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Thread: Can lowering contrast in your cam increase the DR of the image?

  1. #1

    Default Can lowering contrast in your cam increase the DR of the image?

    As above. I've got a problem shooting high contrast subjects with flash as parts of it are highly reflective.

    Can I just lower the contrast setting of the cam then post process it? Such that the subject is well exposed without being blown out.
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Can lowering contrast in your cam increase the DR of the image?

    wah, need more details like whats the environment settings...very hard to imagine from what you describe.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Can lowering contrast in your cam increase the DR of the image?

    use a polarising filter to cut out the glare.
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  4. #4

    Default Re: Can lowering contrast in your cam increase the DR of the image?

    lowering the contrast setting of the camera can help if we are talking about shooting JPGs...don't think using polarising filter would help much with increasing DR...but you can cut down unwanted reflections depending on the kind of reflections...but don't think it is effective with flash coming I assume from around your camera as the TS asked about...but other conditions as a constant, reducing contrast of camera settings can help abit the DR of your JPGs...but shooting RAW would be better in these situations

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    Default Re: Can lowering contrast in your cam increase the DR of the image?

    Quote Originally Posted by CYRN
    As above. I've got a problem shooting high contrast subjects with flash as parts of it are highly reflective.

    Can I just lower the contrast setting of the cam then post process it? Such that the subject is well exposed without being blown out.
    can show some of this kind of photos? hard to tell what solutions can give to you.

    but a simple solutions is bounce your flash to a area (like ceiling or wall bounce) will not cause lots of reflections.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Can lowering contrast in your cam increase the DR of the image?

    Quote Originally Posted by CYRN
    As above. I've got a problem shooting high contrast subjects with flash as parts of it are highly reflective. Can I just lower the contrast setting of the cam then post process it? Such that the subject is well exposed without being blown out.
    You can do it, but it wont help in the DR part.
    You may try the HDR function if you have photoshop CS

  7. #7

    Default Re: Can lowering contrast in your cam increase the DR of the image?

    Paiseh... still trying to process the photos.

    But here's a sample before PP... basically the cam and ETTL functions as it should... it kept the yellows and greens just below "blown out"

    But if I get a proper exposure for the face... the yellows will be blown by 2/3stops... very distracting.



    Cannot bounce flash... cuz very high ceiling. It's indoor.
    Last edited by CYRN; 15th May 2006 at 06:07 PM.
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  8. #8

    Default Re: Can lowering contrast in your cam increase the DR of the image?

    The short answer is no, DR is a function of the sensitivity of your sensors, which is fixed at the time of manufacture. This is unlike film cameras, where you can change the DR simply by changing films.

    Lowering the contrast will give you a low contrast image. What's blown out will still likely be blown out. Underexposing to retain the highlights doesn't work because you'll lose shadow detail.

    If all you're concerned about is the hot spots, you could do two things:

    a. Mount the camera on a tripod, take two shots at different exposures, use photoshop to merge if possible.

    b. Diffuse the flash which should reduce the size and no of hot spots. You could use a stofen or other diffuser.
    Last edited by waileong; 15th May 2006 at 06:25 PM.

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