Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: How to prepare photos for print?

  1. #1

    Default How to prepare photos for print?

    Hi guys,

    Normally after doing the necessary cropping and fine-tuning, how do you guys save the photos to ensure mininal loss in quality?

    Tks.

  2. #2

    Default

    I saved it as Jpeg, max quality, and burn it to CDs. Not sure if it's correct tho.

  3. #3

    Default

    i just save mine to cd and give it to the labs

  4. #4
    jzr
    Guests

    Default

    Originally posted by togu
    I saved it as Jpeg, max quality, and burn it to CDs. Not sure if it's correct tho.
    i realised that after i crop my pictures and save them at max quality, the picture's filesize becomes even larger. why is this so? is it becos of the saving quality in photoshop?

  5. #5

    Default

    Originally posted by jzr


    i realised that after i crop my pictures and save them at max quality, the picture's filesize becomes even larger. why is this so? is it becos of the saving quality in photoshop?
    Same problem here. This is why I ponder whether I am doing the right thing all this while.

  6. #6

    Default

    I noticed that too, guess it's the compression algorthim used, but didn't really bother about it. In fact, I felt happier since I'm burning it to CD. Sizes does not matter!


  7. #7

    Default

    Normally jpeg are good enough. Jpeg is a file compression format. Infact it will compensate the image quality for compression.

    Thus, it's still not the best format to save your digital work in. The best to use however is TIFF format. The is the highest quality you can save you work on. Quality of image is also dependant on how you resize your image, the scanning source, the settings you use to scan, the file format you choose to use in your digital camera, the resolution of your camera. All these will factor into the results of the digital image.

    If you are sending it for printing, I will suggest you to have 2 versions of format. If permissable by the printer's equipment, the best choice would be to use TIFF format.

  8. #8

    Default

    Yeap i truly agree JPEG is wat it termed as a lossy compression, therefore it will try to figure out what is important to the image and then save it (basically turn the colors to the freq domain and remove the higher frequency component) due to the nature of JPEG the moment u open the picture and then save it the file size will become smaller due to a bit of the image is lost due to compression. If u keep saving the same jpeg picture the quality will deteriorate even though u put at max compression.

    Therefore my advice is to use a lossless format like TIFF to save ur originals and then convert to jpeg. png and targa are also good formats. but beware file size maybe quite big.

  9. #9

    Default

    if printing 4R then all these trouble could be saved
    just a normal jpeg file will do
    even at 200k

  10. #10

    Default

    Should I change the image resolution from 72ppi to 200/300 ppi while cropping down the image to 4R ?

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    12,938

    Default

    don't bother about the number. it doesn't make sense for the lab printers. just send in your highest resolution files and let them handle the printing.
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

  12. #12

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    6,405

    Default

    1. When you crop and save, you are recompressing the file. This ratio might be smaller than the original, which is why if you crop then resave, you might end up with a bigger file.

    2. Don't bother about the PPI. Doesn't matter if it's 1, 300, or 4000. It varies with print size.

    3. Don't bother sending TIFF. Even at 8 x 12", you are not going to see a difference between printing from a TIFF or low compression/high quality JPEG. But if you need to work on the file, save the intermediates in TIFF. Save the final as TIFF. Save a JPEG then send the JPEG to print.

    4. The less you worry, the better. Crop, save, send.
    4a. Better still, go to a good lab, then ask them for either their special "DI" paper, or ask them to do a "FIT" which will print full frame.

    Regards
    CK

  14. #14

    Default

    What is the best software to crop the image to 3:2 ratio ?

  15. #15

    Default

    Originally posted by SkyWalker
    What is the best software to crop the image to 3:2 ratio ?
    any s/w will do

  16. #16

    Default

    What is the cropping ratio for 5R ?

  17. #17

    Default

    Originally posted by SkyWalker
    What is the cropping ratio for 5R ?
    4:3 if i am not wrong

  18. #18

    Talking

    Originally posted by ckiang
    4a. Better still, go to a good lab, then ask them for either their special "DI" paper, or ask them to do a "FIT" which will print full frame.

    Regards
    CK
    but do me still need to crop to 3:2 b4 me azk them to do a "fit" ..... ?? .....

    where can me find a "good" lab ..... ?? .....


  19. #19

    Talking

    everytime after me crop my picz to 3:2 n me go to Image Size ..... me realized that the rezolution will increaze frm 72 to something higher .....

    thiz r my settingz when me crop:

    width: 3 in
    height: 2 in
    rezolution: ( left empty ) pixels/inch


    did me do something wrong .... ?? ....

    y will the rezolution increaze hah ..... ?? ....


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •