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Thread: Giving up Photography completely

  1. #41
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    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    Quote Originally Posted by ortega View Post
    for a few years Mr. V, sold away all my lights and Mamiya and darkroom equipment
    only left with my 35mm stuff
    when you want to sell your other stuff (except the D70) let me know yah?
    “How fortunate for leaders that men do not think.” - Adolf Hitler

  2. #42
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    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    I had this feeling before but yet I come back again.. Million times that I mentioned before which made them mad. Haha..

    However, if there's stuff you need to settle, go for it and settle. By then, I guess you will pick up the PnS again. As for DSLR, its hard to say depending on $. No matter what, remember this, capture everything in your life as memory. What you see now might not appear in future. We may give up our goals but we can't forget the memory.

  3. #43

    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    Yeah.. I can empathize with u jsbn. I've thot abt it many times but I guess i'm still in my comfort zone to leave photography for now. But I know a small few who have given up serious photography (using SLRs and switched to compacts or even can't be bothered now).

    My reason is, firstl that it's costly. I might not have been so into photog had I not been working. Those buying and selling. I easily lose hundreds in a year or 2. Thousands $ within 3-5 years. It's hard not to be tempted and want something if you set for yourself high standards. It's worse now that digital has come in. Like it or not, it's hard not to upgrade. Eg: If u used to own the Canon D30 or 1D, you know what I mean. With 3MP how long more could u wait b4 telling yourself to upgrade? If you had bought it brand new when the D30 first came out, it was $4k+. Functions and focusing ain't fantastic compared to the present DSLRs. Say you upgrade to a 10D 3 years later. You'd easily lose at least $3.5k just from depreciation of the D30. Now that's only a short 3 years. Then you need to spend some 3k more for a brand new 10D. Then what's next. The 30D is quite a lot better than the 10D already. Ok, so u can still wait. Fine, I'm sure the next 40D is definitely worth the upgrade. U lose some thosands within 3+ years... So it adds on... That's only the body! U also buy and sell lenses. Acessories, etc.

    But that's not the main part. There's the time and effort u need to learn how to post-process. This is the killer part for most amateurs.

    And also, not forgetting the time and effort to always want the best. U're constantly on your feet thinking about exposure, composition, etc etc. Even when travelling. Sometimes, some of us get the head-shaking from our friends or spouses for not spending enough time with them but instead wandering away taking hours to shoot just 1 shot. Which, unfortunately is no guarantee that it will look anything as nice as those in books, postcards and brochures. Much as the pros would teach u about photography, they'd never admit they spend days or weeks b4 getting good shot. U only see their best, but not the hundreds of rejects. U show your work to your friends, they said Hmm, nice... But in your heart, u know it's not the best possible. Only perhaps the best you could do at that particular point in time you were shooting. Then you wonder, Heck, why spend so much time in one location when someone else with a compact could have done not too far off from you? Indeed, when I travelled recently, I noticed those with compacts seem happier. Whereas for those with their biggy SLRs, they missed out on the true joy of travelling and relaxing.

    I really dunno... I guess being a perfectionist makes me stay on in photography. But I do admit that if it were not for photography, I would have much more time for many other activities. And sometimes, I really need to draw a line between letting go and always being paranoid about getting THE best shot.

    Is that how you feel jsbn?

  4. #44

    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    Quote Originally Posted by kiwi2 View Post
    Yeah.. I can empathize with u jsbn. I've thot abt it many times but I guess i'm still in my comfort zone to leave photography for now. But I know a small few who have given up serious photography (using SLRs and switched to compacts or even can't be bothered now).

    My reason is, firstl that it's costly. I might not have been so into photog had I not been working. Those buying and selling. I easily lose hundreds in a year or 2. Thousands $ within 3-5 years. It's hard not to be tempted and want something if you set for yourself high standards. It's worse now that digital has come in. Like it or not, it's hard not to upgrade. Eg: If u used to own the Canon D30 or 1D, you know what I mean. With 3MP how long more could u wait b4 telling yourself to upgrade? If you had bought it brand new when the D30 first came out, it was $4k+. Functions and focusing ain't fantastic compared to the present DSLRs. Say you upgrade to a 10D 3 years later. You'd easily lose at least $3.5k just from depreciation of the D30. Now that's only a short 3 years. Then you need to spend some 3k more for a brand new 10D. Then what's next. The 30D is quite a lot better than the 10D already. Ok, so u can still wait. Fine, I'm sure the next 40D is definitely worth the upgrade. U lose some thosands within 3+ years... So it adds on... That's only the body! U also buy and sell lenses. Acessories, etc.

    But that's not the main part. There's the time and effort u need to learn how to post-process. This is the killer part for most amateurs.

    And also, not forgetting the time and effort to always want the best. U're constantly on your feet thinking about exposure, composition, etc etc. Even when travelling. Sometimes, some of us get the head-shaking from our friends or spouses for not spending enough time with them but instead wandering away taking hours to shoot just 1 shot. Which, unfortunately is no guarantee that it will look anything as nice as those in books, postcards and brochures. Much as the pros would teach u about photography, they'd never admit they spend days or weeks b4 getting good shot. U only see their best, but not the hundreds of rejects. U show your work to your friends, they said Hmm, nice... But in your heart, u know it's not the best possible. Only perhaps the best you could do at that particular point in time you were shooting. Then you wonder, Heck, why spend so much time in one location when someone else with a compact could have done not too far off from you? Indeed, when I travelled recently, I noticed those with compacts seem happier. Whereas for those with their biggy SLRs, they missed out on the true joy of travelling and relaxing.

    I really dunno... I guess being a perfectionist makes me stay on in photography. But I do admit that if it were not for photography, I would have much more time for many other activities. And sometimes, I really need to draw a line between letting go and always being paranoid about getting THE best shot.

    Is that how you feel jsbn?
    Hi jsbn, IIRC, I started photography journey about the same time as you, and we suffered from cam/ hand shake problem till spending about 1/2 year to understand Metering & White Balance. Now our 2 years plus photography journey has reach this stage...

    And my feeling is exactly spotted by kiwi2....
    Canon 40D|17-55 f/2.8 IS|100 f/2.8 Macro|135 f/2L|300 f/4L IS|430ex|BG-E2

  5. #45

    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    Quote Originally Posted by kiwi2 View Post
    ... Indeed, when I travelled recently, I noticed those with compacts seem happier. Whereas for those with their biggy SLRs, they missed out on the true joy of travelling and relaxing...
    Yes, I fully agree. Those with compacts just shoot and go. They are always laughing and enjoying themselves a lot more ... especially the ladies. They move fast from place to place. All they need is just one general shot of them being together at such and such a place as a group and they are more than satisfied. Weeks or months later, they can look at those snap shots and marvel how much fun they had while on holiday together ...

    We shutter bugs are different. We bring our favorite gears (sometimes quite heavy) and we spent time looking and composing shots; we make special effort to take the best angle, etc. At the end of the day after dinner, we'll be reviewing shots and comparing them to see which are better and how to improve, etc. When we go for vacation, it is as if we are some Pros employed to shoot professional holiday photos for ourselves. We set high standards and we're not easily satisfied with what we've shot, as always. So holiday become stressful, not a relaxing time.

    As for giving up photography totally, there are many possible reasons. It is not just about settling some financial/ emotional/ personal matters alone. It could also by physical or medical condition related.

    If one suddenly loses a well paying job, he/she can prioritize his/her commitments and come back to this hobby later.

    For someone who has developed serious health condition that is life threatening, it is almost "game over" for photography. As for the "not so serious", they could develop some irreversible permanent damage to their e.g. eyes or kneels, making them unable to function as well as they could before, are also quite sad cases.

    It is not easy to give up something one treasure to be an important part of their lives. Morale of the story? If we need really need to "let go" something precious to us, let it go. This will make you feel better. Just know that once upon a time, you have given your very best in your passion e.g. photography and made a lot of good friends who are supportive; that alone should be enough. Decide therefore to be happy with your decision and move on in life.

  6. #46

    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    If you have other priorities to fulfil, then go fulfil them and sell off your stuff.

    I don't think anyone can really give up photography, you just give up using your expensive camera and practising.

    I've always had an interest in photography from the first time my dad passed me his manual Olympus camera. But I just never had the opportunity nor the money nor the time to actively pursue it. When I wanted to, kids came along the way. But you know, all this while, I partially satisfied by interest by using a PnS camera to shoot the major things that have happened in my life - my wedding, travels, kids etc.

    YOu don't need an expensive equipment, or time or anything with a PnS camera, and still be able to record the events in your life, and still keep up your interest in photography.

    Anyway, chin up... even when things get bad, I'm sure when you see a beautifullly taken photo, you'd smile.

  7. #47

    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    Don't baby him.

    He will survive.

    He will return.

    We will be waiting.

  8. #48

    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    I've got a friend who we used to go all around Singapore and take pictures with our film SLR. She did it for her project and i just helped her abit in taking pics. She likes photography so much then.

    A few years later, i met up with her and asked about her photography stuffs. She said she take picture until sian liao. Did not take anymore.

    .... does this consider giving up?

  9. #49

    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    Quote Originally Posted by Caspere View Post
    Don't baby him.

    He will survive.

    He will return.

    We will be waiting.
    So correct! Can't say it better myself.
    deadpoet
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  10. #50
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    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    Quote Originally Posted by josho View Post
    I had this feeling before but yet I come back again.. Million times that I mentioned before which made them mad. Haha..

    However, if there's stuff you need to settle, go for it and settle. By then, I guess you will pick up the PnS again. As for DSLR, its hard to say depending on $. No matter what, remember this, capture everything in your life as memory. What you see now might not appear in future. We may give up our goals but we can't forget the memory.
    yah.. P&S is very fun nowadays and the quality and accuracy is so good now. Look at Fuji F30.. the night shots are brilliant.


  11. #51
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    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    Thnx for everything guys.

    Well, the thought of giving up photography entirely did cross my mind once. When I sold off my EOS 300D when I got absolutely disgusted at what I was doing. Its not about the cost per se. But its something else... a feeling.

    The lure came back again as I got my Dynax 5D. Small & humble camera and it brought me up another plane on photography - the Philosophical and Artistic portion of Photography. After I returned from my Hokkaido trip, I slowly began to realise another side of Photography, that its not all everything about equipment talk and so on. A later trip to Tokyo earlier in the year and returning with great photos (it was an alone trip) strengthened my conviction on this. No, haven't won any awards though. I sold and acquired j0h0's S3Pro (a wonderful camera with great dynamic range that allowed me landscape shots beyond anything I'd imagined).

    Unfortunately, some things are not really meant to be. As I move up 1 step further, in the process of discovering more, unexpected things happen which left me somewhat drained mentally and emotionally. Its almost like 10,000 suns suddenly appeared and dried up all the lakes, rivers and seas of inspiration that are waiting to be discovered within me. And the drive simply drops.

    Standing in the middle of the desert, no signs nothing, knowing that u can't scream cos u'll die of thirst faster and having a weather chart that says, "Haha! No rain expected till Fate's done thoroughly playing with u.", knowing full well u can't walk either cos u'll sweat and also die of dehydration and the horizon's all sand with no civilisation in sight. Silently screaming away at ur current state but with no place to vent it all out.

    I personally do hope to regain that drive once again. But not for myself. But for someone else.

  12. #52

    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    As far as I am concerned, to hobbyists like me who try to "make art", in the broader scheme of things, photography is really not that important.

    What is important is life.

    Give up photography, if you wish. No big deal. There are other very important things.

    But do not give up on life, and living it!
    Last edited by student; 29th December 2006 at 03:29 PM.

  13. #53
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    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    Quote Originally Posted by student View Post
    As far as I am concerned, to hobbyists like me who try to "make art", in the broader scheme of things, photography is really not that important.

    What is important is life.

    Give up photography, if you wish. No big deal. There are other very important things.

    But do not give up on life, and living it!
    Ever had that feeling where someone stripped u naked, locked u in a dark room, turned off all the lights, threw away the key and u see at a corner a pack of ravaging fierce dogs waiting to snap ur privates off?

    U can't run cos the room's locked.
    U can't fight cos even if u win, u'll be all bloody, medical care denied and u'll die of injuries.
    U can't scream cos its a sound proof room and screaming will sap ur strength.
    Sitting there can't do anything to help either since it means the pack of dogs would eat u with great relish.

  14. #54

    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    damn, seldom do I find something I can agree with student.

    jsbn, the most important thing is, be happy, lead a happy life. So, if photography is part of it, great, if not cie la vie.

    Wither way, wish you best of luck, and BE HAPPY!
    deadpoet
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  15. #55

    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    I'm so lost in this discussion.
    Is there a danger in taking photographs that we don't know about but has been revealed to jsbn? I don't understand Please share before it's too late!
    It is the camera, not the photographer.
    my flickr - adamloh.com

  16. #56
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    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    Quote Originally Posted by Deadpoet View Post
    damn, seldom do I find something I can agree with student.

    jsbn, the most important thing is, be happy, lead a happy life. So, if photography is part of it, great, if not cie la vie.

    Wither way, wish you best of luck, and BE HAPPY!
    Thnx.

    Its great seeing u in person (kinda like 2 opposing polarities in ur online persona and real life persona) when I was still holding onto that 300D and the Canongrapher photo hunt thingy, the photo shot with the 70-200 f/4L with that out-of-focus ERP gantry sign thing... sure brings back memories.

    I will still come in here around, check things out. Photography will probably take a backseat for now as I re-sort the priorities in my life. Thanks for the 1up as I try to struggle past that sandpaper, every inch is kinda agonising, so much so that I feel like regressing into silence forever, talking seems to be much of a chore these days.

  17. #57

    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    Call it photography fatigue or burn-out. It happens just about anything that we do particularly on things we eagerly plunge head-on into it in life. Remember the sport, game or toy you like once upon a time? To rectify the problem, stay out of it at least for a while. If you do happen to find the twitch in your triggering finger again whenever you spot a nice "picture perfect" situation or a "nice model" or seen how awful some photos taken by others when you know you can do better just to show them, then you might come back. Otherwise, you'll be completely off it forever eventhough you will still like photography or art. That happened to me some 13 or 14 years ago whether with photography or painting. Just do whatever you feel. There's no loss. Whatever you've gained is still with you.

  18. #58
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    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    Quote Originally Posted by adamadam View Post
    I'm so lost in this discussion.
    Is there a danger in taking photographs that we don't know about but has been revealed to jsbn? I don't understand Please share before it's too late!
    Erm... no. No danger. Its just something.

    These may just be dead words, but everyone of ur feelings reached my heart. Thnx.

  19. #59
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    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    sigh.. after reading it.. seems like i got this idea of giving it up too.. i do feel tired by this hobby.

  20. #60
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    Default Re: Giving up Photography completely

    Hey everyone, chill... chill.

    Don't let my pessimism and problems get to u all.

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