Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: what does this mean?

  1. #1

    Default what does this mean?

    whenver i open a pic taken by my d200 on adobe cs2,

    it shows me this...

    "the document has an embedded color profile that does not match the curretn RGB working space.
    embedded sRGB IEC61966-2.1
    working adobe RGB (1998)

    wat would you like to do?

    1)use the embedded profile
    2)convert document colors to the working space
    3)discard the embeded profile"

    so, which option should i choose and may i know why is there such a message?
    thanks for your patience.i'm a newbie to photoshop CS and my d200

  2. #2

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    Basically, it's a colour space mismatch. Under the colour management settings in PS CS, set the working colour space to sRGB to match the colour space your camera is using. Colour management is not on by default, so I assume you know where the settings screen is since you've turned it on.

  3. #3
    Senior Member zoossh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    8,725

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by jeanie View Post
    whenver i open a pic taken by my d200 on adobe cs2,

    it shows me this...

    "the document has an embedded color profile that does not match the curretn RGB working space.
    embedded sRGB IEC61966-2.1
    working adobe RGB (1998)

    wat would you like to do?

    1)use the embedded profile
    2)convert document colors to the working space
    3)discard the embeded profile"

    so, which option should i choose and may i know why is there such a message?
    thanks for your patience.i'm a newbie to photoshop CS and my d200
    i would save it as sRGB IEC61966-2.1 if i'm doing it only for web posting, as adobe RGB (1998) if i think i would want to print them. if i'm undecided, i would leave it in the same profile as much as possible.

    however, i suggest that if you want to print them, change your camera setting to adobe RGB (1998) and avoid the profile change in CS.

    p.s. i dun use CS, i use elements who dun force me to change the profile, but i do make selection before saving.

  4. #4

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by zoossh View Post
    i would save it as sRGB IEC61966-2.1 if i'm doing it only for web posting, as adobe RGB (1998) if i think i would want to print them. if i'm undecided, i would leave it in the same profile as much as possible.

    however, i suggest that if you want to print them, change your camera setting to adobe RGB (1998) and avoid the profile change in CS.

    p.s. i dun use CS, i use elements who dun force me to change the profile, but i do make selection before saving.

    so adobe RGB on camera and computer is the way to go right?
    thanks

  5. #5

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    Some photolabs still request that you convert it to sRGB for printing though. Check with the one you frequent
    Furry Photos - Photography for the Modern Pet

  6. #6

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by raptor84 View Post
    Some photolabs still request that you convert it to sRGB for printing though. Check with the one you frequent

    wah lidat beri blur lei

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Western SG
    Posts
    1,537

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by jeanie View Post
    wah lidat beri blur lei
    2 school of thought:

    1) shoot AdobeRGB and work in AdobeRGB space in Photoshop CS. (do your own inkjet printing and hope future have better printers/monitors that can handle close to AdobeRGB.)

    2) shoot sRGB and work in sRGB space in Photoshop CS (what you see is what you get, and most photo labs either ignore your embedded profile or print close to sRGB space, eg like frontier 570 have bigger greens than sRGB.)

    Soon you might encounter the "Jpeg vs Raw" workflow....

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    www.whltelightphotographer.com
    Posts
    1,834

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    No ber No ber. If you think print photos is more important set colour space to Adobe RGB (1998). Because it have a wider Garmut (Or colour range). But check with photo lab can are they also using the same colour profile. If you only want to see photo on the computer screen and think web presentation or usage is more important then go with sRGB. sRGB also can print one. Main thing you want to uniform your colour profile, so you can predic how you colour will come out as time go by. The expert call it "colour management" and yes there devices can help you to do that. But they are expensive.

  9. #9

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by jeanie View Post
    whenver i open a pic taken by my d200 on adobe cs2,

    it shows me this...

    "the document has an embedded color profile that does not match the curretn RGB working space.
    embedded sRGB IEC61966-2.1
    working adobe RGB (1998)

    wat would you like to do?

    1)use the embedded profile
    2)convert document colors to the working space
    3)discard the embeded profile"

    so, which option should i choose and may i know why is there such a message?
    thanks for your patience.i'm a newbie to photoshop CS and my d200
    You may want to read up on Color profile in the help section of Photoshop.

    After reading, you will understand why there is such a message pop up to alert you and know which option to choose according to your needs. Only you will know what you need. Different people have different needs and that's why there are options for people to choose.

    To disable this color profile mismatch alert in CS2, go to edit/colour settings..... to untick this alert option. Alternatively, change your working space profile to match your camera RGB. ..... depending on your needs.
    Last edited by Clockunder; 10th October 2006 at 05:58 PM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member zoossh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    8,725

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by jeanie View Post
    so adobe RGB on camera and computer is the way to go right?
    thanks
    eh. i think so. frankly speaking, i'm still blur about a lot of things even from the basic. despite of moving on for 1 year, shot some decent pictures that i feel ok with, i feel that i'm still blur about many things. perhaps one day i really need a physics text on lens and photography to help fix my unresolving perplexity.

    in the meanwhile, just move on and shoot, and listen to the loudest advice you heard until magically you managed to understand it through your own experience.

  11. #11
    Moderator Clown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    3,779

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    my advice is convert, edit and save at first using adobeRGB because of the gamut.
    when going to print, if you have the profile of your printer, turn on the soft proofing option in photoshop then do final color adjustment for printing. then save the adjusted image as another copy for printing at that specific printer only.
    sigh.

  12. #12

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    thanks all for the advice.
    i'll stick to sRGB to match my camera.

  13. #13
    Member doremonx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Hillview
    Posts
    538

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    Hi,

    I also have the same question but mostly already answered in the thread.

    Embedded: sRGB IEC61966-2.1
    Working: adobe RGB (1998)

    What would you like to do?

    1)use the embedded profile
    2)convert document colors to the working space
    3)discard the embeded profile

    If we select (1) - it will be sRGB.
    If we select (2) - it will convert to adobe RGB (1998)

    What if we select (3)???

  14. #14

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by doremonx View Post
    Hi,

    I also have the same question but mostly already answered in the thread.

    Embedded: sRGB IEC61966-2.1
    Working: adobe RGB (1998)

    What would you like to do?

    1)use the embedded profile
    2)convert document colors to the working space
    3)discard the embeded profile

    If we select (1) - it will be sRGB.
    If we select (2) - it will convert to adobe RGB (1998)

    What if we select (3)???
    If select (3), the picture becomes without any color profile embedded (i.e. untagged) when it's saved.
    Last edited by Clockunder; 12th October 2006 at 10:30 AM.

  15. #15
    Senior Member zoossh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    8,725

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by Clockunder View Post
    If select (3), the picture becomes without any color profile embedded (i.e. untagged) when it's saved.
    so what does that means actually? widest color gamut?

  16. #16

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by zoossh View Post
    so what does that means actually? widest color gamut?
    This is sometihng which I'm not sure too but I presume that it means it will be worked with watever color settings specified for working space in photoshop when it's opened and if there is no alert set for missing color profile or displayed using the default color profile of the device.
    Last edited by Clockunder; 12th October 2006 at 11:46 AM.

  17. #17

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by jeanie View Post
    thanks all for the advice.
    i'll stick to sRGB to match my camera.
    Bad choice. Go get your D200 manual and find out how to set the camera to Adobe RGB. Not difficult to do this.

    Work in Adobe RGB for most of your work, and when you want to post it for web, or send to lab for printing, convert to sRGB.

    Bottom line, if you work in sRGB and then later come back to Adobe RGB, you've lost the additional Gamut (range of colour) given by Adobe RGB. The other way round, you discard only at the end product point, not at the point of shooting.

    What's gone is gone, forever. If you don't need it, don't want it, or the printer can't do it, discard it later. At least you'll have the option.

  18. #18

    Default Re: what does this mean?

    ok, so i set to adobe RGB on my d200 and adobe photoshop cs2.

    then how i convert the pics i've touched up to sRGB for printing?i hope i dont sound stupid.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •