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Thread: Newbie question on ND filters

  1. #1

    Default Newbie question on ND filters

    I'm about to get some filters for a "sunny" trip with some waterfalls.
    The first thing that came to my mind is ND filters.

    What would be common ND "range" to buy? ND2, ND4, ND8??

    Between a coated and uncoated lenses, what's the difference in effects?
    (Forget about flare, not worried about it; the lens hood take care of most of it)

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Newbie question on ND filters

    ND2,4, 8 cuts 1,2 and 3 stops respectively.

    personally, i have a ND2 and a ND4. can stack to get different NDs, that give ND8 too cos can stack them. may cost a bit more but better option i think.

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    Senior Member yyD70S's Avatar
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    Default Re: Newbie question on ND filters

    Personally, I use the ND8.

    For something less (more subtle), I use the Circular Polariser which (depending on the make) acts as an emergency "stop-gap" 1-2 stop ND.

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    Default Re: Newbie question on ND filters

    I would recommend getting the ND8. It's better to have more stops than less. Afterall, if its too dark you can still lower the shutter speed, but you can't increase the shutter speed to get the motion effects if you get a ND4 and find it's not dark enough.
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    Default Re: Newbie question on ND filters

    You can also use a polariser (either on its own or with an ND filter) to cut down the light. In addition, the polariser allows you to remove reflections from the water and/or other surfaces.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Newbie question on ND filters

    Quote Originally Posted by kietgnoel View Post
    You can also use a polariser (either on its own or with an ND filter) to cut down the light. In addition, the polariser allows you to remove reflections from the water and/or other surfaces.
    Well, I'm getting this for my 10-22mm. And an ultra-wide focal length with the CP can result in an unevenness in photos.

    That's why I'm looking at soley ND for stopping down light.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Newbie question on ND filters

    Quote Originally Posted by yyD70S View Post
    Personally, I use the ND8.

    For something less (more subtle), I use the Circular Polariser which (depending on the make) acts as an emergency "stop-gap" 1-2 stop ND.
    Errr... are you using the multi coated ones?
    The only reason I can find to use HMC / MRC is for flare / ghosting resistance.

  8. #8
    Senior Member yyD70S's Avatar
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    Default Re: Newbie question on ND filters

    Kenko Pro 1D filters are, of course, multicoated. The one reason why I bought this particular filter, "the Kenko Pro 1D ND8" was because it's value-for-money. I ordered one direct from http://www.maxsaver.net -- don't think so they have stock now. Believe me, you really need an ND8 more than an ND2 or ND4.

    On top of that, it is very slim; as slim as the Nikon CPII (circular polariser)-- if you know what I meant; and it uses the "same/equivalent coating" as the Nikon.

    You are right in saying that a polariser may not be very suitable for a superwide; your Canon 10-22mm (by the way, that's a very good superwide you have).



    Quote Originally Posted by Hoky View Post
    Errr... are you using the multi coated ones?
    The only reason I can find to use HMC / MRC is for flare / ghosting resistance.

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