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Thread: Phototaking experience for events

  1. #1

    Wink Phototaking experience for events

    Calling all snappers to share their experiences in covering events like wedding, D&D, anything that requires photographers to be there...would like all to share your favourite film, settings, lens, style of shots etc...so that we all can learn from each other....

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    erm i tried phototaking at a christmas party. it was a lighting nightmare as one lamp in the SAME hall was tungsten whilst the other was cool blue flourescent. ended up using flash for every pict...haven't buy external flash yet boh bian use internal one. set it to pgm mode coz i wanted spontaneous picts...gave up on red eye reduction flash coz it was too S-L-o-W. switched to fill flash instead and had to touch up wiff PS lorr. one thing tho...best is to use EVF if you have coz holding it that way would be more stable. some picts turned out blurry due to handshake.
    Believe it. And it will be so.

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    My favourite film of choice for such things like wedding dinners, indoor events, etc is Press 800. If it need be, push it to 1600.
    If ceiling is available, try to use bounce flash. Use Manual mode and set to something like 1/60 f/4 or 1/30 f/4 if you can handhold well. For dances, you might want to drop it to 1/4 or 1/8, set flash to 2nd curtain sync and you'll get some cool effects.

    Regards
    CK

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    Originally posted by ckiang
    My favourite film of choice for such things like wedding dinners, indoor events, etc is Press 800. If it need be, push it to 1600.
    me too!!! my fave indoor film, along with NPH400 if the lighting is good and strong...

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    wa.....use so pro negatives......i use only superia 400 enough liao......i go 1/30 at f5.6 or f2.8 with my SB-28 ......on a case on case basics......

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    Originally posted by roti
    wa.....use so pro negatives......i use only superia 400 enough liao......i go 1/30 at f5.6 or f2.8 with my SB-28 ......on a case on case basics......
    I tried Superia XTRA 400 twice, colour saturation a bit too much.

    Regards
    CK

  7. #7

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    Covered an indoor sports event where no flash was allowed. Had to resort to a 50mm f1.7 and Fujifilm Xtra 800. Managed to get shutter speeds of 1/125-1/500 required to capture the action. Missed the ability to zoom for some action shots but was more than adequate when covering the ceremonies, prize-presentation.....etc. Using a prime forces you to run around ALOT though.

  8. #8

    Default standard formula

    the standard formula for all kinds of events is:

    (1) ISO 400. there is no need for ISO800/1600 etc. if u need ISO 800&faster it means the place is too dark. if so then the best way to expose for a dark surrounding is to meter and then put -1 to -1.5 stop for background and if there is a main subject, use direct flash with flash on -1/3 or -1/2 stop.
    (2) u only need the 28-70/2.8 (or 17-35/2.8 for digital body)& the 80-200/2.8 & 2X extender
    (3) optional items: 50/1.4, 300/2.8 (with monopod), second body
    (4) no need tripod
    (5) shoot the "standard" wide-angle shots and telephoto shots 1st to cover your requirement, then later can shoot those " funky/experimental/creative shots

    have fun ;-)

  9. #9

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    So far all that have been discussed is film SLR. Has anyone tried DSLR instead? What's the outcome so far?

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    Originally posted by nEkOgOtCh
    So far all that have been discussed is film SLR. Has anyone tried DSLR instead? What's the outcome so far?
    DSLR would be very advantageous in such situations, with it's image preview and variable ISO. Only trouble is getting a lens wide enough.

    Regards
    CK

  11. #11
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    Default Re: standard formula

    Originally posted by clive
    the standard formula for all kinds of events is:

    (1) ISO 400. there is no need for ISO800/1600 etc. if u need ISO 800&faster it means the place is too dark. if so then the best way to expose for a dark surrounding is to meter and then put -1 to -1.5 stop for background and if there is a main subject, use direct flash with flash on -1/3 or -1/2 stop.
    I would propose that the "standard" suggested by Clive by used as a possible guideline only, and one of several to be borne in mind. I couldn't honestly pretend that there is a "standard" way of shooting a lot of things, particularly something as diverse as event work (not even a specific type of event work has been specified).

    With events, usually the plan goes out the window after 10s.

    Only needing ISO400 is one of those luxuries afforded to photographers who lead sheltered lives. I shoot outdoors and need ISO1600. I stress the word *need*. There are plenty of good reasons to use ISO800 or 1600 even if it's not absolutely necessary. For starters, shooting on the limit with flash with ISO400 means that by switching to ISO800, you get twice as many flashes with your set of batteries, and your flash recycles more than twice as fast as with the slower film speed.

    "If u need ISO 800&faster it means the place is too dark". Okay, so the place is too dark. As an event photographer you can't go, "the place is to dark", pack up and go home. You have to get the pictures regardless. ISO 800 is one stop difference in ambient lighting compared to ISO 400. If you feel up to shooting ISO 400 and delivering dark backgrounds, so be it.

    Another very good reason to shoot ISO800 is that ISO800 emulsions these days are absolutely stunning. Why cripple yourself if your target output size is well within reach of the faster emulsions? Compare the films at your disposal and make your tradeoffs. I would stick to EI400 with the D1 because the EI800 setting was poor. I have no problems whatsoever going to EI800 with the D1x or D100.

    Another brilliant reason is depth of field. One stop more can make a perceptible difference. There's no point getting a high quality ISO400 shot that doesn't have the subjects in focus.

    (2) u only need the 28-70/2.8 (or 17-35/2.8 for digital body)& the 80-200/2.8 & 2X extender

    Next, I personally wouldn't hazard to recommend "only" needing two lenses to do a job. And if I had to recommend two, I would recommend a 17-35 and 80-200, regardless of film or dig, contrary to Clive's recommendation of the 28-70.
    I personally have no idea where a 2x converter would fit into the scheme of things, certainly not indoors anyway, I struggle to see how a 1.4x would be useful let alone a 2x.

    (3) optional items: 50/1.4, 300/2.8 (with monopod), second body

    Optional to whom? Each photographer must be allowed to develop their own style and requirements. This goes for the "needed" lenses as well as the optionals. Personally, I would find an 85/1.4 more useful than either of those two lenses. And probably a 28/1.4 or 35/1.4 over the 50/1.4 as well, but any f1.4 lens is an asset indoors. Aside from that at events I have used, and I say this so oft it gets a bit benign with use, 14mm through to 500/4 indoors. No doubt there are perfectly valid ways to go even shorter and longer.

    (4) no need tripod
    (5) shoot the "standard" wide-angle shots and telephoto shots 1st to cover your requirement, then later can shoot those " funky/experimental/creative shots


    Agree on these points.

    Just to furnish my own shooting style (emphasis on my, and style). As in, you copy at your own risk, it's not guaranteed to work for you.

    17-35 and 80-200 class lenses, the faster the better. One camera, two preferable. Flash on each camera. ISO 400-1600, the slower the better but don't go slower than you need to (as opposed to, don't go faster than you need to). This is a minimum setup.

    The alternative which I prefer is to have one camera with flash with the zoom mounted, and the second body with no flash with a fast prime. Obviously the lenses should be complementary, for example a 28/1.4 to substitute the 17-35, or an 85/1.4 or 135/2 to substitute the 80-200.

  12. #12

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    Originally posted by nEkOgOtCh
    So far all that have been discussed is film SLR. Has anyone tried DSLR instead? What's the outcome so far?
    No DSLR yet.

    But for a similar event as the one mentioned above, I had to fall back on my 602 operating at ISO1600 and underexposed 1 stop to get the same 1/500s to freeze the action. Being able to preview and to shoot at 5fps with reckless abandon was a big advantage. I caught many more shots with this than with my film SLR with measely 3.3fps(without motordrive).

    In situations when one is constrained by not being able to use flash, ISO800 would be my operating minimum to avoid any foulup. I'd take a little more grain any day rather than to fail to capture a good shot.

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    Originally posted by nEkOgOtCh
    So far all that have been discussed is film SLR. Has anyone tried DSLR instead? What's the outcome so far?
    me... used ISO400 or 640 for low-light indoor shots with flash, mounted my sick-ma 15-30mm, results were quite ok. the problem with shooting digital for events is that there's heck of a lot of post-processing work. gimme a SLR + Press 800 anytime. (ok ok so i'm a lazy bum... )

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    Default At weddings

    For weddings, I was introduced to the NPC/NPS/NPH films by my friend and I agree they give good skin tones. (After reading this thread I'll be waiting to try Press 800 too.)

    If I'm the main photographer (which is scary), I bring two bodies, one AF and one manual (as backup). And I hope my shoulders last!

    I try to dress formally (e.g. tie) as it's a wedding after all.

    I try to capture:
    = special looks and glances
    = important people (relatives, close friends...)
    = special details (decorations, wedding certificate)
    = the key moments (of course)
    = moments which the couple will not be able to see on that day

    One of the main things I try to do is predict what will happen next, and position myself before it happens so I can get the shot.

    Another thing I do is try to be as unobtrusive as I can. I believe the wedding photographer should avoid being in the way, especially where main family members are concerned. He/she should also not become the focus of attention!

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    Default Re: At weddings

    Originally posted by d7t3
    I try to dress formally (e.g. tie) as it's a wedding after all.
    wah good for you!!!

    i've seen way too many wedding photographers shoot @ the dinner dressed like they're going to the wet market. i've always believed that a paid photographer should dress professionally. personally i'd just put on a clean pressed long-sleeved shirt and pants without the tie (it's waaaay too hot to run around in a tie), unless it's a really formal event. i've even shot a event decked out in a full suit (stipulation from the event), and that was no joke... almost died of heat stroke. thank goodness for air conditioning...

  16. #16

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    Originally posted by Zerstorer


    No DSLR yet.

    I had to fall back on my 602 operating at ISO1600 and underexposed 1 stop to get the same 1/500s to freeze the action.

    Just would like to know...why must underexposed 1 stop?

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    Originally posted by Paladin



    Just would like to know...why must underexposed 1 stop?
    if not, it'll be 1/250s and may not be able freeze the action (karate or taekwando I think)....
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

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