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Thread: How would you feel if an ex(?)-'professional' said this?

  1. #41

    Default Re: How would you feel if an ex(?)-'professional' said this?

    The evolution of technology....we need to keep up with the industry trends if we want to survive in the business......a tool is just a tool, the difference is the person using the tool.
    A DSLR is modelled to be like SLR, so there's no excuse about the workflow in using a DSLR over a SLR these days....even my 60yrs old dad uses DSLR now.

    at some point, I admit that I am sometimes guilty of having the mentality of the 'old-school of thoughts', but I think the original author was trying to stress the point that the basic of photography is still very important. (eg. Framing, lighting, color, subject matter, timing, precision, etc etc...)

    Perhaps the person who made that statement thought that the new generation of Digital Photographers lacked certain skills that the old-school film photographers had....
    DXNMedia.net
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  2. #42
    Senior Member oracle0711's Avatar
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    Default Re: How would you feel if an ex(?)-'professional' said this?

    Things change and that is a fact undeniable. Years back before digital SLR were introduced, 4R prints from rolls of films, processed and inserted into an album is what clients would get. That's probably the end product of what they pay for (except maybe some would want enlargement, etc). In such a situation, the scope of negotiation falls within how many roll of films to buy from the photographer for the AD shoots.

    In the digital space and with consumer become more aware of the tools we use (the Digital SLR), the number of films no longer hold much value as like we all know we can shoot as many as our storage card can store. Therefore, our clients have a case to argue against paying number of pictures taken. In fact, they take it that it does not costs anything (which we know is untrue as we still need to buy CF and SD cards) since our storage cards are reusable.

    This create a new dimension in the photographer-client negotiation game. As photographer we need to move beyond asking for payment by the traditional way. Look at the coffee-table album and magazine-style album which represents the new direction of offering somethime more creative and the ability to identify with the client that it is costly to print such albums and yet retain the likings of the client and their willingness to part with their money.

    While I believe in competing in skills and style, I also believe in strong business marketing and creativity. I don't like price war and hardly negotiate in price with my clients. I show them first what I can offer as end-products and if they like it, than we talk about price. Often than not, we ended trading a bit of this and that but my basic service fee still remains unchanged. What changes is what they want to receive as the end-product.

    If you want to be a in this business, do what a full-time business should do, constant evolvement and move with time, offer new things to your clients and potential clients - it's the same for all businesses. You've to put everything you have into it and make it work - competition is always there - which is why you guy better and better.

  3. #43
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    Default Re: How would you feel if an ex(?)-'professional' said this?

    Quote Originally Posted by iggy View Post
    Here's another one for you ...."Cow Gum"
    I missed the smell of cow gum.
    The sounds of “kok-kic-kok” wanton mee peddlers.
    It’s good old memories, but life didn’t stop there and than. We moved on.

    I live in the era of Rock & Roll, funky long hair and Hard Rock music. I’m enjoying Hip-hop with my kids now. Some tastes never change; we compromised with pizzas and hamburgers.

    The market evolved, consumers’ taste changed and our business survival needs adapting to it. Some brought the latest tools with the first mover advantage or disadvantage, some waited, some never got into it. The industry is better as a whole with some being left behind, lamenting the good old days.

    A reflection on adapting to the changes in our lives, 40s are not so young anymore but 50s are not too old either. Technological improvement are meant to enrich our quality of lives, enhance our skills and performances.
    just1book, no kidding!

  4. #44
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    Default Re: How would you feel if an ex(?)-'professional' said this?

    Quote Originally Posted by DXNMedia View Post
    The evolution of technology....we need to keep up with the industry trends if we want to survive in the business......a tool is just a tool, the difference is the person using the tool.
    A DSLR is modelled to be like SLR, so there's no excuse about the workflow in using a DSLR over a SLR these days....even my 60yrs old dad uses DSLR now.

    at some point, I admit that I am sometimes guilty of having the mentality of the 'old-school of thoughts', but I think the original author was trying to stress the point that the basic of photography is still very important. (eg. Framing, lighting, color, subject matter, timing, precision, etc etc...)

    Perhaps the person who made that statement thought that the new generation of Digital Photographers lacked certain skills that the old-school film photographers had....
    Well said
    As a commercial printer, we are sucker and slave to new technologies.
    The fundamental never change, the artistic torch and sense of quality remained.
    We’ve printed great works scanned from trans, with no retorching and as it is. Cool creative works from PS and “new wave” with mixture of everything. Some are simply great, some cool, some rubbish, but all in the name of art.
    just1book, no kidding!

  5. #45

    Default Re: How would you feel if an ex(?)-'professional' said this?

    Bottom line is... He's not going to read these comments.
    Why bother...



    .

  6. #46

    Default Re: How would you feel if an ex(?)-'professional' said this?

    Probably not, eventhough he appears to be aware of the existance of this forum.

    However, what's great was the depth and thoughts on this subject, which was what I was hoping for, rather than the 'don't bother what he thinks' comments.

    Thanks for sharing guys (and gals).

  7. #47
    Senior Member zoossh's Avatar
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    Default Re: How would you feel if an ex(?)-'professional' said this?

    some painters would have felt and said the same when photography was up. a difference in art form, a replacement over their achievements.

    there is sometimes very much a mixed feeling hidden behind the projected opinion, which is the strongest among artist and professionals as there are stronger conflicts either to their establishments or commerical interest. this gentleman have subconciously admitted that good works can be produced with digital capture and enhancement, and he may be surprised if you go on and ask him really how much he knows about photoshop.

    i'm only curious and interested to know if someone who is very good with digital enhancement says the same thing he does.
    Last edited by zoossh; 17th December 2006 at 01:14 AM.

  8. #48

    Default Re: How would you feel if an ex(?)-'professional' said this?

    DSLR is still a niche, and no offence to anyone but, to produce good photos with a DSLR do not just rely on your "skills" with the camera anymore, its how you make it present well, with the help of technology, which is meant to push the limits everytime you are creating art.

    So for DSLR users who conform to the die-die-also-no-post-processing, time really flies quickly. PS is too common that even Adobe and Apple recognises the fact that photographic post-processing is essential. Aperature and Lightroom is their first try in this market. Especially with the advant of raw imaging, haha, I guess its just the down point for using a newer and more user-friendly technology, you are relegated to be associated with those who just use it because its cheaper now, or just simply filfthy rich.

    I for one, a surrealist, make full use of post-processing softwares out there. I compose my pictures with emphasis on colours, highlights and shadows. I held my first landscape photography exhibition last month, and someone even said, "your work have no potential at all, they are just splashes of colours". Hell yeah he's right, I force myself to forget my subject/target and just concentrate on colours.

    Btw, hes a professional photographer with 12~15 years (if Im not wrong) experiences in landscape photography, on film. Hes real good, so I respect his critiques. But surrealists are always just anti-conventions, so what to do? Lol.

    Yeah I agree, the new era is here. Cheaper ways to do things, easier ways to do things.

  9. #49

    Default Re: How would you feel if an ex(?)-'professional' said this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sion View Post
    Some also evolve aslo die what.
    Maybe evolved "too little, too late" ... reason why they follow, but can't make it.

    Better be the 1st, 2nd and 3rd wave, rather than the 4th or Last 5th wave ... ( it's the true ! ).


    Btw, Brother you got humour leh, i like !

  10. #50

    Default Re: How would you feel if an ex(?)-'professional' said this?

    Quote Originally Posted by iggy View Post
    Here's another one for you ...."Cow Gum"
    I remember almost 20 years ago, i was using the heat-&-wax machine to do the mechanical artwork or the so-called camera-ready artworks ( which is used for the colour sep or postive films, for offset printings ). Using the COW gum was for small work, while the wax methods are for large area designed for publication layouts.

    COW gums will go with set-squares and dividers, and the "NT cutters" ... hahahahah

    I remember Letraset Singaproe used to be at the Plaza Singapura in the 80's, and moved to a smaller premises at Beach Road area, serving the ad agency and design firm belt in that area.

    Anyone remember the Airbrush and the Pump ? ... Well, i used to be an Airbrush artist / illustrator ... ... the inks and the fumes --- terrible days, with lungs and wind pipes problems

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