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Thread: catching cats in action

  1. #1
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    Default catching cats in action

    hi guys..i'm trying to get shots of my cats playing..
    but the camera is never fast enuff to catch the moments i want..
    i'm using shutter prority mode..using a speed of 1/ 10... any faster and the pics turn out dark..
    i'm using a 602..

    ps advice on suitable mode and settings..
    tks!

  2. #2

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    To freeze motion, you will need at least 1/(2*focal length) shutter speeds. Generally about 1/500 is required for most situations.

    To get that, you will either need large aperture, bright lighting or high ISO(>400) or any combination of the 3.

    Alternatively, you could mount an external flash and then shoot at high shutter speeds effortlessly.

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    so the key is in getting an ext flash?

  4. #4

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    Originally posted by jherek
    so the key is in getting an ext flash?
    the key is a window with sunlight streaming in.

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    Basically, I think that what you need is such.

    1) Catch cats in action = high speed.
    2) Adequate lighting to ensure higher shutter speed is available.

    So I think that whether or not you get a flash is not important but you must have enough lighting... though that usually means flash.
    Or you could try a damn bloody fast film.

    Am I making any sense at all??

  6. #6

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    ever heard of HSS flash ? It means High Speed Sync Flash. It will help you to freeze action when the nature light is not bright enough.

    If you don't have a HSS flash, then the only choice is to use higher ISO and big aperture(small F number).

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    Originally posted by Zerstorer
    To freeze motion, you will need at least 1/(2*focal length) shutter speeds. Generally about 1/500 is required for most situations.
    Nice theory, shame it doesn't stand the acid test of real life useage

    The reality is that the shutter speed required is entirely dependent on the following factors:

    1) Subject velocity expressed in terms of angular movement.

    2) Acceptable circle of confusion that the photographer deems as being suitable.

    3) Distance from lens to subject*

    4) Prefered apeture

    5) Lighting conditions, including the use of flash.

    *These are inter-related. Example: A fast moving object at a great distance from the lens will have a lower apparent angular movement per time unit than a slower object that is very close to the lens.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

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    Hi thanks for all the advice..but i dun get these..


    *you will need at least 1/(2*focal length) shutter speeds

    *Acceptable circle of confusion that the photographer deems as being suitable.

    mind explaining...?
    Last edited by jherek; 1st January 2003 at 04:55 PM.

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    Originally posted by ninelives
    ever heard of HSS flash ? It means High Speed Sync Flash. It will help you to freeze action when the nature light is not bright enough.

    If you don't have a HSS flash, then the only choice is to use higher ISO and big aperture(small F number).

    wat type of flashes are HSS?
    perhaps give examples of models..?

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    Originally posted by jherek
    Hi thanks for all the advice..but i dun get these..

    *you will need at least 1/(2*focal length) shutter speeds
    This equation (which is not valid (see my explaination above as to why) goes like this.

    1/twice the focal length = shutter speed.

    So with a 400mm lens we get:

    1/(2 x 400) = 800 so the shutter speed required is 1/800th of a second.

    Originally posted by jherek

    *Acceptable circle of confusion that the photographer deems as being suitable.

    mind explaining...?
    The circle of confusion is a technical term to mean the smallest diameter that the human eye can resolve on a photographic print at normal viewing distance. The value varies from person to person and is normally between 0.02 and 0.033mm when viewed at a distance of 290mm. This equates to 4-6 lpm and is the limit of resolution of the human eye.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
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  11. #11

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    Hehe, how about more lights in the house? Sounds like your home is quite dark. Bump ISO to 400 while you're at it too. Errr... if you use a flash watch the reflections off your cat's eyes!

    PS. Post your pics if you're sucessful, I'd love to see them!

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    Originally posted by jherek

    wat type of flashes are HSS?
    perhaps give examples of models..?
    you don't need HSS flash. The camera can sync with any flash as fast as 1/1000s (limitations due to the flash duration). You could also set the shutter speed to 1/1000s and use your internal flash.
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

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    Originally posted by Ian


    This equation (which is not valid (see my explaination above as to why) goes like this.

    1/twice the focal length = shutter speed.

    So with a 400mm lens we get:

    1/(2 x 400) = 800 so the shutter speed required is 1/800th of a second.
    * ok so the equation is inadequate..but how do i determine my focal length esp. in a DC like my 602..?

    Originally posted by Ian

    The circle of confusion is a technical term to mean the smallest diameter that the human eye can resolve on a photographic print at normal viewing distance. The value varies from person to person and is normally between 0.02 and 0.033mm when viewed at a distance of 290mm. This equates to 4-6 lpm and is the limit of resolution of the human eye.
    * so the COC applies only in prints? erm..how do i take tt into consideration?*

    Thanks!
    Last edited by jherek; 1st January 2003 at 08:57 PM.

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    Originally posted by YSLee
    Hehe, how about more lights in the house? Sounds like your home is quite dark. Bump ISO to 400 while you're at it too. Errr... if you use a flash watch the reflections off your cat's eyes!

    PS. Post your pics if you're sucessful, I'd love to see them!
    well..haha...it was under normal room lighting ..ok ..will try out the sugestions soon..

    regarding the reflections of the cats' eyes..how do u suggest i resolve that?
    bounce the flash..?

    Thanks all.

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    Originally posted by jherek


    well..haha...it was under normal room lighting ..ok ..will try out the sugestions soon..

    regarding the reflections of the cats' eyes..how do u suggest i resolve that?
    bounce the flash..?

    Thanks all.
    Thanks to the second reflective layer in the cats eyes silver eye is a massive problem. Bounce flash is the only effective cure.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  16. #16
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    Originally posted by jherek


    * ok so the equation is inadequate..but how do i determine my focal length esp. in a DC like my 602..?
    RTFM as it will give an equivalent to 35mm lens length.
    Originally posted by jherek

    * so the COC applies only in prints? erm..how do i take tt into consideration?*
    Techinically the COC only applies to prints, however it can also be applied to emulsions and even CCD arrays, though the numbers vary.

    IF you really want to get in to this one, check elsewhere on this site, there's been several discusions about it.

    You take it in to consideration by knowing the approximate CoC you will accept. this can be done by either trial and error or experimentation.
    Last edited by Ian; 1st January 2003 at 09:46 PM.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

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