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Thread: What is the best prime lens for portrait shooting?

  1. #21
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    Originally posted by binbeto


    And, what is the reason behind that?

    A telephoto will make a person look "better" by compressing the feature.. Not too sure what you called that... Won't have "Big nose/forehead" syndrome.
    Well, i guess it all depends how one would frame/compose the person in the photo. And your other reason being, the subject might feel intimidated due to the physical proximity, well, i reckon that can be over come.

    So thats where i guess our views differ. Nonetheless, it could be just a case of having different style of shooting, yes?
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  2. #22

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    Originally posted by Wolfgang


    This is where i beg to differ.
    maybe someone got DSLR already so his 50mm lens become 75 or 80 mm

  3. #23

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    Originally posted by Wolfgang


    Well, i guess it all depends how one would frame/compose the person in the photo. And your other reason being, the subject might feel intimidated due to the physical proximity, well, i reckon that can be over come.

    So thats where i guess our views differ. Nonetheless, it could be just a case of having different style of shooting, yes?
    Maybe you like to add.


    50mm on a DLSR will be 75/80mm liao.,...
    just nice.....

    Hehehheeee......

  4. #24

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    should change the title to "what's your favorite lens for portrait". Best lens is very subjective...

    I would have to vote for Nikkor 80-200mm f2.8. Longer lens tends to give better bokeh (just my personal preference), better than shorter focal length lens with larger aperture. Zoom is convenient to crop unwanted background. f2.8 is nice to blur the background more.
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  5. #25
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    Originally posted by Wolfgang


    Well, i guess it all depends how one would frame/compose the person in the photo. And your other reason being, the subject might feel intimidated due to the physical proximity, well, i reckon that can be over come.

    So thats where i guess our views differ. Nonetheless, it could be just a case of having different style of shooting, yes?
    Oh i see...

    The thread starter might wanna consider this. (",)

  6. #26
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    Must add a caveat:

    80-200 2.8 is a good portrait lens, but it is also a very heavy lens! I almost regretted getting mine because of this.

  7. #27

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    I've seen many cases of portraitures being taken by moderate wide angle lens (28mm & 35mm) so don't limit your creativity to the usual short telephotos for this form of photography.

    I suppose telephoto "portrait lens" are only useful if you want to take a close up facial portraits.
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  8. #28

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    Originally posted by e_liau
    Personal Opinion,

    Then I felt that the sharpness of this lens, works against my human portraitures.
    Here we go again.. any decent Nikkor will have enough sharpness to resolve said features.

    Originally posted by Wolfgang


    *Cough cough* Erm, let me practise more on my 50mm first.
    Good idea, heh, told you before if you rush ahead and buy something..

    Originally posted by BraveHart
    I've seen many cases of portraitures being taken by moderate wide angle lens (28mm & 35mm) so don't limit your creativity to the usual short telephotos for this form of photography.

    I suppose telephoto "portrait lens" are only useful if you want to take a close up facial portraits.
    Heh, that's right Hart, unfortunately most people tend to follow a very set way of thinking, ie. medium telephotos for portraits, wide angles for landscapes, etc.

    (in case you guys forgot, Ian's swedish gal is taken with a 17mm focal length)

  9. #29
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    Seems there are three main ideas,

    1). 105mm,
    2). 80mm~200mm Zoom,
    3). Do not limit ur ideas

    I will go for idea #1 cause #2 lens is a bit heavy, I saw one of my friend use it, and #3 idea is out since I am a newbie.

    Okay, anybody sell bellow lens? I try to get quotation from cathy e-quote, but no response, anybody knows the price of new?

    TELEPHOTO
    Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AIS

    Lens construction: 5 elements in 4 groups
    Closest focusing: 1m/3.5 ft.
    Filter attachment size: 52mm
    Hood: Built-in
    LIST PRICE : SIN$820
    Last edited by cd.; 1st January 2003 at 10:17 AM.

  10. #30

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    i prefer a 85mm in the studio. Anything above 105mm seems too long in the studio. For outdoor, a 105mm is nice.

  11. #31

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    I like a 35mm f/2 ourdoors for portrait. For frame fillinf I use a 100mm lens

  12. #32
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    Originally posted by mervlam
    i prefer a 85mm in the studio. Anything above 105mm seems too long in the studio. For outdoor, a 105mm is nice.
    mmm.......studio too small? if u r doing a close up......u might scare the model(not likely) or person in front(my experience).....so prefer a 105mm.....

  13. #33

    Default lets see...

    ...ah yes. 400mm. yup. then the model will look very nice.

  14. #34
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    Yes it all depends on what you want to do. This topic is oft discussed, and while you might want a simple answer, the answer isn't necessarily simple.

    The good news? You really can use whatever lens you want for portraiture. Anything from fisheyes through to supertelephotos.

    400mm is a cracking lens for portraiture. As is a 300. An 80-200. A 50. A 20. Whatever.

  15. #35
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    Default Re: lets see...

    Originally posted by clive
    ...ah yes. 400mm. yup. then the model will look very nice.
    .. I think the main beauty of using a high zoom lens is the limited depth of field. If used for outdoor shoot, the photo will look very nice with the nice bokeh background. The model will definitely stand out from the photo. And coupled with a beautiful model, heaven!...

  16. #36
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    Not so much the depth of field although that is the more visible effect, but the longer you go the "better" the perspective. Once you get beyond a certain length the DOF is usually enough.

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