size for most stock photography if it's going to the agent in a digital format from a D-SLR. If you are scanning in images yourself the most common format size is 3000x2000 @300 dpi.

    Tif and PCX are the standard image file formats.

    Otherwise you hand over your Chromes or film and they will scan it for you.

    Accompanying each Image
    For shots of individual people, small groups and private buildings a model release or building release is required for each image. This contains the models name, address, telephone number and a signature stating they give permission for the photograph to be used commercially for stock photography. It should be noted that a release doesn't stop you being sued if the owner doesn't like what the image was used for (ie deragotory or similar use) but it does allow a general legal protection. Most agencies have a pro-forma release for their country of operation.

    Plants, animals etc. Most agencies like the latin and common names of the plants and animals to accompany each shot.

    The sales process
    Once you on the books or an agency your work is added to their catalogue, this can be either online or in book form. Prospective purchasers then view the images and if they like the image they start discussions with the agency over the cost of the shot.

    The final sale price is largely determined by the rarity of the shot, and the type of license the client is interested in. For example, a license to use a single shot for a single purpose use that allows the image to be sold to other clients is normally about as cheap as a license comes. While an unlimited use 5 year exclusive rights contract is worth serious money if the purchaser is a large coporation who want the shot for long term use.

    Agency Commission
    Agencies aren't charities, most agencies pay between 50 and 80% of the sale price to the photographer with 65-70% being normal. In some cases higher rates may be paid, but it's pretty rare to see less than 20% go to the agent.

    Paying the Photographer
    Firstly you are only paid for shots that are sold. No agency pays for every shot you send in. Depending on the number of your shots that sell payment can be monthly, quarterly, 6 monthly or yearly.

    Finding an Agency
    Look in the Yellow pages and run a few websearches. Shopping around is the key, you need an agency you are really happy to deal with, not one you aren't happy with.

    Hope that gives you an insight in to the stock photo industry.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  3. #3
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    Default

    mind sharing what photo agencies you have been dealing with?
    Thanks.

  4. #4
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    Default

    My business supplies several agencies based in Australia, Europe, USA and Japan.

    If you do a net search you'll find many agencies including several in Singapore.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  5. #5
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    Default

    I never thought it will be so complicated and tedious. I thought it would be possible to sell just several images to the company that manages the stock images

    I am just ignorant....
    Flickr :: Alpha 850 :: 50F1.4 :: 28-75F2.8 :: 17-35F2.8 ::

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