Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Aperture priority

  1. #1

    Default Aperture priority

    Was wondering if anyone could help me. I have a Nikon F4 camera. I'm not sure how the aperture priority works because if i set the aperture to say f/16, i get a much darker image which is not what i want. But i have no choice since i want to a greater depth of view. I understand that with the aperture priority, the shutter speed is controlled by the camera. But if thats the case, how does the camera know how much exposure i want?

    Sorry if my terms may not sound correct, i just started on film photography.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Legion
    Posts
    7,751

    Default Re: Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by jansenaw View Post
    Was wondering if anyone could help me. I have a Nikon F4 camera. I'm not sure how the aperture priority works because if i set the aperture to say f/16, i get a much darker image which is not what i want. But i have no choice since i want to a greater depth of view. I understand that with the aperture priority, the shutter speed is controlled by the camera. But if thats the case, how does the camera know how much exposure i want?

    Sorry if my terms may not sound correct, i just started on film photography.
    let say the camera will give you a exposure of 0EV, if you want it darker you can do it by decreasing the EV compensation let say -1EV, the same goes for increase.

    and yes, the camera doesn't know the exposure you want, and so you will have to roughly guess it unlike digital where you can see a preview before increasing/decreasing the EV.

  3. #3
    Account Suspended
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    I love my cup & coaster!
    Posts
    754

    Default Re: Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by jansenaw View Post
    Was wondering if anyone could help me. I have a Nikon F4 camera. I'm not sure how the aperture priority works because if i set the aperture to say f/16, i get a much darker image which is not what i want. But i have no choice since i want to a greater depth of view. I understand that with the aperture priority, the shutter speed is controlled by the camera. But if thats the case, how does the camera know how much exposure i want?

    Sorry if my terms may not sound correct, i just started on film photography.
    The camera meters off the film to get the exposure. To get a greater depth of view, you can use hyperfocal focusing. This way even at f/2.8 you'll achieve a great depth of view.

    Aperture priority sets the shutter based on the aperture value you selected. The camera itself does not know what exposure you intend it for, it will only attempt to achieve mid-grey exposure for the frame itself as that's what it's programmed for.

    You as the photographer will need to tell the camera how and what to expose for.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    130

    Default Re: Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by jansenaw View Post
    Was wondering if anyone could help me. I have a Nikon F4 camera. I'm not sure how the aperture priority works because if i set the aperture to say f/16, i get a much darker image which is not what i want. But i have no choice since i want to a greater depth of view. I understand that with the aperture priority, the shutter speed is controlled by the camera. But if thats the case, how does the camera know how much exposure i want?

    Sorry if my terms may not sound correct, i just started on film photography.
    Hi jansenaw,

    the camera's meter will determine what is, TECHNICALLY, the optimal exposure (aperture and shutter speed) based on what ISO film you have loaded.

    You then have a choice of the following:

    1. Shutter priority: You choose the shutter speed, the camera decides the aperture size. The final exposure will equal the camera's recommendation.

    2. Aperture priority: You choose the aperture size, the camera decides the shutter speed. The final exposure will equal the camera's recommendation.

    3. Program mode: This will, of course, be the camera's original recommendation.

    4. Manual mode: You decide both, and can over-ride the camera's recommendation.

    Please note, that the exposure recommended by the camera is only what the computer thinks is TECHNICALLY correct based on it's programming. Sometimes, "technically correct" exposures are not what you want. If that's the case, it's time to use options 1, 2 or 4 above.

    The image you see through a view-finder is one that is at maximum aperture. The aperture you/the camera chooses for a certain shot will only be used when the shot is taken. If you use the DOF preview button (you get to see the picture through the viewfinder at the CURRENT aperture setting instead of the default full aperture), you will notice how the viewfinder gets darker as you set a smaller aperture. This is because a smaller aperture lets less light through the lens.

    Hope this helped.



    Bernard

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    130

    Default Re: Aperture priority

    P.S. : It is, of course, still possible to over or under expose your shot in both Aperture or Shutter priority modes.

    Just turn the command dial to either + or - EV before taking the shot.


    Bernard

  6. #6

    Default Re: Aperture priority

    to the ts, im sorry for going off topic and hitching a free ride, but what's EV? and how does that work?

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    130

    Default Re: Aperture priority

    Hi with_brokenwings,

    you can access the following link to see what it is

    http://www.dpreview.com/learn/?/Glos...xposure_01.htm


    Bernard

  8. #8

    Default Re: Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by bernardy4416 View Post
    Hi with_brokenwings,

    you can access the following link to see what it is

    http://www.dpreview.com/learn/?/Glos...xposure_01.htm


    Bernard
    THANIKS! =D

  9. #9

    Default Re: Aperture priority

    ok thanks for the response!
    Just one more thing. So since using the DOF preview button, i get a much darker image, so if i wanted a brighter image(and still using aperture priority mode) without sacrificing the DOF, i would have to play around with the:
    1. Exposure compensation dial(+/- EV)
    2. Changing the iso speed
    OR
    1. Change to manual mode and set a slower shutter speed
    2. Use the hyperfocal distance method to make everything from 2.8 to infinity be in focus

    Is this correct??

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    130

    Default Re: Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by jansenaw View Post
    ok thanks for the response!
    Just one more thing. So since using the DOF preview button, i get a much darker image, so if i wanted a brighter image(and still using aperture priority mode) without sacrificing the DOF, i would have to play around with the:
    1. Exposure compensation dial(+/- EV)
    2. Changing the iso speed
    OR
    1. Change to manual mode and set a slower shutter speed
    2. Use the hyperfocal distance method to make everything from 2.8 to infinity be in focus

    Is this correct??
    Hi jansenaw,

    is you need DOF, you have to use a small aperture.

    To compensate, the camera will assign a slower shutter speed. You can increase the ISO of the film, but that will cause grain.

    Let's just say you do not increase the ISO. The shutter speed will now be slower. You just have to ensure that the camera is adequately supported to avoid camera shake if the shutter speed is very slow.

    Using hypofocal puts everything from hypofocal point to infinity in focus for a given aperture. The smaller the aperture, the closer the hypofocal point is to the camera (ie: more things are in focus).

    Good luck. I'll try to assist further if I can.


    Bernard

    P.S. : You really should read a camera basics book. It's hard to get a point across like this. Try one by Michael Freeman or John Hedgecoe (I used them in the past)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •