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Thread: Night shoot?

  1. #21

    Default Re: Night shoot?

    Quote Originally Posted by jeryltan
    You can't trigger slave flashes with a 420ex
    so that means i am out?

  2. #22
    Moderator ortega's Avatar
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    Default Re: Night shoot?

    nice idea

  3. #23

    Default Re: Night shoot?

    Hi all,

    There will be a night shoot. For details, please refer to http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=211784

    Thank you.

  4. #24

    Default Re: Night shoot?

    Quote Originally Posted by mohgui
    forget about doing star-trails in SG. quite difficult. there are hardly any stars in our sky and if there are, the ambient lighting is too bright.
    and clouds are everywhere...

  5. #25

    Default Re: Night shoot?

    Quote Originally Posted by jeryltan
    Shots I'm trying to achieve are similar to these





    Hi jeryltan, those are the works by Michael Frye. Have u read on his shooting techniques on these pics especially the giant cacti?

    Here's how he did it:

    "Most people think of photographs as capturing a single moment. But an image like this is created over time like a painting. I start with a blank canvas of black, unexposed film, and then add light of different colors, from different angles, bit by bit, until I've created the image I've visualized. For this photograph I used a single flash as the light source. I covered the flash first with a magenta-colored gel filter to light the left side of the middle cactus. I then repositioned the flash, changed to a blue gel, and lit the right side of this same saguaro. I moved this flash to 12 different positions, changing gels each time, to light the other cacti throughout the scene. The flash was on a light stand, and sometimes had to hide the flash and stand behind one of the cacti so it wouldn't be visible from the camera position. Each pop of flash was made as a separate exposure on the same piece of film."
    - Michael Frye


    Mamiya 645, 150mm lens, Fujichrome Provia 100 pushed one stop, Norman 400B flash with colored gels. Flash triggered by a Wein Ultra Slave, 120 exposures on the same piece of film, each 1/60sec with apertures varying between f/8 and f/16

    So now u know how it was done. You can still do it all by yrself with just one flash. Well in fact there are a couple of ways to do it which I'm sure you probably have read it on other internet sources. Get a strong search-light and an assortment of colored gels to light-paint yr subjects. Set yr camera to 'B' for long exposure and with small aperture, you can expose for a longer time, enuff for you to light-paint yr subject. It's best to use film SLR camera on manual mode. Even focussing has to be done manually.

    Here's one of the nocturne photographs I took for yr reference:


    I've yet to upload all my nocturne pics on my night photography blog site. So now everyone gets to see it first.

  6. #26

    Default Re: Night shoot?

    Wow.. Tks for the info.. Will try look for color gels and try it out soon..

    Quote Originally Posted by Mezzotint
    Hi jeryltan, those are the works by Michael Frye. Have u read on his shooting techniques on these pics especially the giant cacti?

    Here's how he did it:

    "Most people think of photographs as capturing a single moment. But an image like this is created over time like a painting. I start with a blank canvas of black, unexposed film, and then add light of different colors, from different angles, bit by bit, until I've created the image I've visualized. For this photograph I used a single flash as the light source. I covered the flash first with a magenta-colored gel filter to light the left side of the middle cactus. I then repositioned the flash, changed to a blue gel, and lit the right side of this same saguaro. I moved this flash to 12 different positions, changing gels each time, to light the other cacti throughout the scene. The flash was on a light stand, and sometimes had to hide the flash and stand behind one of the cacti so it wouldn't be visible from the camera position. Each pop of flash was made as a separate exposure on the same piece of film."
    - Michael Frye


    Mamiya 645, 150mm lens, Fujichrome Provia 100 pushed one stop, Norman 400B flash with colored gels. Flash triggered by a Wein Ultra Slave, 120 exposures on the same piece of film, each 1/60sec with apertures varying between f/8 and f/16

    So now u know how it was done. You can still do it all by yrself with just one flash. Well in fact there are a couple of ways to do it which I'm sure you probably have read it on other internet sources. Get a strong search-light and an assortment of colored gels to light-paint yr subjects. Set yr camera to 'B' for long exposure and with small aperture, you can expose for a longer time, enuff for you to light-paint yr subject. It's best to use film SLR camera on manual mode. Even focussing has to be done manually.

    Here's one of the nocturne photographs I took for yr reference:


    I've yet to upload all my nocturne pics on my night photography blog site. So now everyone gets to see it first.

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