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Thread: Will high mAh NiMH batteries harm your electronics?

  1. #1

    Default Will high mAh NiMH batteries harm your electronics?

    Many people are concerned that rechargable NiMH batteries with very high mAh ratings are dangerous to circuits and may short-circuit the electronics. With the current new influx of high capacity rechargable NiMH batteries like the Sanyo 1850, Sanyo 2100, GP 2000 etc, is the above concern unfound?

    Have anyone met any problems with their camera or flashes while using these new batteries, esp the Sanyo 2100 batteries?


  2. #2
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    Default Re: Will high mAh NiMH batteries harm your electronics?

    Originally posted by Bean
    Many people are concerned that rechargable NiMH batteries with very high mAh ratings are dangerous to circuits and may short-circuit the electronics. With the current new influx of high capacity rechargable NiMH batteries like the Sanyo 1850, Sanyo 2100, GP 2000 etc, is the above concern unfound?

    Have anyone met any problems with their camera or flashes while using these new batteries, esp the Sanyo 2100 batteries?

    In a word, NO.

    This is basic electric theory. The rating (say, 2100mAH) only means that it will supply a MAXIMUM current of 2100mAH for 1 hour.

    It does not mean it will pump 2100mAH into your device. If your device draws only 500mAH, it will then draw only 500mAH from the battery (and it will thus last longer).

    Similarly, a 450W power supply will do no more harm than a 250W power supply on your PC. If your m/b + peripherals draw < 250W, then all will be fine.

    Regards
    CK

  3. #3

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    I'd like to clear the misconception that applying high voltage on your equiepment will short circuit them. They will not short circuit, at most, the electrical paths will burn out.

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    Sorry, I have to go off-topic a little. How much and where can I get the new Sanyo 2100 batts?

    Is it really that good? Cos I have 12 X Sanyo 1850 and 4 x Sony 1700 so I dunno whether it is good to get another set of this.

  5. #5

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    Originally posted by lefei
    Sorry, I have to go off-topic a little. How much and where can I get the new Sanyo 2100 batts?
    Mustafa is selling 4 x Sanyo 2100 for SGD $16.00. However, stocks are running out!

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    think it's rubbish, the power is around the same, just the capacity is different.
    "I'm... dreaming... of a wide... angle~
    Just like the ones I used to know~"

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    POWER is the fellow that is generating all the heat in electronics.

    POWER RATING = VOLTAGE RATING * CURRENT RATING

    Watts= Volts * Ampere

    and mAh ratings is not Ampere.

    CURRENT CAPACITY or mAh (AMPERE PER HOUR) refers to how much current the battery is able to supply if it is running continuously at its CURRENT RATING.

    This value does not contribute to the above power equation if time is not a variant.

    Also

    The Current in a circult is limited by the Voltage and Resistance. Since for each AA battery, the voltage is fixed at 1.2V and the Resistance is fixed by the Camera's PCB circult. Therefore

    CURRENT = VOLTAGE(fixed) / RESISTANCE(fixed)

    Since there are no variables, the CURRENT value MUST BE FIXED and will never increase UNLESS the VOLTAGE is changed or a physical short circult have reduced the Circult resistance Drastically

    Hope it helps
    Last edited by jasonpgc; 17th December 2002 at 06:33 PM.

  8. #8

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    Uh hi .. in plain english, can a 6v 10amp Yuasa lead acid battery power a digicam without damage (Fully charged, the batt is 7.2v) if the cam's dc connector is marked for 6v 0.5A. Yes or no?

    TIA


    Originally posted by jasonpgc
    (blah blah blah)
    Since there are no variables, the CURRENT value MUST BE FIXED and will never increase UNLESS the VOLTAGE is changed or a physical short circult have reduced the Circult resistance Drastically

    Hope it helps [/B]

  9. #9

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    The answer to your 6V Yuasa Lead Acid Battery connecting to your 6V camcoder is YES. In general, you don't need to care about the ampere. Rule of the thumb.

    1. Supply(Battery) voltage rating is approx equal to the voltage rating on the device you wish to power. I say approx because rechargable battery voltage rated at 1.2V whereas your alkaline baterry voltage ratred at 1.5V and your device rated requirement at 1.5V. Small differences ok.

    2. Supply(Battery) ampere must be greater than the minimum ampere requirement of the device. Example, your Yuasa lead acid battery rated 10amp vs your cam 0.5A. The 10amp means the battery is capable of supplying a max of 10amp current. The 0.5A rated in your cam means it will consume or draw maximum of 0.5A from the supply. If supply ampere is smaller than the rated amp of the device, the battery will run out very fast and your device might not function properly since it does not receive enough current from the battery.

    So, long story short, don't worry to much about ampere from the battery. Just like your TV with 230V 0.5A rating, it will not blow up just because you connect to a power station which power by Nuclear reactor which can generate alot of MegaWatt. A Chinese Lunar 7th month events with a disel engine power generator is no different from the Nuclear Powered one, differences been Nuclear Powered can power the whole town and disel powered generator can only supply to limited devices only.

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    Originally posted by yllow
    The answer to your 6V Yuasa Lead Acid Battery connecting to your 6V camcoder is YES. In general, you don't need to care about the ampere. Rule of the thumb.

    1. Supply(Battery) voltage rating is approx equal to the voltage rating on the device you wish to power. I say approx because rechargable battery voltage rated at 1.2V whereas your alkaline baterry voltage ratred at 1.5V and your device rated requirement at 1.5V. Small differences ok.

    2. Supply(Battery) ampere must be greater than the minimum ampere requirement of the device. Example, your Yuasa lead acid battery rated 10amp vs your cam 0.5A. The 10amp means the battery is capable of supplying a max of 10amp current. The 0.5A rated in your cam means it will consume or draw maximum of 0.5A from the supply. If supply ampere is smaller than the rated amp of the device, the battery will run out very fast and your device might not function properly since it does not receive enough current from the battery.

    So, long story short, don't worry to much about ampere from the battery. Just like your TV with 230V 0.5A rating, it will not blow up just because you connect to a power station which power by Nuclear reactor which can generate alot of MegaWatt. A Chinese Lunar 7th month events with a disel engine power generator is no different from the Nuclear Powered one, differences been Nuclear Powered can power the whole town and disel powered generator can only supply to limited devices only.
    VERY good analogy here.

    Regards
    CK

  11. #11

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    I would be careful about the 7.2v startup voltage though. It may cause the internal voltage regulators to take more stress than they were designed for. --->Don't connect it to the batt for no reason/too long.

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    Originally posted by dogbot
    Uh hi .. in plain english, can a 6v 10amp Yuasa lead acid battery power a digicam without damage (Fully charged, the batt is 7.2v) if the cam's dc connector is marked for 6v 0.5A. Yes or no?

    TIA
    Sorry about the cheem stuff, I got serious Occupation disease. In short, ensure that the max battery voltage supply to your Digicam matches the Cam's max voltage input written on the Cam's Spec Sheet.

    If the cam spec does not give this value, one way to find out is to measure the terminals (+ and -) of the recommended battery type (Fully charged or new one) with a volt meter, if the fully charged original battery is around 7.2V, Then obviously the 6v 10amp Yuasa lead acid battery will not give you any problem
    Last edited by jasonpgc; 18th December 2002 at 02:01 PM.

  13. #13
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    Originally posted by jasonpgc


    Sorry about the cheem stuff, I got serious Occupation disease. In short, ensure that the max voltage supply to your Digicam matches the Cam's max voltage input written on the Cam's Spec Sheet.

    If the spec does not give the spec for this value, one way to find out is to measure the terminal of original battery type (Fully charged or new one) with a volt meter, if the fully charged original battery is aound 7.2V, Then obviously the 6v 10amp Yuasa lead acid battery will not give you any problem
    I have a hunch it should be fine. 7.2V is probably the battery's voltage in the UNLOADED condition (i.e. nothing connected). When there's a load, it'll probably drop to 6V or thereabouts.

    Regards
    CK

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    Just a reminder. If everything is done right, then the 6V 10 AH lead acid battery should work fine.

    If, touch wood, there is a fault in the connection (since you will most likely be DIY-ing the connecting cables and stuff), such as a short circuit, the 6V 10 AH battery is capable of much more damage than a 7.2V 1800 mAH battery.

    So, be very careful and check for short circuits in the connections before you actually apply the battery to the camera. If your power source is very high capacity as well as high current rating, my advice is to add a safety fuse.
    As complexity rises, precise statements lose meaning and meaningful statements lose precision.

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