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Thread: What's the dpi for the sony cypershot DSC-717?

  1. #1
    hannoush
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    Unhappy What's the dpi for the sony cypershot DSC-717?

    Can anyone tell me the dpi for the sony cypershot DSC-717?

  2. #2

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  3. #3
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    Default

    you're probably referring to resolution, which is 5MP. "dpi" doesn't make much sense for a camera.
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

  4. #4
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    Cameras has no inherent 'dpi'. DPI only makes sense when a print size is specified. E.g. 8 x 10" at 300dpi. The number by itself is senseless.

    Regards
    CK

  5. #5
    hannoush
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    Default Some how it makes sense!

    I used to have an Olympus d600L and it produses 144 dpi regardless of the image size. It has 3 levels quality as stated in almost all the digital cameras. But these (number x number) is only the image (file) size. E.G. the image could be around 2000 x 3000 pixles which is high, but with a resolution as low as 72 dpi (dot per inch).

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Some how it makes sense!

    Originally posted by hannoush
    I used to have an Olympus d600L and it produses 144 dpi regardless of the image size. It has 3 levels quality as stated in almost all the digital cameras. But these (number x number) is only the image (file) size. E.G. the image could be around 2000 x 3000 pixles which is high, but with a resolution as low as 72 dpi (dot per inch).
    No, the file can be tagged with whatever dpi by the camera. it has NO EFFECT on quality. A 1600x1200 file can be tagged at 600dpi, 300dpi, or even 1dpi and it will have the same quality on screen.

    dpi (or more accurately PPI) is only relevant when printing, or when a output size is specified. That 1600x1200 will print at 300dpi at around 4x5.33333", if at 150dpi, you can get 8 x 10.666".

    This dpi thing is the single most misunderstood thing in digital photography. This must be the dunno-how-many-th time I explain liao, should really get a FAQ going....

    Regards
    CK

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Some how it makes sense!

    Originally posted by hannoush
    I used to have an Olympus d600L and it produses 144 dpi regardless of the image size. It has 3 levels quality as stated in almost all the digital cameras. But these (number x number) is only the image (file) size. E.G. the image could be around 2000 x 3000 pixles which is high, but with a resolution as low as 72 dpi (dot per inch).
    a 2000x3000 image is only 72dpi when you print it 27.8 inch by 41.7 inch. if you print the image smaller, you get a higher DPI. The "2000" refers to the bumber of "image dots". If you don't have output, where does the "inch" come from?

    also 2000x3000 is not the file size. the uncompressed file size is 2000x3000x24bit (for 24bit images) or 144 million bit (18million bytes).
    Last edited by mpenza; 10th January 2003 at 02:53 PM.
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

  8. #8

    Default Re: Re: Some how it makes sense!


    Maybe its someone masquerading as hannosh
    trying to get you to finally write something for CS

    heh heh... lai lai, help all of us blur guys here

    Originally posted by ckiang


    No, the file can be tagged with whatever dpi by the camera. it has NO EFFECT on quality. A 1600x1200 file can be tagged at 600dpi, 300dpi, or even 1dpi and it will have the same quality on screen.

    dpi (or more accurately PPI) is only relevant when printing, or when a output size is specified. That 1600x1200 will print at 300dpi at around 4x5.33333", if at 150dpi, you can get 8 x 10.666".

    This dpi thing is the single most misunderstood thing in digital photography. This must be the dunno-how-many-th time I explain liao, should really get a FAQ going....

    Regards
    CK

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