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Thread: light meter

  1. #21

    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by Halfmoon
    I am just curious...

    What are some of the functions of the light meters???

    As in what function does it have and what can it do...

    Beside noting the aperature, and shutter speed...
    It allows you to measure light ratios also.

  2. #22

    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by Halfmoon
    I am just curious...

    What are some of the functions of the light meters???

    As in what function does it have and what can it do...

    Beside noting the aperature, and shutter speed...

    Light meters measure light, either light falling on the subject, or light reflecting from the subject.

    Light meters translate the light values into aperture, shutter speed, and sometimes EV.

    They have no other function.

    It is like what functions has a knife got? Simple. It cuts. What you do with the cutting function of the knife is totally up to you. You can use it to pare the fruits, cut the meat, make beautiful sculptures from vegetables, or to kill.

    You can use the light values to make "correct exposures", "incorrect exposures", understand the values of light from different parts of the scene (Some light meters do this better than others - light ratios as described by photobum), and in B&W photography, how to process the negatives to make the negatives you want.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Halfmoon's Avatar
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    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by student
    It is like what functions has a knife got? Simple. It cuts. What you do with the cutting function of the knife is totally up to you. You can use it to pare the fruits, cut the meat, make beautiful sculptures from vegetables, or to kill.

    You can use the light values to make "correct exposures", "incorrect exposures", understand the values of light from different parts of the scene (Some light meters do this better than others - light ratios as described by photobum), and in B&W photography, how to process the negatives to make the negatives you want.
    I like the way you phrase your words... a knife that allow the artist to crave out his artistic work!!! Cool!!!

    Thanks Student for your sharing... I am not sure if I will be using film to try out... It is possible to use camera in-bulit meter to read the studio lighting???

    This is getting more interesting for novice me....

    Thanks to all who answer my quries..... does anyone know what light meter is Ruby selling??
    Art is perception; Perception is art.

  4. #24

    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by Halfmoon
    I like the way you phrase your words... a knife that allow the artist to crave out his artistic work!!! Cool!!!
    Let me add, I use a knife to shave every morning.

    I ever used a handheld spot meter and doubles as a densitometer.

  5. #25

    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum
    Let me add, I use a knife to shave every morning.
    Respect!

    Reminds me of "Siow Li Fei Tau"

  6. #26
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    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by Halfmoon
    does anyone know what light meter is Ruby selling??
    Can't remember exactly think it is sekonic L3xx.

    YMMV

  7. #27

    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by student
    Respect!

    Reminds me of "Siow Li Fei Tau"
    Nothing much lah.... BUT do remember to lather well with lots of soap. Otherwise, nasty razar burns!
    Last edited by photobum; 23rd August 2006 at 10:28 PM.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Halfmoon's Avatar
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    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum
    Let me add, I use a knife to shave every morning.

    I ever used a handheld spot meter and doubles as a densitometer.
    Wah..... Dunn tell me you also collect knife, sword, survival knifes, etc????

    Interesting.... densitometer... I checked it out... thanks for this tip....
    Art is perception; Perception is art.

  9. #29
    Senior Member Halfmoon's Avatar
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    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by longkangman
    Can't remember exactly think it is sekonic L3xx.

    YMMV
    Sekonic model.... ok thanks... I will check it out...

    Is this a must for shooting with strobes???

    I know must shoot full manual... something that is much relax in studio compared to shoot sports photography with full manual.... tried it and not much success....
    Art is perception; Perception is art.

  10. #30

    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by Halfmoon
    Wah..... Dunn tell me you also collect knife, sword, survival knifes, etc????

    Interesting.... densitometer... I checked it out... thanks for this tip....
    My other hobby, besides photography and Hi-Fi, is gourmet cooking. Many years ago, I took short courses in French cooking and pastry at the Chicago School of Culinary Arts. Thus, I was awarded a diploma in French Culinary Arts - Grade 2 (roughly equivalent to NITEC 1 certification at SHATEC).

    And yes, I love my Henckels and Wusthofs.
    Last edited by photobum; 24th August 2006 at 07:47 AM.

  11. #31

    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by Halfmoon
    Sekonic model.... ok thanks... I will check it out...

    Is this a must for shooting with strobes???

    I know must shoot full manual... something that is much relax in studio compared to shoot sports photography with full manual.... tried it and not much success....
    Yes, a handheld light meter is a must when using studio strobes.

    FYI, I had shot sports with my Nikon F3, fully maunal. For me, I can focus much faster than an AF camera.

  12. #32
    Senior Member Halfmoon's Avatar
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    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum
    Yes, a handheld light meter is a must when using studio strobes.

    FYI, I had shot sports with my Nikon F3, fully maunal. For me, I can focus much faster than an AF camera.
    Thanks photobum..... Then, a light meter is what I will buy...

    Cool.... hahaha... maybe if I have a chance, I should try that out too!!
    Art is perception; Perception is art.

  13. #33
    Senior Member Halfmoon's Avatar
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    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum
    My other hobby, besides photography and Hi-Fi, is gourmet cooking. Many years ago, I took short courses in French cooking and pastry at the Chicago School of Culinary Arts. Thus, I was awarded a diploma in French Culinary Arts - Grade 2 (roughly equivalent to NITEC 1 certification at SHATEC).

    And yes, I love my Henckels and Wusthofs.
    You have very quite unique taste.... To me, any sound is good enough... never know how to appreciate the hi fi much....

    What is a Henckels and Wusthofs???

    My hobby... used to be reading, but work took up too much time to do much nowadays....
    Art is perception; Perception is art.

  14. #34

    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by Halfmoon
    What is a Henckels and Wusthofs???
    Henckels and Wusthof are German cutlery brand name. Their top-of-line knives cost as much as a DSLR body (say the Nikon D70s or Canon EOS 350).

    Yes, the $1,300 Wusthof Culinar 7" Santoku knife is one of my all-time favorite cutting tool.
    Last edited by photobum; 25th August 2006 at 01:16 PM.

  15. #35
    Senior Member Halfmoon's Avatar
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    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum
    Henckels and Wusthof are German cutlery brand name. Their top-of-line knives cost as much as a DSLR body (say the Nikon D70s or Canon EOS 350).

    Yes, the $1,300 Wusthof Culinar 7" Santoku knife is one of my all-time favorite cutting tool.
    Wah.......... $1300 for a knife??????
    Art is perception; Perception is art.

  16. #36

    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by Halfmoon
    Wah.......... $1300 for a knife??????

    Major OT!!

    Excellent stuff! These knives, I mean.

    I like knives! I like the way they are made. But tell me, photobum, how do you compare these German goodies to the best of the Japanese?

  17. #37

    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by student
    Major OT!!

    Excellent stuff! These knives, I mean.

    I like knives! I like the way they are made. But tell me, photobum, how do you compare these German goodies to the best of the Japanese?
    You will be surpised to know that the best of German knives are manufactured OEM in Japan.

    The true traditional Japanese knives are very good too, except you'll require the 'know-hows' to sharpen them to a 45-degree cutting angle. (I don't recommend anyone without the proper knowledge to try sharpen their own knives)

    For me, I usually sent my knives for sharpening at Mr DIY at the basement level of Bukit Timah Plaza. They are the only folks in town who knows how to sharpen my Japanese knives without damaging them.

    I love those hand-horned traditional Japanese knives. These knife-makers are truely master craftmen. I own a $1,500 Ichiro Hattori 32cm Rujiki slicing knife (which I bought from Tokyo), Very exclusive stuff indeed. Like a well-made precision Swiss watch. Its handle and blade are truly work of art. For those who are don't know who Ichiro Hattori is, he is the finest knife maker (not to be confused with swords) in modern Japan. His so-called 'economical' HD series knives are equally expensive; the cheapest being the 9cm paring knife which costs about $200.
    Last edited by photobum; 26th August 2006 at 08:41 AM.

  18. #38

    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum
    You will be surpised to know that the best of German knives are manufactured OEM in Japan.

    The true traditional Japanese knives are very good too, except you'll require the 'know-hows' to sharpen them to a 45-degree cutting angle. (I don't recommend anyone without the proper knowledge to try sharpen their own knives)

    For me, I usually sent my knives for sharpening at Mr DIY at the basement level of Bukit Timah Plaza. They are the only folks in town who knows how to sharpen my Japanese knives without damaging them.

    I love those hand-horned traditional Japanese knives. These knife-makers are truely master craftmen. I own a $1,500 Ichiro Hattori 32cm Rujiki slicing knife (which I bought from Tokyo), Very exclusive stuff indeed. Like a well-made precision Swiss watch. Its handle and blade are truly work of art. For those who are don't know who Ichiro Hattori is, he is the finest knife maker (not to be confused with swords) in modern Japan. His so-called 'economical' HD series knives are equally expensive; the cheapest being the 9cm paring knife which costs about $200.

    Wow!

    Although I had seen and handled the German stuff and they are good, there is just something very special about these Japanese knives. Esthetically beautiful! Works of art!

  19. #39

    Default Re: light meter

    Quote Originally Posted by student
    ....there is just something very special about these Japanese knives.
    You are absolutely right! Japanese knives are special. Most people will think that a knife is a knife, no big deal. These knives are more than just cutting tools, I'll consider them a fine piece of artwork. Each hand-horned Japanese knife tells a story about its maker. It takes days to create a truth masterpiece. I recalled that I had to place an order for the Hattori slicing knife 2 weeks in advance. Mr Hattori handed the knife and certificate of authenticity to me in person. Each knife he makes is unique and 'only one of a kind', it definitely beats the mass production industry in today's society.
    Last edited by photobum; 27th August 2006 at 07:23 AM.

  20. #40
    Senior Member Halfmoon's Avatar
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    Default Re: light meter

    I wonder how much does a sharpen Japanese sword cost??? I think it might cost some $3000K plus..... I think it is a nice display item......

    I do not know much about knives since I do not cook... but I seen a lot of Japanese and German mass produced knives, but guess there mass products are not so quality... and the price should tell a story.......

    Just a question... does students also like to cook too?? Like photobum???

    How about opening a cafe for Photographers??? lol....
    Art is perception; Perception is art.

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