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Thread: Settings on a 35mm

  1. #1
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    Default Settings on a 35mm

    Hi guys, recently i found my dad's 35mm camera and started to fiddle with it.

    Okay for a start, this fella has a 50mm lens and a 2X tele converter on it.

    I just bought 2 rolls of ISO200 films for it and i'm now thinking what sort of settings should i be using.

    I need help with setting the aperture, is there a fixed rule? Or is it judging by experience?

    For example, if i'm shooting an object 1m away from me under room light condition, what sort of settings should i be using?

    I have a flash that comes with it, and that's a problem too; if i were to use the flash, what aperture settings should i be using, considering the scenario is the same as above.

    A little overloading here, but i just wanna know more about manual settings.

    Cheers!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Settings on a 35mm

    perhaps you would like to identify the camera first. what brand is the cam/lens? what is the max aperture of the lens? brand of TC?

    i doubt its a good idea to use a 2x TC on a 50mm lens.

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    Default Re: Settings on a 35mm

    Quote Originally Posted by Isaiahfortythirtyone
    perhaps you would like to identify the camera first. what brand is the cam/lens? what is the max aperture of the lens? brand of TC?

    i doubt its a good idea to use a 2x TC on a 50mm lens.
    Camera: Chinon CM-4s
    Lens: Auto Chinon 1:1.9 50mm f/1.9-f/16
    TC is some old-school stuff(this is what it says): King MC auto tele converter 2X for Pentax-K

    Oh yeah there's a Hoya diffuser, if it makes a difference..

    So i should remove the 2x TC?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Settings on a 35mm

    Try this link. It seems quite helpful if you do not have the original manual.

    http://www.butkus.org/chinon/cm-4s/cm-4s.htm

    Tells wat shutter to use. Looks like u set the shutter speed according to the ambient lighting and adjust the aperture till you get the LED lighting in the middle.

    hope this helps
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    Default Re: Settings on a 35mm

    Quote Originally Posted by eng_keow
    Try this link. It seems quite helpful if you do not have the original manual.

    http://www.butkus.org/chinon/cm-4s/cm-4s.htm

    Tells wat shutter to use. Looks like u set the shutter speed according to the ambient lighting and adjust the aperture till you get the LED lighting in the middle.

    hope this helps
    Wow. I did google on it but i didn't know i could find something like that!

    Haha that surely helped a little. But my LED lighting just can't get to the correct exposure unless it's in the sun.

    Thing is, if i decided to use flash and LED displays under-exposed, it should turn out okay right? I mean if it's correct exposure and i use flash, it might over-expose? *shrug*

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    Member eng_keow's Avatar
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    Default Re: Settings on a 35mm

    Quote Originally Posted by tomism
    But my LED lighting just can't get to the correct exposure unless it's in the sun.

    Thing is, if i decided to use flash and LED displays under-exposed, it should turn out okay right? I mean if it's correct exposure and i use flash, it might over-expose? *shrug*
    This is cos u r using asa 200. only good for outdoor photography. Forget about the flash for the moment. Juz experiment outdoor on a good day and see what happens.

    Then tell us and we'll help u with the flash.
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    Default Re: Settings on a 35mm

    Quote Originally Posted by eng_keow
    This is cos u r using asa 200. only good for outdoor photography. Forget about the flash for the moment. Juz experiment outdoor on a good day and see what happens.

    Then tell us and we'll help u with the flash.
    Haha, call me a paranoid; i just took 7 shots of different aperture settings on a same subject for a self-study of aperture differences under room-light condition.

    Will try to get outdoor shoots and update!

    But since there are 36 exposures in the film.. think i might take a while.

    Flash got to wait then!

    Thanks a million mate.

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    Default Re: Settings on a 35mm

    If you can't get the led light to the middle, then most probably your picture is underexposed. if you have already maxed out your aperture, then you will have to reduce your shutter progressively until the led centers. If you then find the shutter speed too low to handhold, you can always increase it and underexpose your pictures. This is called pushing your film. But you will have to inform the lab technician that you have pushed your film and by how much.
    Points to note for pushing film:
    1. You have to push the entire roll by the same amount
    2. pushing anything above 2 stops results in noticable grain increase

  9. #9

    Default Re: Settings on a 35mm

    First, put the camera down for a while and learn about exposure and how ISO, aperture and shutter speed interact. Then once you start to understand the theory of exposure you can start playing with the camera and apply what you have learned. A good way to do this to begin with is to write down your exposure settings and then use these when reviewing your prints, this will help to match experience with theory.
    sk.images, ex - cyber_m0nkey

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    Default Re: Settings on a 35mm

    Quote Originally Posted by cyber_m0nkey
    A good way to do this to begin with is to write down your exposure settings and then use these when reviewing your prints, this will help to match experience with theory.
    That's what i did. Thanks for reinforcing, else i think i'll be doing it in vain.


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    Default Re: Settings on a 35mm

    Quote Originally Posted by tomism
    is there a fixed rule? Or is it judging by experience?
    Cheers!
    can try the sunny 16 rule

    http://www.camerareview.com/templates/sunny16.cfm

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