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Thread: Asakusa, TOKYO

  1. #1

    Default Asakusa, TOKYO




    A quick snapshot of the religious in Japan

  2. #2

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    Comments leh... anyone...

    How to improve? I basically only know how to use 'P' in my S40.

  3. #3
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    hey urban,

    since you're dishing for comments, perhaps i would like to hear more from you too.

    what did you wanna capture with your shot?

    your caption says "A quick snapshot of the religious in Japan".. and we see a series of people in different poses.. a lady disturbed by the fumes, a photographer, and backs of people.

    guess it's a question of composition. perhaps closer shots of fewer people in prayer might help, perhaps maybe a series of pictures instead..

    just me 2 ruble's worth.

  4. #4

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    Originally posted by urban
    Comments leh... anyone...

    How to improve? I basically only know how to use 'P' in my S40.
    P mode is fine for outdoors.

    Suggestions would be:

    1. Move in closer, don't use the zoom at all.

    2. Look for a nice angle, and a good moment. No need to snap straightaway.

    3. Set to continuous shooting mode, and fire away when you feel the moment is right. This way, you will have a few shots to choose from later, when they're on your computer.

  5. #5

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    Unlike the temple in Singapore, these people do not put the joss sticks into the urn. In fact there are already burning joss sticks in the urn. These people gather round the urn to 'scoop' the fumes and place their hand on their body. Some sort of blessing i guess.

    I think the recommendations are really good.

    Should have sort a series of photos to choose the best shot.
    And yes certain people in the photo look out of place (eg. photographer).
    May be a good idea to wait and should a close-up of the lady being 'affected' by the fumes.

    Thanks guys...

  6. #6
    Sin
    Guests

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    Originally posted by urban
    Unlike the temple in Singapore, these people do not put the joss sticks into the urn. In fact there are already burning joss sticks in the urn. These people gather round the urn to 'scoop' the fumes and place their hand on their body. Some sort of blessing i guess.

    It is LIKE Singapore (shows how much you know about religious practices in S'pore ... just joking )

    Yes, people do put joss sticks into the urn (how else did those joss sticks get in there in the first place). The people believe that the fumes of the joss sticks have sanctifying and curative properties. They scoop the fumes and "apply" them over the ailing parts of their bodies to pray for healing or just general health. They also "scoop" them to their face as well as inhale them in the hope of getting the blessing of the diety.

    This belief and action is also practiced by many in Singapore, with basically the same reason. This sort of scene happen mostly in Buddhist shrines. Japanese Shinto shrines have a very different practice and decor, hopefully you did get to see this other side Japanese religion in your visit.


  7. #7

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    It is LIKE Singapore (shows how much you know about religious practices in S'pore ... just joking )
    If you read carefully, I am trying to explain that the devotees do not put the joss sticks into the urn. It was already burning (of course some one has to put it in, probably the monks did it). Maybe temples in Singapore also has monks putting the joss sticks the whole day too. But my limited knowledge of temple practices in Singapore tell me 'no'. (Si Ma Lu Kwan Im Temple on new year's day).But please read my post carefully.

  8. #8
    Sin
    Guests

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    Originally posted by urban


    If you read carefully, I am trying to explain that the devotees do not put the joss sticks into the urn. It was already burning (of course some one has to put it in, probably the monks did it). Maybe temples in Singapore also has monks putting the joss sticks the whole day too. But my limited knowledge of temple practices in Singapore tell me 'no'. (Si Ma Lu Kwan Im Temple on new year's day). But please read my post carefully.
    No. The DEVOTEES DO put the joss sticks in. The monks do not. If you have observed closely, the joss sticks are short sticks (relative to what we see in S'pore and this region) of green colour which the Devotees buy (usually 100 yen a small bunch), light and then place inside the urn. The devotees are the main people putting the joss sticks in the urn, not the monk. Perhaps the bunch of devotees you were observing were not putting the joss sticks in.


    Sheesh, some people have no sense of humour. One of the main reason I don't like to post. You never know when someone will take your innocen remarks to be offensive...

  9. #9

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    heh heh... sin is correct.

    Your first time to japan? japan hv lots of religious practice. asakusa's practise is probably the most "boring" since it resembles those practices in singapore (other than joss stick they use looks different).

    Shinto shrines are the most interesting if you hv chance to see them. of coz there are weird practices like sex shrines etc..heh.

    anyway, your post say quicksnap shot. and its really a snapshot like thousands of others.

    do u go around asakusa for shooting? there are many interesting items there, like a special type of icecream in biscuit. special candy floss etc....

  10. #10
    Sin
    Guests

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    Originally posted by Shadus
    Shinto shrines are the most interesting if you hv chance to see them. of coz there are weird practices like sex shrines etc..heh.
    Tch tch tch "shrines to fertility". (Time to venerate the sex organs!!!)

  11. #11

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    Sin is probably correct. My apologies.

    Did not take the ice cream there (eat too much liao). According to my Japanese friend, that is the best shop in all of Japan. But sometimes cannot trust this friend's taste. we also bought some sort of cake that the Princess likes to eat (IMHO, not tasty).

    My favourite time was when I spent the night in the Ryokan in Atami. Nobody understood us and we did not understand anyone in the ryokan. but we had a wonderful dinner and breakfast plus the traditional hot spring... no photos... sorry.

    Visited the typical Shinto shrine near Hakone but did not see unusual ones like the ones mentioned.

  12. #12

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    urban...heh heh

    usually, its acquired taste. the cake is yummie.... dun u think so?

    actually, i hate the breakfast in japan. only rice and some dishes.... not fulfilling at all

    The Hakone shrine is pretty deserted if i'm not wrong. well, usually, they are. Unless they've a ceremony.

  13. #13

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    Shadus heh heh.

    Biscuit only so-so...

    the ryokan dinner was fantastic. eat like king as they serve it in the room. very nice and tasty.

    I also like the sashimi in the fish market in tokyo.

    but after a while (three weeks), all japanese food taste like was 'soya sauce'.

    you are right Hakone shrine was quite empty but there were people doing preparations for ceremony.

    do you know anywhere else nice to visit? i may visit again in a few months' time.

  14. #14

    Default

    LOL.
    oh, get your jap friends to intro some good food. Usually, only those family business, small shops hv terrific food! but they only understand japanese, and often they dun hv pictures for u to point to...haha. So, got to know a bit of jap.

    Hokkaido is nice! MUST visit if you go there.

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