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Thread: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

  1. #21
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    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    the reason why private transport is preferred and that there're so many cars in U.S. is because it's impossible to travel between places without one as they are far away from one another. the reason why places are far away from one another is because during and after the inter-war periods, out of sheer fear of external aggressions the U.S. government undertook the policy to spread development out as much as possible, that's where the amazing gridal Federal Highway system came about, and also resulting in huge spans of sub-urban landscape. it's a totally different environment, there's no ground for comparison with Singapore.

  2. #22
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    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    I think the writer intended the comparison to be between us and major US cities.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    That was my thinking too. City to City.

  4. #24

    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum
    Have you ever been to the United States? If you did, you'll know it is almost impossible to get around most US cities without a car. Keep in mind that their public transport system is not as efficient as ours.

    I stayed in the US for almost 10 years, and it is common that most families there own at least two or three cars.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum
    Comfort? What comfort? Try grocery shopping without a car, especially during winter or summer, and see how long can you last without one.

    Taking public transport there is simply not practical, unless you are willing to wait under freezing cold or brazing hot weather for one or two hours. And of course, if you are willing to do grocery shopping for 4 hours, going through several transits before reaching your apartment. If this is what you want, then go ahead, use public transport!

    Not that I never took public transport before. Yours truly, me, had been taking the Metro bus for 4 years before getting my own car.

    The very reason that public transport is not efficently available is that the idea lacks political support, meaning it only has the support of the overwhelming majority of the population, but not from the sources that politically supported the Government. Sources that wish to create chaos in MiddleEast, Africa and South America. Sources that wish to make countries, that are rich in natural resources, to stay as "failed states." With that achieved, countries with superpower like America would have a better chance to step in politically with the UN into these countries, that were labelled as "failed states." Failed States, which is conjured by the American government and it's foreign policy arm, is a controversial term intended to mean a weak state in which the central government has little practical control over much of its territory.

    So who are these Sources? They are undeniable the very oil companies, pharmaceutical cartels and weapon manufacturers, which populated all over America and Europe.

    America not only invaded these countries to "save" the innocents from the tyrants or the so called terrorists or dictators, they have also securely pathed a way for oil companies to come in with their drills.

    So tell me, why would these companies support the government in building an efficient public transport in California? Which is the state that has the highest gas prices, the highest numbers of automotives and the highest index in pollution.

    The government has made the system and culture in a way that even people with minimum wage could afford a car, which is of course a cheap used car that could be as old as 20 years or more. With that in mind and coupling it with an inefficient public transport, what you get is a nation that is hungry for oil and automotive.

    You may disagree with me and say that it is hard to get around even with an excellent public transport system. But you must keep in mind that Public transport system is catered for the masses, and definitely not the riches. All you need is at most one or two cars per household to manage trips like grocery shoppings or family outings, and not 4 cars to a household. Just take a look at NYC. People is surviving there with their public train system, which is more efficient than Singapore. The subway literally has a station every 2 to 3 blocks, and each station has a underground network that reaches out to anywhere that needs a 5 to 10 minutes walk.

    You must undertand that the America's economy is heavily driven by oil, drugs and automotive industries, and not to mention war too. That is why MiddleEast, S. America and Africa have to stay in chaos. If they are allowed to developed into an able civilization, not only that they would claim rights to their natural resources, there would be also no more reasons to invade them. And especially when China is growing at such an alarming rate and oil is the only factor that is slowing her down.

    Yesterday they called themselves Oil companies. Today they are Energy companies. The next thing to capitalize is water and hydrogen. And the vicious cycle continues.

    But that is the reality. The reality, which only those who play the dirtiest survive. And the reality is America is playing the dirtiest. But would the world be a better place if America is not the world police? It may not be, but there is a chance.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    i see all these action going to and fro...very entertaining and humourous..
    its so different thought.. ya got to live here to know it.
    Regards, Mark Pang
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  6. #26

    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    Quote Originally Posted by triotary
    America not only invaded these countries to "save" the innocents from the tyrants or the so called terrorists or dictators, they have also securely pathed a way for oil companies to come in with their drills.
    I like this statement of yours.

  7. #27

    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    IMHO, the United States can never learn from us. Simply because both political systems operates very differently, and our small land area compared to theirs. Not to mention other factors such as city and housing plannings, etc...

  8. #28

    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    Quote Originally Posted by triotary
    But that is the reality. The reality, which only those who play the dirtiest survive. And the reality is America is playing the dirtiest. But would the world be a better place if America is not the world police? It may not be, but there is a chance.


    That's why there is a love-hate relationship between the US and the rest of the world. Of course, there are some extremists who feel nothing but hate. These are so-called terrorists, or foes of the world.

  9. #29
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    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    Quote Originally Posted by eikin
    the reason why private transport is preferred and that there're so many cars in U.S. is because it's impossible to travel between places without one as they are far away from one another. the reason why places are far away from one another is because during and after the inter-war periods, out of sheer fear of external aggressions the U.S. government undertook the policy to spread development out as much as possible, that's where the amazing gridal Federal Highway system came about, and also resulting in huge spans of sub-urban landscape. it's a totally different environment, there's no ground for comparison with Singapore.
    That's why you see more car chase in Amercian movies than good guys chasing baddies on a MTR.

  10. #30

    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum
    Comfort? What comfort? Try grocery shopping without a car, especially during winter or summer, and see how long can you last without one.

    Taking public transport there is simply not practical, unless you are willing to wait under freezing cold or brazing hot weather for one or two hours. And of course, if you are willing to do grocery shopping for 4 hours, going through several transits before reaching your apartment. If this is what you want, then go ahead, use public transport!

    Not that I never took public transport before. Yours truly, me, had been taking the Metro bus for 4 years before getting my own car.
    i did that on my bicycle during winter! lol.. had to seek shelter once in a while he enroute to the grocery store.. having said that.. a car is a necessity over there.
    Last edited by Lenscapes; 16th August 2006 at 11:11 AM.

  11. #31

    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    Yes i've been to the US before. Both Bay Area and New York. I didn't have a car but borrowed when I had to do groceries. In the Bay Area I used the BART and when I REALLY had to, public buses. New York was ok without a car. Just used the subway.

  12. #32

    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenscapes
    i did that on my bicycle during winter! lol.. had to seek shelter once in a while he enroute to the grocery store.. having said that.. a car is a necessity over there.
    Understandable.... I cycled 2.5 miles to Wal-Mart twice a week for 4 years all seasons.
    Last edited by photobum; 16th August 2006 at 12:30 PM.

  13. #33

    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum
    Understandable.... I cycled 2.5 miles to Wal-Mart twice a week for 4 years all seasons.
    which state were you in?

  14. #34
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    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    OT a bit here but...

    Did you notice the long line of cars last year trying to flee from Katrina?
    Many ran out of fuel while stuck in the traffic and were eventually abandoned...
    Then a thought occurred to me, "Where are the bicycles?"
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  15. #35

    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenscapes
    which state were you in?
    Rochester, NY (to attend college), and Chicago, IL (to work) 5 years later.
    Last edited by photobum; 17th August 2006 at 08:03 AM.

  16. #36

    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    Quote Originally Posted by Ally
    OT a bit here but...

    Did you notice the long line of cars last year trying to flee from Katrina?
    Many ran out of fuel while stuck in the traffic and were eventually abandoned...
    Then a thought occurred to me, "Where are the bicycles?"
    Unlike us Asians and some Europeans (eg: Germans), the Americans never consider bicycle as a form of transportation. Bicycles are used mainly for leisure purposes.

  17. #37

    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    Can't really carry your possessions on a bicycle, nor members of your family. And if it's a Hurricane... well you need to get pretty darn far which your average person would not be able to.

  18. #38
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    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    Quote Originally Posted by triotary
    The very reason that public transport is not efficently available is that the idea lacks political support, meaning it only has the support of the overwhelming majority of the population, but not from the sources that politically supported the Government. Sources that wish to create chaos in MiddleEast, Africa and South America. Sources that wish to make countries, that are rich in natural resources, to stay as "failed states." With that achieved, countries with superpower like America would have a better chance to step in politically with the UN into these countries, that were labelled as "failed states." Failed States, which is conjured by the American government and it's foreign policy arm, is a controversial term intended to mean a weak state in which the central government has little practical control over much of its territory.

    So who are these Sources? They are undeniable the very oil companies, pharmaceutical cartels and weapon manufacturers, which populated all over America and Europe.

    America not only invaded these countries to "save" the innocents from the tyrants or the so called terrorists or dictators, they have also securely pathed a way for oil companies to come in with their drills.

    So tell me, why would these companies support the government in building an efficient public transport in California? Which is the state that has the highest gas prices, the highest numbers of automotives and the highest index in pollution.

    The government has made the system and culture in a way that even people with minimum wage could afford a car, which is of course a cheap used car that could be as old as 20 years or more. With that in mind and coupling it with an inefficient public transport, what you get is a nation that is hungry for oil and automotive.

    You may disagree with me and say that it is hard to get around even with an excellent public transport system. But you must keep in mind that Public transport system is catered for the masses, and definitely not the riches. All you need is at most one or two cars per household to manage trips like grocery shoppings or family outings, and not 4 cars to a household. Just take a look at NYC. People is surviving there with their public train system, which is more efficient than Singapore. The subway literally has a station every 2 to 3 blocks, and each station has a underground network that reaches out to anywhere that needs a 5 to 10 minutes walk.

    You must undertand that the America's economy is heavily driven by oil, drugs and automotive industries, and not to mention war too. That is why MiddleEast, S. America and Africa have to stay in chaos. If they are allowed to developed into an able civilization, not only that they would claim rights to their natural resources, there would be also no more reasons to invade them. And especially when China is growing at such an alarming rate and oil is the only factor that is slowing her down.

    Yesterday they called themselves Oil companies. Today they are Energy companies. The next thing to capitalize is water and hydrogen. And the vicious cycle continues.

    But that is the reality. The reality, which only those who play the dirtiest survive. And the reality is America is playing the dirtiest. But would the world be a better place if America is not the world police? It may not be, but there is a chance.
    What a balanced treatise.......NOT!

    Plenty of failed states that didn't need the US to help on their way. You would imagine that if the US had a hand in de-stabilising Somalia, Angola and innumerable other African/ME countries, it would have been in their interests to at least keep them friendly to the west, would it not? Please name 1 that isn't openly hostile to the US and its allies? At the very least the US would have avoided having to send troops overseas, with the inevitable political fallout at home, right? Btw, would you prefer that Iran and North Korea had their way and develop/procure nuclear weapons? Would you claim that the US has a hand in keeping N.Korea 'failed' as well, to the detriment of the security of itself and allies (e.g. Japan).

    Your arguments are typical of those with a reflex dislike of US foreign policy. You exaggerate (i.e. 4 cars/household? Exceptional and surely not the average), apportion blame inappropriately (govt engenders a culture so that minimum wage earners can afford a car? How is that a government's fault?), and build up tenous conspiracy theories blaming all the usual "bad guys". Suddenly, you see all the ghosts in the shadows, and you can rationalise every contradiction in your argument away in the name of a conspiracy, but are desperately short of any real facts or logic.
    Last edited by dkw; 18th August 2006 at 11:46 AM.

  19. #39

    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum
    Rochester, NY (to attend college), and Chicago, IL (to work) 5 years later.
    ooo... brrrr... too cold up north..
    i was at the southern tip of illinois

  20. #40

    Default Re: USA Today - US can learn a few things from Singapore

    Quote Originally Posted by triotary
    But that is the reality. The reality, which only those who play the dirtiest survive. And the reality is America is playing the dirtiest. But would the world be a better place if America is not the world police? It may not be, but there is a chance.
    Well, I for one will agree that the United States is not a boy scout and had some nasty skeleton in the closet. However, I wonder what the world will be like, if the United States did not step up to the plate, to assume the role as the world policeman.

    Will the world be a better place? triotary and his bunch of US basher definately think so, but I am not sure, because we will never know.

    What I know is, if the United States maintained its isolationist foreign policy, favoured by many at the turn of the 20th century, and after the Great War, the world will be a very different place.

    Take for example, WW2. The isolationist ruled, and Japan did not blunder into Pearl Harbour, the United States stayed out of the conflict, I wonder what is Changi Prison going to look like today? I also know that the massacre in Nanking will never swee the light of day? And Singapore, well, which is worse, the Union Jack or the Rising Sun?

    If Clinton did not force the issue and move against the Serb in Bosnia, the genocide would have contineud. Without the United States direct involvement and initiatives, even though it's in Europe's back yard, the European political leadership had dropped the ball on this one, failing to do anything. Well, the US led the bombing in Bosnia and Serbia, if that did not happenned, the Serb's will continue it's genocoide in Bosnia. So, should the US gets involve?

    Oh, remember Aceh? After the tsunami hit, the United States Navy dispatched a carrier task force to the secen immediately, to help rescue efforts, help recovery and provide security. At what cost, $35 million a day. The United States government willingly provide the resources, and the American people supported the actions and efforts.

    I again say, the United States made lots of mistake, Cuba, Vietnam, Iraq, just to name a few. But, do also remember Changi!
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