Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst ... 25678 LastLast
Results 121 to 140 of 151

Thread: What a turn-off!

  1. #121
    Member Static's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Surfing soft porn in CS
    Posts
    1,079

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by Silence Sky View Post
    You belong to the 66.6%
    's advocate
    陳綺貞 2010 [夏季練習曲] 巡迴演唱會 Cheer Concert 13 Nov 2010 MAX Pavilion@Singapore Expo

  2. #122

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by sehsuan View Post

    The link is that in a meritocracy society, a person can't rely on a non-existent welfare system to pay for bills, because a nation of overgrown infants will collapse the entire nation by internal debt alone. Why insurance, is because it is a disciplined way of setting aside money for that unforeseen rainy day, which no-one has a chance of knowing when it will come, and in what form. Please note that PMIS and insurance payouts in the form of Death, TPD and Critical Illnesses, are all separate. A person who is admitted into hospital for example cancer, can claim from his/her policy a payout for Critical Illness if he/she has contracted the illness as defined by the insurer, which is pretty standard since all major insurers are all members of the Life Insurance Association (www.lia.org.sg). In other words, a person who contracted cancer can have a lump sum for immediate treatment, and a much reduced medical bill to pay for hospitalization etc. With Hospital Income insurance, there will be a small amount of cash a person will receive for each day housed up in a hospital. It may not seem much, but a month of say, $250 x 30 days => $7.5K. Better than zero.

    If in the first place a person doesn't want to put aside money for later use, he would probably say the same things as you did. Note that as late as three centuries ago, people were lucky if they lived to 60 years old. What else apart from hygiene allowed humans to live to 75+ these days? If it isn't medical advancement (of which a person can opt out from, save money and just die), I don't know what it is. I would be happy to explain to you in person how all these things function, but you should check first with your own FSC to see what can be done. That's why we're called, FINANCIAL SERVICES consultant. It's not an empty misnomer/moniker, depending on how you see it.

    That suggestion was for those who are saying the entire medical system locally is poop. If a person hasn't had the virtue/habit of setting aside cash for a rainy day... then too bad. Then again, how many of us has a cash savings of say, $100K for medical treatment, at any one point of time? Should you have that cash amount, would you want to splurge it one shot, run out of money and end up using even more than that? That debt incurred would have to be paid for by the family - someone's gotta pay for it.


    I would like to sum things off this way - if a person doesn't want to put aside money for his/her own future - the person may not have a pleasant future of being around with his/her grandchildren for long. It's a personal choice.

    Hello there:

    You are painting only half of the picture, the rosy side only.
    1) You get lump sum only if you are diagnosed with cancer at advance stage. You will not get lump sum if you are diagnosed with stage 1 and 2 cancer.
    2) Hospital Income insurance – How many days can I claim? If I stay in hospital for more than a year, Can I claim for the full duration? Tell us the maximum number of days we can claim per year or per policy. For you to claim $250 per day, what should be your per day salary? It is true that you can only be insured up to 70% of your salary? How many of us here earn that kind of money?

    Every insurance plan is different. Please, tell me if my basic understanding is not correct.

    You also talk like a rich man, do you know many out there are trying to make both ends meet? Who do not want to buy the most comprehensive insurance coverage? And how many of us can really afford it?

    I bought the NTUC Plan B for my loved ones. We chose “C class” for hospitalisation and at the end day my entire saving is wiped out just by paying the co-payment sum.

    Tell me, how much premium I must pay to be fully covered for a medical expanse of 250k.
    Last edited by Silence Sky; 31st October 2006 at 03:38 PM.

  3. #123

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    I understand that we should not ask for free medical service, because according to economic explanation this practice will lead to inefficient use of scarce resources. What happens if everyone wants to stay in class A?

    The point here is that the people in white tell us that we are heavily subsidized. Is it true to be what they claimed?

    When I pay peanut and the monkey service me, it is fine. That is a fair deal. But is it still fair when the medical institution receives the full fee and I still receive monkey services?

    I will not blame the doctors or staffs from Restructured Hospitals for the poor services. In the private sector a doctor takes care of 10 patience but in the RH a doctor has to look after 100 patience. They are overworked and underpaid. So can we still say the government subsidies us heavily?

    If I purposely jack the cost of medical service (say from $100 to $200) and later charge you $100. Can I say that I have subsidized you by $100?

    Here’s a true account, you are welcome to verify it.
    My friend suffered from colon cancer. He is a Malaysian and needs to undergo chemotherapy. Our hospitals charge him SGD$50,000 for the course of treatment.
    Too expansive, so he went back to JB to seek treatment in a private hospital. The medical cost is $21,000 Ringgit!!!! I suppose it will be even cheaper had he went to a public hospital.
    The drug used in Singapore and JB is exactly the same!!!
    Why this there such a stark difference in medical cost between the two close neighbor?

    Ladies and Gentlemen: Are we subsidized or have we pay our due IN FULL…
    Last edited by Silence Sky; 31st October 2006 at 09:45 PM.

  4. #124

    Smile Re: What a turn-off!

    my vote is secret.

    Quote Originally Posted by kcuf2 View Post
    Now then you know meh? mmm..are u one of the 66.66% that finally wake up or are you the enlightened 33.33% that already see through these craps?

    Singaporeans are so stupid, despite the cruel fact that is laid in front of them, they still choose to be the 66.66%. Price hikes and all these are already forseen and you all got the choice and power to change your life, but yet you all still choose the dead man's route.

    All these 66.66% is the reason for wat we are having now, and well since that is what they want, i have nothing to say.

  5. #125
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    A village in a forest
    Posts
    1,515

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    I don't think that we should use a foreigner as example. If I'm not wrong, only a S'pore citizen and PR will receive the subsidize rate. I don't think a Malaysian can receive the same rate as us in a S'pore Hospital.

    Anyway to add on to this topic, I feel that generally the rate we are paying is still quite fair, and there are many ways to pay for your medical expenses. Other than using our own Medisave, there is the Medishield(Which you can upgrade). Then there are the various medical insurance and some companies do provide medical insurance for their employees. There are also some other avenues we can use, but I'm not too sure about those.

    Generally our system is to ensure that no one can abuse the public welfare fund. Also as mention by others, the taxes we pay are still comparatively low, and the government do need to use public funds in other areas too. In my opinion, if a government allocate too much budget into the welfare, people will tend to abuse it, and eventually the economy will be too burdened by it(eg USA and some European countries).

    But one thing about our hospital, is the services provided by the doctors, that is...none. I'm quite ok with the general services provided by the admin staff and the nurses, but I'm appalled by the lack of services provided by the doctors.

    I've stayed 3 years in Europe, and had the chance to use the hospital services there. When you set an appointment, the most you have to wait is 10 mins after the appointment time, unlike here where you have to wait up to 1 hour after appointment time. And the doctors there will try to make you understand your conditions and even go through the procedure. Here the doctors are like:"Ok, every thing looks fine. You may go. NEXT!!" Some of the doctors here are even quite insensitive to the patients.(If you want to talk about the gynae here, I have another whole list of things to talk about I had 1 child born oversea and 1 child born in S'pore, so have experience 2 different medical services)
    Last edited by kelccm; 31st October 2006 at 05:47 PM.
    Canon 80D|Panasonic LX3/LX5
    35f2 IS|50f1.8|85f1.8|12-24f4|18-135f4-5.6 IS|28-75f2.8

  6. #126
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    1,226

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by Hoky View Post
    Yes, but they are heavily subsidized by the Medicare system... one which is much much better than our Medisave + Medishield combined.
    From the way I see it, our 20% contribution of CPF (on top of our income tax) is no diff from the income tax of Australia. The only benefit is that you can buy HDB with it / invest in funds.. etc..
    Our model is like that of the states whereby there's the 401k on top of Social security taxs... You can use it to invest but can't touch it. (Don't compare SG to the states, they have healthcare insurances, min. wage laws, and their average pay can be about 2 ~ 4 times ours)

    In Australia, all these taxes are pooled and contributed back to the people by means of medicare, infrastructure building, doughs.... at least to who really needs it. In Singapore, you contribute to CPF (OA, SA) and Medisave... but at what percentage of it can you really utilize? Moreover, there's the minimum sum of 120k to leave inside CPF when you retire... Where does this money really go to? You know it's there, but you can't touch / use it...

    Sorry OOT abit below... just a little bit of illustration of how people are "taken care of" apart from healthcare systems...

    In Australia / UK, citizens / residents are really well covered. They have the "redundancy" system and strong union systems.. to protect employees if case they are to be laid off.

    In Singapore, employers reserve the rights to terminate / retrench the workers by providing a minimal "notice period sum". In the states, there's another term called the furlough and it's a popular method in order to get rid of employees without paying anything. In time to come, this would be made popular in SG too...
    Don't really know how you can compare the CPF system with income tax in Australia. They are basically 2 different things. If you really want to compare, compare the CPF with the Superannuation system in Australia. And I would say that the side benefit of CPF, helping you get a house, is not so small either.

    If you want to add in the cost of the compulsory health insurance in the States, I think you would find that the cost isn't so small either. And perhaps you also want to check out how their Social Security system is in urgent need of revamp 'cos what they are paying out grossly exceeds what they are taking in. You might also want to think about the side effects of min. wage laws... those who get jobs will benefit; but in return, the job market shrinks due to higher labour costs and you get that much more un-employed, who no doubt would be equally happy to be living off the generous dole in the States but would be in dire straits in Sg.

    What % of CPF can you utilise? All of it. You use OA for your housing. You use MA for your medical care. The SA for your retirement. What's left of it (in all three accounts) will go to your nominees when you pass away. (there's a poster alleging that MA funds must go to the MA account of nominees. This is not true.) And $120,000 in your min. sum when you retire gives you like $750 a month for 20 years after you are eligible to start withdrawing the monthly payout at age 62. Think you can maintain your current standard of living on $750 a month, if you can meet the min sum?

    When you talk about countries with free healthcare, welfare handouts, have you really consider their system as whole? Include in their unemployment rates, tax rates, etc? There's no free lunch in the world. When something is done for "free", it just means that something else is given up elsewhere or everyone is being squeezed a little more. The NHS in the UK, a "free" healthcare system, has long waiting times, is understaffed, and is bleeding people to the private sector every year. The States healthcare system requires compulsory health insurance. If you fork out the same amount as what you would pay for a health insurance policy in the States, you would be pretty well covered here in Sg too.

    I'm sure that our system is not perfect and I'm certain some parts of it either sucks big time or is downright dumb, but what I'm saying that don't compare our worse bits with the best bits of other countries. Tunnel vision doesn't really help.

  7. #127

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    [QUOTE=kelccm;2575251]I don't think that we should use a foreigner as example. If I'm not wrong, only a S'pore citizen and PR will receive the subsidize rate. I don't think a Malaysian can receive the same rate as us in a S'pore Hospital.
    QUOTE]

    The point I am trying to bring across using a foreigner as example is that, I citizen of Singapore after receiving subsidized rate from my garment, I am still paying a higher price than having get myself treated in a foreign country.
    Did my garment really subsidised my medical bill?
    Last edited by Silence Sky; 31st October 2006 at 10:01 PM.

  8. #128

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by justarius View Post
    Don't really know how you can compare the CPF system with income tax in Australia. They are basically 2 different things. If you really want to compare, compare the CPF with the Superannuation system in Australia. And I would say that the side benefit of CPF, helping you get a house, is not so small either.

    If you want to add in the cost of the compulsory health insurance in the States, I think you would find that the cost isn't so small either. And perhaps you also want to check out how their Social Security system is in urgent need of revamp 'cos what they are paying out grossly exceeds what they are taking in. You might also want to think about the side effects of min. wage laws... those who get jobs will benefit; but in return, the job market shrinks due to higher labour costs and you get that much more un-employed, who no doubt would be equally happy to be living off the generous dole in the States but would be in dire straits in Sg.

    What % of CPF can you utilise? All of it. You use OA for your housing. You use MA for your medical care. The SA for your retirement. What's left of it (in all three accounts) will go to your nominees when you pass away. (there's a poster alleging that MA funds must go to the MA account of nominees. This is not true.) And $120,000 in your min. sum when you retire gives you like $750 a month for 20 years after you are eligible to start withdrawing the monthly payout at age 62. Think you can maintain your current standard of living on $750 a month, if you can meet the min sum?

    When you talk about countries with free healthcare, welfare handouts, have you really consider their system as whole? Include in their unemployment rates, tax rates, etc? There's no free lunch in the world. When something is done for "free", it just means that something else is given up elsewhere or everyone is being squeezed a little more. The NHS in the UK, a "free" healthcare system, has long waiting times, is understaffed, and is bleeding people to the private sector every year. The States healthcare system requires compulsory health insurance. If you fork out the same amount as what you would pay for a health insurance policy in the States, you would be pretty well covered here in Sg too.

    I'm sure that our system is not perfect and I'm certain some parts of it either sucks big time or is downright dumb, but what I'm saying that don't compare our worse bits with the best bits of other countries. Tunnel vision doesn't really help.
    Well said

  9. #129
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    A village in a forest
    Posts
    1,515

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by Silence Sky View Post
    The point I am trying to bring across using a foreigner as example is that, I citizen of Singapore after receiving subsidized rate from my garment, I am still paying a higher price than having get myself treated in a foreign country.
    Did my garment really subsidised my medical bill?
    Have you tried seeking medical treatment oversea without any form of subsidies?? Your example given was for a Malaysian trying to seek treatment in Singapore, not a Singaporean. If you are talking about your own experiences, then which class ward are you talking about?? Class A, B1, B2 or C?? I don't think a foreigner is allowed to use Class C ward, as it is the most heavily subsidised, so you really have to see was it a fair comparison you were making.

    Our medical services are tiered for different income level people. If you are the one who always been using Class A ward, and still complain about the high cost of medical treatment, then you are just shooting yourself in the mouth.

    The problem here is people expects medical treatment to be free or at least very cheap. They don't think about all the hidden cost behind the medical treatment, or the research done to come out with better drugs or procedures. They expect the government to take care of everything, but don't realise the consequences of giving too much welfare. You should see the number of bummers living off the welfare system in US and Europe.

    For the poor, I have read about some charitable organisation that do give free medical treatment to the needy. Even the NKF(other than the Durai scandal) had helped to make dialysis more affordable for everyone. The key here is how to educate everyone on how they can take care of themselves.
    Canon 80D|Panasonic LX3/LX5
    35f2 IS|50f1.8|85f1.8|12-24f4|18-135f4-5.6 IS|28-75f2.8

  10. #130

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    kelccm - ya hor especially those who are born physically impaired must need more of your education hor.

    do you know it is fun to have one in the family

    panadol alredi enormonously heavily subsidised they still want better medication
    Last edited by dDarkroom; 31st October 2006 at 11:51 PM.

  11. #131
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    A village in a forest
    Posts
    1,515

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by dDarkroom View Post
    kelccm - ya hor especially those who are born physically impaired must need more of your education hor.

    do you know it is fun to have one in the family

    panadol alredi enormonously heavily subsidised they still want better medication
    Oh well, you can't please everyone. Sometime you just got to accept the hard truth. Anyway I don't think there is a perfect medical system anywhere. It depends on whether you want to wallow in your own misery or really do something about it.
    Canon 80D|Panasonic LX3/LX5
    35f2 IS|50f1.8|85f1.8|12-24f4|18-135f4-5.6 IS|28-75f2.8

  12. #132

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by kelccm View Post
    Oh well, you can't please everyone. Sometime you just got to accept the hard truth. Anyway I don't think there is a perfect medical system anywhere. It depends on whether you want to wallow in your own misery or really do something about it.
    you make a good tongue twister - go into preaching or politic ba

  13. #133
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    A village in a forest
    Posts
    1,515

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by dDarkroom View Post
    you make a good tongue twister - go into preaching or politic ba
    Frankly speaking you are not making any sense now. Are you trying to tell us that anyone not singing to your tune are not allowed to state their opinion??
    Canon 80D|Panasonic LX3/LX5
    35f2 IS|50f1.8|85f1.8|12-24f4|18-135f4-5.6 IS|28-75f2.8

  14. #134

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by justarius View Post
    Don't really know how you can compare the CPF system with income tax in Australia. They are basically 2 different things. If you really want to compare, compare the CPF with the Superannuation system in Australia. And I would say that the side benefit of CPF, helping you get a house, is not so small either.

    If you want to add in the cost of the compulsory health insurance in the States, I think you would find that the cost isn't so small either. And perhaps you also want to check out how their Social Security system is in urgent need of revamp 'cos what they are paying out grossly exceeds what they are taking in. You might also want to think about the side effects of min. wage laws... those who get jobs will benefit; but in return, the job market shrinks due to higher labour costs and you get that much more un-employed, who no doubt would be equally happy to be living off the generous dole in the States but would be in dire straits in Sg.

    What % of CPF can you utilise? All of it. You use OA for your housing. You use MA for your medical care. The SA for your retirement. What's left of it (in all three accounts) will go to your nominees when you pass away. (there's a poster alleging that MA funds must go to the MA account of nominees. This is not true.) And $120,000 in your min. sum when you retire gives you like $750 a month for 20 years after you are eligible to start withdrawing the monthly payout at age 62. Think you can maintain your current standard of living on $750 a month, if you can meet the min sum?

    When you talk about countries with free healthcare, welfare handouts, have you really consider their system as whole? Include in their unemployment rates, tax rates, etc? There's no free lunch in the world. When something is done for "free", it just means that something else is given up elsewhere or everyone is being squeezed a little more. The NHS in the UK, a "free" healthcare system, has long waiting times, is understaffed, and is bleeding people to the private sector every year. The States healthcare system requires compulsory health insurance. If you fork out the same amount as what you would pay for a health insurance policy in the States, you would be pretty well covered here in Sg too.

    I'm sure that our system is not perfect and I'm certain some parts of it either sucks big time or is downright dumb, but what I'm saying that don't compare our worse bits with the best bits of other countries. Tunnel vision doesn't really help.
    Why I'm comparing the CPF to Aussie income tax system.
    Yes, you can utilize OA to buy HDB... but what if you are staying with your parents and you don't need to buy a HDB... What can't you really do with it? Buy funds?
    It's as good as invisible like our COE (we don't really get a cert with it... )
    In terms of immediate use like healthcare for co-payment, this money can be better utilized.
    But if you really need to get a lodging in SG, I would say that the CPF is a very good system to aid the citizens, and housing loan interests are very low as compared to Australia or the States. (about 6.7% or more).

    Health insurance in the States is heavily subsidized by employers. These insurances typically cover the rest of the (immediate) family as well. If only our employers does the same.
    I was working in a major GLC (Govt linked company) as an engineer 4 years ago. The only insurance the company provides is accidental / incidental within the company's premises... If you have any ailment (heart attack, stroke or car accident juz outside the compound... etc) outside the premises, it's your business and the company doesn't cover you. Whereas for my other jobs in several MNCs, their insurances are more comprehensive and some cover dependants as well. I was very well covered when I was working in the States until recently. A normal GP visit would cost about S$100+, but it's free with employer's insurances. To add on... dole is more of a problem in the UK and Australia rather than US...
    For min. wage... if they do not impose that ruling, their economy will be in chaos.. everyone will be tempted to "importing" and hiring Mexicans, Chinese Nationals... etc. It would be like Singapore whereby cheap employers hires cheap labour as much as they can and term them "foreign talent" when you have the human resources locally.

    I was told by a HR colleague (somewhere last year), an private employer paying EP / WP for a FT is cheaper than a household paying WP for a domestic helper (maid). I'm paying $280 for WP for my domestic helper at this moment. Can someone clarify if the WP / EP fees for private employers are lower?

    As for MA going to MA of nominees, that's the case for me for both of my deceased parents.
    Please let me know if you have a way of retrieving it as cash. (I really need some advice on this)

    I agree that there's no perfect system. There's always equal and opposite to everything. Just have to strike an equal balance.
    And to be honest, I'm not happy with the 120k min sum... Ever thought about those low income holders? They may not be able to hit this figure. By the time they retire, they virtually got nothing.
    Last edited by Hoky; 1st November 2006 at 12:26 AM.

  15. #135

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by kelccm View Post
    Frankly speaking you are not making any sense now. Are you trying to tell us that anyone not singing to your tune are not allowed to state their opinion??
    Wah... chill man...
    No point flaming each other, only make each other upset only.

    This thread only allows us to express our frustrations, wishes and beliefs.
    Basically, it's also termed as "talking c-o-c-k". Not as if we can do anything realistic....
    Last edited by Hoky; 1st November 2006 at 12:33 AM.

  16. #136

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by kelccm View Post
    Frankly speaking you are not making any sense now. Are you trying to tell us that anyone not singing to your tune are not allowed to state their opinion??
    btw what tune am I playing - do re me or me re do

    sure you can have your own view but i saw your potential so suggest a career path for you.

  17. #137
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    A village in a forest
    Posts
    1,515

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by dDarkroom View Post
    btw what tune am I playing - do re me or me re do

    sure you can have your own view but i saw your potential so suggest a career path for you.
    That can be easily interpreted as an insult. Rather than pointing out which part of my views you don't agree with, you go around insulting people. This topic seem to be a thorn in your flesh. You may say whatever you like about me, I have stated my views, and thats the end of this topic for me. Good luck to you.
    Canon 80D|Panasonic LX3/LX5
    35f2 IS|50f1.8|85f1.8|12-24f4|18-135f4-5.6 IS|28-75f2.8

  18. #138
    Deregistered
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    6,601

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by yanyewkay View Post
    Yes I do have a good financial planner and insurance agent and am coverd somewhat but I don't take the effort to memorise what the 3 accounts in my CPF does because I don't have to take those terms out everyday to study and sell some ideas to others based on them.
    Well, most people will have to look inside the wallets everyday a couple of times, but remember CPF is money that you've earned but can't see. It's like a bank deposit - money is put into there by "force" to ensure we don't spent it all and have nothing for emergencies, to an extent. Your own advisor would be more than willing to explain what you can do with these funds. The roles of the OA, SA and MA are pretty simple, it's much easier than debugging codes if I were to stay in computing, or teaching different classes if I were to still be a teacher.

    Quote Originally Posted by dDarkroom View Post
    sehsuan, please don't sell your product here. you jolly well go to the golf club and meet your high flyer clients that can afford original lens and local warranty cam.
    I am not selling here. I am only explaining my line of work for those who are mistakenly believing what they know is "right". Like I occasionally tell friends, don't ask the butcher to teach you how to do surgery...

    In times of need, can a lens pay for your medical bills? Or can a camera? I don't work well with golfers personally, but generally those who can afford golfing etc are more than able to afford medical bills. Three persons with 20K, 10K, and 2K income. To whom would a big medical bill be HARDEST to? "High flyer" clients may have a large net worth that can be liquidated for bills, but most of us heartlanders don't. No money to pay can almost certainly and indirectly mean, waiting to die. Having money to pay doesn't guarantee the ability to survive, but it's the CHANCE or HOPE that the family gets that is more important.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hoky View Post
    No sales soliciting here....
    Post your ad. at Services Offered / Wanted pls...
    I am not posting any ad for sales. Please pay attention to your own words.

    I am not intending to solicit any sales on the forums, since it is not my interest to trawl a large net, but I do welcome people who want to find out more to contact me. This is fully compliant with industry practices.

    Quote Originally Posted by Silence Sky View Post
    Hello there:

    You are painting only half of the picture, the rosy side only.
    1) You get lump sum only if you are diagnosed with cancer at advance stage. You will not get lump sum if you are diagnosed with stage 1 and 2 cancer.
    2) Hospital Income insurance – How many days can I claim? If I stay in hospital for more than a year, Can I claim for the full duration? Tell us the maximum number of days we can claim per year or per policy. For you to claim $250 per day, what should be your per day salary? It is true that you can only be insured up to 70% of your salary? How many of us here earn that kind of money?

    Every insurance plan is different. Please, tell me if my basic understanding is not correct.
    1. Most critical illness/dread disease policies will pay upon DIAGNOSIS of a first-time major cancer, and do not need to wait till advanced stage before paying out the lump sum. Insurance companies are not so "jek up" to let a person suffer from Stage 1/2 until Advanced stage - and then give money to throw into a bottomless pit, that I can assure you. For specific clarification, you have to refer to your own policy contract, or request a sample contract to have a look.

    2. Hospital Insurance - I can't say for other companies, I can only say for my own Principal.

    i) Sickness
    Up to $250 a day (up to 500 days max per sickness) Daily Hospital Income; PLUS an additional up to $750 a day (up to 30 days max per sickness) if warded into ICU. If a person gets an illness and goes warded in ICU, he could get up to $1000 for each of the first 30 days.

    ii) Accident
    Up to $250 a day (up to 500 days per accident) Daily Hospital Income; PLUS an additional up to $500 a day (up to 500 days per accident) Daily Accidental Hospital Income; PLUS an additional up to $750 a day (up to 30 days per accident) ICU Income if warded in ICU. If a person gets an accident and goes warded in ICU, he could get up to $1500 for each of the first 30 days.

    I believe I have answered your question of being warded for over a year, since 500 days is more than a year.

    To get $250 of income per day, you don't have to be a big earner in the first place to get it. There are three plans - generally meant for children, adults, and higher income earners, but nothing is cast in stone to say, only who can buy what. There is no rules to say a low-income person can't get the $250 per day Daily Hospital Income policy, but the premiums will be correspondingly higher than the other plans. The 70% thing does not apply to anything at all, it's just a guideline for Life Insurance, which is a different thing from this kind of Hospital Income policies. I hope I didn't confuse you here.

    True. Every type plan is different from each other, though from company to company you may be able to find a couple of distinguishing factors.

    Quote Originally Posted by Silence Sky View Post
    You also talk like a rich man, do you know many out there are trying to make both ends meet? Who do not want to buy the most comprehensive insurance coverage? And how many of us can really afford it?

    I bought the NTUC Plan B for my loved ones. We chose “C class” for hospitalisation and at the end day my entire saving is wiped out just by paying the co-payment sum.

    Tell me, how much premium I must pay to be fully covered for a medical expanse of 250k.
    Just to set the record straight - I'm not rich. I have fellow shooters here who know me in person who can vouch for me.

    Honestly, a person needs only to know two main things about hospitalization. Private or Govt/Restructured, then the number of beds in a ward. There are people who I have come across as wanting to buy some form of insurance, but may not be able to do so not because of lack of money, but rather health-related conditions. Affordability is a concern, as you mentioned - but when there is a real need for even more money, where is that money going to come from? Comprehensive... it depends on individual needs, really.

    I'm afraid that medical/health insurance cannot be calculated like a regular life policy. In life policies, it's very straightforward to know if a person has deceased, or is totally permanently disabled. For medical, there is no real key indicator to say a person is terminally ill or nearly there. A bill may not stop at 250K, that's where medical insurance may be able to offset it to a much "digestable" amount, though there will still be a fair lot to pay out-of-the-pocket. It's a good thing that you got a Plan B for your family, but you may want to clarify this point - sometimes when other things flood the wards (like dengue), and fills up the C wards, if you'd be penalized by this "pro-ration factor" should you be forced to move up to B1/B2 class wards. I know for sure my principal doesn't have this factor, so a patient is free to choose which level of comfort he/she wants to be warded in.

  19. #139
    Deregistered
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    6,601

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by justarius View Post
    The States healthcare system requires compulsory health insurance. If you fork out the same amount as what you would pay for a health insurance policy in the States, you would be pretty well covered here in Sg too.

    I'm sure that our system is not perfect and I'm certain some parts of it either sucks big time or is downright dumb, but what I'm saying that don't compare our worse bits with the best bits of other countries. Tunnel vision doesn't really help.
    Hey Justarius,

    Thanks for the clarification. I was sure I heard a colleague telling me about compulsory health insurance somewhere...

    Quote Originally Posted by Silence Sky View Post
    The point I am trying to bring across using a foreigner as example is that, I citizen of Singapore after receiving subsidized rate from my garment, I am still paying a higher price than having get myself treated in a foreign country.
    Did my garment really subsidised my medical bill?
    Huh? Wait... you got me confused. Was it you, your friend or your close relative who you're comparing costs in Singapore and Malaysia against?

    Quote Originally Posted by dDarkroom View Post
    kelccm - ya hor especially those who are born physically impaired must need more of your education hor.

    do you know it is fun to have one in the family
    Pride does nobody good.

    As Kelccm has noted, you're getting nonsensical. With all due respect, I wish you good health and good fortune that nothing befalls, because with your mentality shown, no logical agent will want to help you out.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hoky View Post
    Why I'm comparing the CPF to Aussie income tax system.
    Yes, you can utilize OA to buy HDB... but what if you are staying with your parents and you don't need to buy a HDB... What can't you really do with it? Buy funds?
    It's as good as invisible like our COE (we don't really get a cert with it... )
    In terms of immediate use like healthcare for co-payment, this money can be better utilized.
    The CPF Board allows members like you and I to put it into insurance-linked funds for both protection and potential growth, if we have no particular use of the money. OA is guaranteed 2.5% interest per year, but different funds from companies may be able to grow more than that, though nothing is guaranteed. Basing on historic evidence, there is a a general growth trend with long term investments. It also serves as an emergency fund to pay for housing loans via CPF when a person loses his job too. It also can be readied for retirement by placing it for growth over long term, as earlier mentioned.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hoky View Post
    Health insurance in the States is heavily subsidized by employers. These insurances typically cover the rest of the (immediate) family as well. If only our employers does the same.
    I was working in a major GLC (Govt linked company) as an engineer 4 years ago. The only insurance the company provides is accidental / incidental within the company's premises... If you have any ailment (heart attack, stroke or car accident juz outside the compound... etc) outside the premises, it's your business and the company doesn't cover you. Whereas for my other jobs in several MNCs, their insurances are more comprehensive and some cover dependants as well. I was very well covered when I was working in the States until recently. A normal GP visit would cost about S$100+, but it's free with employer's insurances. To add on... dole is more of a problem in the UK and Australia rather than US...
    For min. wage... if they do not impose that ruling, their economy will be in chaos.. everyone will be tempted to "importing" and hiring Mexicans, Chinese Nationals... etc. It would be like Singapore whereby cheap employers hires cheap labour as much as they can and term them "foreign talent" when you have the human resources locally.
    If you were in the position of the management, there are employees who are happier to claim in ANY WAY POSSIBLE so as to get their worth. That practice will cost the company more as more claims have been made with the insurer - which means, an escalating cost. Would that make sense?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hoky View Post
    I was told by a HR colleague (somewhere last year), an private employer paying EP / WP for a FT is cheaper than a household paying WP for a domestic helper (maid). I'm paying $280 for WP for my domestic helper at this moment. Can someone clarify if the WP / EP fees for private employers are lower?
    This, I do not know. Apologies here.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hoky View Post
    As for MA going to MA of nominees, that's the case for me for both of my deceased parents.
    Please let me know if you have a way of retrieving it as cash. (I really need some advice on this)
    Cash? No way. Until whoever receives it has retired, there may be a chance, but more likely than not, it's a straightforward "no".

    Quote Originally Posted by Hoky View Post
    I agree that there's no perfect system. There's always equal and opposite to everything. Just have to strike an equal balance.
    And to be honest, I'm not happy with the 120k min sum... Ever thought about those low income holders? They may not be able to hit this figure. By the time they retire, they virtually got nothing.
    Exactly. For the lower income earners, you can look around Chinatown. There are old people going around, trawling in dustbins to collect aluminium cans to sell for cash. Could the CPF be not important?

    One thing I know for sure is that the USA is the world's greatest (or one of them) debtors. Singapore is a little red dot - to get people to bring money to this little island, things have to be made attractive to attract investors. No investors => economy collapse. One of the enticements for investors is now the lowered CPF contribution rate, which saves employers money, because in terms of economy, China and other countries are cheaper and are able to churn out quality products at MUCH lower costs. Heck, even my iPod comes from China!

  20. #140

    Default Re: What a turn-off!

    Quote Originally Posted by sehsuan View Post

    1. Most critical illness/dread disease policies will pay upon DIAGNOSIS of a first-time major cancer, and do not need to wait till advanced stage before paying out the lump sum. Insurance companies are not so "jek up" to let a person suffer from Stage 1/2 until Advanced stage - and then give money to throw into a bottomless pit, that I can assure you. For specific clarification, you have to refer to your own policy contract, or request a sample contract to have a look.

    2. Hospital Insurance - I can't say for other companies, I can only say for my own Principal.

    i) Sickness
    Up to $250 a day (up to 500 days max per sickness) Daily Hospital Income; PLUS an additional up to $750 a day (up to 30 days max per sickness) if warded into ICU. If a person gets an illness and goes warded in ICU, he could get up to $1000 for each of the first 30 days.

    ii) Accident
    Up to $250 a day (up to 500 days per accident) Daily Hospital Income; PLUS an additional up to $500 a day (up to 500 days per accident) Daily Accidental Hospital Income; PLUS an additional up to $750 a day (up to 30 days per accident) ICU Income if warded in ICU. If a person gets an accident and goes warded in ICU, he could get up to $1500 for each of the first 30 days.

    I believe I have answered your question of being warded for over a year, since 500 days is more than a year.

    To get $250 of income per day, you don't have to be a big earner in the first place to get it. There are three plans - generally meant for children, adults, and higher income earners, but nothing is cast in stone to say, only who can buy what. There is no rules to say a low-income person can't get the $250 per day Daily Hospital Income policy, but the premiums will be correspondingly higher than the other plans. The 70% thing does not apply to anything at all, it's just a guideline for Life Insurance, which is a different thing from this kind of Hospital Income policies. I hope I didn't confuse you here.

    True. Every type plan is different from each other, though from company to company you may be able to find a couple of distinguishing factors.

    Just to set the record straight - I'm not rich. I have fellow shooters here who know me in person who can vouch for me.

    Honestly, a person needs only to know two main things about hospitalization. Private or Govt/Restructured, then the number of beds in a ward. There are people who I have come across as wanting to buy some form of insurance, but may not be able to do so not because of lack of money, but rather health-related conditions. Affordability is a concern, as you mentioned - but when there is a real need for even more money, where is that money going to come from? Comprehensive... it depends on individual needs, really.

    I'm afraid that medical/health insurance cannot be calculated like a regular life policy. In life policies, it's very straightforward to know if a person has deceased, or is totally permanently disabled. For medical, there is no real key indicator to say a person is terminally ill or nearly there. A bill may not stop at 250K, that's where medical insurance may be able to offset it to a much "digestable" amount, though there will still be a fair lot to pay out-of-the-pocket. It's a good thing that you got a Plan B for your family, but you may want to clarify this point - sometimes when other things flood the wards (like dengue), and fills up the C wards, if you'd be penalized by this "pro-ration factor" should you be forced to move up to B1/B2 class wards. I know for sure my principal doesn't have this factor, so a patient is free to choose which level of comfort he/she wants to be warded in.

    Hello Sehsuan:

    Thanks for sharing these information, I appreciate it.
    The thing I like about this forum is we can have views from people from all walks of life. It is great to have good people sharing with us their expertise.

    The Hospital Insurance looks very attractive. What is the premium I have to pay to get that level of coverage?
    Last edited by Silence Sky; 1st November 2006 at 09:10 PM.

Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst ... 25678 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •