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Thread: What do i charge?

  1. #21

    Default Re: What do i charge?

    Quote Originally Posted by creampuff
    Do you have an idea how long the session is going to take? Get an idea what needs to be shot, shoot location and the approach of how the food is to be shot. In other words, you need to be clear with the client beforehand the job scope and how the pictures are to look.

    Trust me, this is an important aspect that is so often overlooked. In food photography time is of the essence and believe me, you'll never really have enough time. So you need to be clear from the onset how you're going to execute the shot. This will help minimise disputes later.

    Once you can tabulate the extent of the work, you can then itemise what is chargeable:
    your time, material, manpower, transport, etc and the profit you need to make.

    So many restaurant owners have little or no idea how much it costs to get that beautiful food photography they see in coffee table/cook books. I'm sure you will be shocked too.

    So far i am not sure about the time factor or what they expect. we didnt really start the main talk yet. I started this thread so that i can be prepared and have an idea to negotiate when i need to.

  2. #22
    Senior Member creampuff's Avatar
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    Default Re: What do i charge?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashwin
    Yea i think i will ask them to suggest whats their budget first rater then i suggest what i want. I am aware that food photography can be tricky especially if i use hot lights and stuff and i have shoot something like ice-cream which will melt by the time i am ready to click.
    So that part will be challenging for me.
    Their budget estimate will almost always be far, far lower than the norm. Simply put, they often have no idea how long nor how difficult it is - they are in the food business, not photography. Likewise you need to be aware yourself of the amount of effort you need to put in to get the final result. This can be quantifiable into dollars and cents. The important thing is you and your would be client needs to be "on the same page" on the budget and on the final product.

    Bro, you better brush up your knowledge of food photography pronto and big time because nobody actually uses real ice cream in photo or video shoots. The secret is mashed potatoes dyed with food colouring.

  3. #23

    Default Re: What do i charge?

    Quote Originally Posted by creampuff
    Their budget estimate will almost always be far, far lower than the norm. Simply put, they often have no idea how long nor how difficult it is - they are in the food business, not photography. Likewise you need to be aware yourself of the amount of effort you need to put in to get the final result. This can be quantifiable into dollars and cents. The important thing is you and your would be client needs to be "on the same page" on the budget and on the final product.

    Bro, you better brush up your knowledge of food photography pronto and big time because nobody actually uses real ice cream in photo or video shoots. The secret is mashed potatoes dyed with food colouring.
    wow oh my god! Mashed potatoes??
    haha.. i am aware of that top secret long back
    anyway you made a good point here, they have no idea abt photography.. so i guess i will quantify my effort into $$ and come up with a profit margin. Then decide if they can fit into.
    How is the plan?

  4. #24

    Default Re: What do i charge?

    Quote Originally Posted by creampuff
    Their budget estimate will almost always be far, far lower than the norm. Simply put, they often have no idea how long nor how difficult it is - they are in the food business, not photography. Likewise you need to be aware yourself of the amount of effort you need to put in to get the final result. This can be quantifiable into dollars and cents. The important thing is you and your would be client needs to be "on the same page" on the budget and on the final product.

    Bro, you better brush up your knowledge of food photography pronto and big time because nobody actually uses real ice cream in photo or video shoots. The secret is mashed potatoes dyed with food colouring.
    not necessary liao...in the past yes...but now, most of the time, real ice-cream is used.

    speed is the essence...

  5. #25
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    Default Re: What do i charge?

    Quote Originally Posted by creampuff
    Their budget estimate will almost always be far, far lower than the norm. Simply put, they often have no idea how long nor how difficult it is - they are in the food business, not photography. Likewise you need to be aware yourself of the amount of effort you need to put in to get the final result. This can be quantifiable into dollars and cents. The important thing is you and your would be client needs to be "on the same page" on the budget and on the final product.

    Bro, you better brush up your knowledge of food photography pronto and big time because nobody actually uses real ice cream in photo or video shoots. The secret is mashed potatoes dyed with food colouring.

    Nowadays, its real ice cream. But you probably won't wanna eat that after you are done...

  6. #26

    Default Re: What do i charge?

    If you are gonna shoot real ice-cream, I wouldn't recommend shooting with hot lights. And I would have gallons of the ice-cream on hand cos I doubt if you can get it on the 1st try. Better still shoot in one of those industrial freezers that you can drive a car into.

  7. #27

    Default Re: What do i charge?

    Quote Originally Posted by hondasleeper
    You cannot possibly make up your prices as you go along.If you start doing that, it'll say alot about how you operate. Give them a price and stick to it.

    Might as well tell the client, I will charge you once the project is done. It is depending if the shots are good, if they are I will be charging you more. What a load of nonsense! If that's the case, nobody will engage you to work for them. Please give valid advice and not misleading information.

    To the thread starter, ask them what kind of budget they are working with, if they do have one, and try if at all possible to work with them within their budget, unless it is so ridiculously low that it isn't worth doing it. Then just be up front with them and tell them it really isn't worth your while to do it if the price is really low.

    Honestly, food photography is a very different beast than product photography. There are tricks to make the food look good and if you don't know what you are doing I would suggest getting a food stylist to help you.
    i guess you misunderstood me. i mean show his client shots that he has taken previously to show them his talents and skill. so the client will pay without much questions asked.

    cheers.
    random equipment.
    where are my primes?

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