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Thread: An experience to share

  1. #21
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    I'll try to keep away from a SLR.... wouldn't want any itch to start

    After shooting some slides with the small and compact Yashica T Zoom, I'm getting a bit hooked on slides though. Was pretty happy with the end results but during the shooting I do find the lack of instant feedback problematic sometimes and also the inflexibility to change ISO when needed (compared to a digicam). From now on, I'm not too sure whether the S602Z would find as much usage as before (it's definitely useful as a "light meter" and when I require long zoom or flash)....

    Just my experience....
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

  2. #22
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    LOL yeah digicams in the pro world are the polaroid backs...
    "I'm... dreaming... of a wide... angle~
    Just like the ones I used to know~"

  3. #23
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    Originally posted by roygoh


    You can practice some good discipline with Zooms also.

    I normally look at a scene with my eyes first, move around until I get the perspective I am visualising, then look through the view finder and zoom to the appropriate magnification/cropping.

    I believe the key is to think before you zoom.

    - Roy
    Which leads me to another question:

    Sometimes, i would try to visualize the shot in my head first (would that be called mental composition?) but after looking at the scene/subject through the view finder, it doesn't look/feel the same.

    Anyone else suffers from the same problem?

    Originally posted by Larry
    i started with a MF long long looooong time ago, and i remember that it really drums into you the fundamentals of photography, like how aperture/shutter speed/focusing/etc etc, work. it's really back to basics of sorts. i always liken it to learning to drive with a manual clutch instead of auto gear. people who are taught to drive with auto cars only (not in Singapore, i mean places like US and AU where there are auto licenses) will not really appreciate how the gear system works.
    Now, this is a pretty good analogy....

    recently for some strange reason though, i've been having thoughts of dumping my Nikon AF system and getting a F3HP with AIS lenses... but then i've always had a thing for classic stuff (like old cars, old toys, old collectibles, that sorta thing). but i think i'm too lazy now to switch back to MF... [/B]
    And since you are thinking of dumping, do dump it in my *ahem* direction.
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  4. #24
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    Originally posted by Wolfgang


    Which leads me to another question:

    Sometimes, i would try to visualize the shot in my head first (would that be called mental composition?) but after looking at the scene/subject through the view finder, it doesn't look/feel the same.

    Anyone else suffers from the same problem?

    That happens frequently for me.

    I would try to make adjustments to get as close to my idea as possible or drop the shot and re-look at the scene.

    - Roy
    As complexity rises, precise statements lose meaning and meaningful statements lose precision.

  5. #25
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    Originally posted by roygoh


    That happens frequently for me.

    I would try to make adjustments to get as close to my idea as possible or drop the shot and re-look at the scene.

    - Roy
    Phew.

    Andi thought i'm the only one with such an issue.
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  6. #26

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    Recently I was fortunate enough to get my hands on a DSLR(megaweb's D60). That was the first time I ever handled a SLR type camera. The thing that I love most is the optical viewfinder. It simply feel great to be able to look through the lens instead looking at an image projected electronically by a digicam.

  7. #27
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    Originally posted by Falcon
    Recently I was fortunate enough to get my hands on a DSLR(megaweb's D60). That was the first time I ever handled a SLR type camera. The thing that I love most is the optical viewfinder. It simply feel great to be able to look through the lens instead looking at an image projected electronically by a digicam.
    Yes, but seriously, when you mean, get your hands on a DSLR, you only handled it for only awhile right? If you think that is already an experience itself, then you ought to use it to go and shoot with it.

    Maybe even a DSLR wouldn't give you the same experience as a SLR since when you use the latter, you are always very aware that the fact that you have a limited amount of film to shoot and there is no 2nd chance to delete and you cannot preview!

    Not that i am saying a DSLR is bad mind you. I am just saying that it is a whole new experience which really forces you to think.
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  8. #28
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    Wolfy, dun get it wrongly. It's perfectly fine to shoot more and more and more and more. One of the reasons those pros become better photographers is that they shoot more and show less, as I read recently. Now I fully agree with it. But u must learn and try to improve as well. Do NOT be fooled that u have to shoot less in order to become a better photographer. NOPE. As long as u make each shot meaningful, shoot till u cannot shoot any more. btw, an SLR or a DSLR does not matter. Your pictures tell everything.

  9. #29

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    Originally posted by tomshen
    Wolfy, dun get it wrongly. It's perfectly fine to shoot more and more and more and more. One of the reasons those pros become better photographers is that they shoot more and show less, as I read recently. Now I fully agree with it. But u must learn and try to improve as well. Do NOT be fooled that u have to shoot less in order to become a better photographer. NOPE. As long as u make each shot meaningful, shoot till u cannot shoot any more. btw, an SLR or a DSLR does not matter. Your pictures tell everything.
    That's why I call Tom 'the tepanyaki master'.

  10. #30
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    Originally posted by MaGixShOe
    catching moving objects using MF is really hard, and u will realise how fast ur AF is and with large lens like 75-300
    its VERY hard to focus and handheld the camera altogether
    We've been through this on Clubsnap several times before.

    Hard but not impossible. To be perfectly honest, I would say 98% of all autofocus photography is convenience, not need.

    I wouldn't say that 75-300s are large lenses, and I'm *not* talking in relation to the lenses used in my line of work. If you hold the lens correctly then really it should be no more difficult than holding any other lens.

  11. #31
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    I do agreed that as the photography experience increases over the years, the person will shoot more and show less and less. When I was preparing for travel exhibitions back in UK, I would select 30 out of hundreds of slides. Over the years, our expectations and standards increases and I became more selective. It takes countless photos to make your name, but a single one to ruin it all.

  12. #32
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    Agree completely with Larry's comments. My sentiments and background exactly. Well aside from his penchant for collecting weird things...

  13. #33
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    Originally posted by funksoulava

    That's why I call Tom 'the tepanyaki master'.
    And why is that so?

    Originally posted by Tomshen
    Wolfy, dun get it wrongly. It's perfectly fine to shoot more and more and more and more. One of the reasons those pros become better photographers is that they shoot more and show less, as I read recently. Now I fully agree with it. But u must learn and try to improve as well. Do NOT be fooled that u have to shoot less in order to become a better photographer. NOPE. As long as u make each shot meaningful, shoot till u cannot shoot any more. btw, an SLR or a DSLR does not matter. Your pictures tell everything.
    Originally posted by MingGuan
    I do agreed that as the photography experience increases over the years, the person will shoot more and show less and less. When I was preparing for travel exhibitions back in UK, I would select 30 out of hundreds of slides. Over the years, our expectations and standards increases and I became more selective. It takes countless photos to make your name, but a single one to ruin it all.
    Tom, i get what you mean.

    It's really good to see everyone sharing and pooling their experience and the journey the have undertaken when it comes to photography in such a constructive manner.

    So please, so long you believe you have something meaningful to contribute, do continue to do so. I am sure newbies to D/SLR cameras or photography can benefit enormously when it comes to everyone pooling and sharing the way the take pictures.

    Sure, philosophies might differ here and there but don't let that be a factor. Instead, celebrate and respect each other's differences in this aspect.
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  14. #34
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    I think the optical SLR beats in terms of "response" times, but in dark conditions not that much diff from EVF unless u're using 1.0 lens, except that the EVF would be blowing out your retina with light in the darkness.
    as usual the best way to knwo about something is to do it wrong the first time
    "I'm... dreaming... of a wide... angle~
    Just like the ones I used to know~"

  15. #35
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    Originally posted by Wolfgang


    That is why i needed Ckiang to explain to me why MF. How owuld that "improve" or enhance my experience in photography and at the same time, develope skills that will make me a better photographer? (Like i previosuly mentioned, i am a utter SLR/MF camera newbie so any explaination would be quite appreciated.)

    And Magixshoe, i think he meant for me to use either a 35mm or 50mm lense... not the large/long zoom lenses.
    Someone said, "The more the camera think for you, the worse your pictures". To a certain extent, it's true. Shooting using a fully manual camera makes you work for the picture, instead of relying on automation.

    Of course, don't purposely go out there and buy a fully manual kit just for that. But I find it fun when you do it once in a while. heh.

    Regards
    CK

  16. #36
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    yeah... it's like going hiking... then go home enjoy the hot water bath and TV
    "I'm... dreaming... of a wide... angle~
    Just like the ones I used to know~"

  17. #37
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    Originally posted by tomshen
    Wolfy, dun get it wrongly. It's perfectly fine to shoot more and more and more and more. One of the reasons those pros become better photographers is that they shoot more and show less, as I read recently. Now I fully agree with it. But u must learn and try to improve as well. Do NOT be fooled that u have to shoot less in order to become a better photographer. NOPE. As long as u make each shot meaningful, shoot till u cannot shoot any more. btw, an SLR or a DSLR does not matter. Your pictures tell everything.
    To a certain extent, shooting more helps you improve. Shooting more in the form of "any old how shoot, LOMO style or without regards for composition, etc" will not.

    I always believe, whether digital or film, that you should make each shot count. Think before you press that shutter. From there, you might want to then explore alternative compositions. Don't blindly shoot 1000 and then pick 1.

    Regards
    CK

  18. #38
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    Originally posted by denizenx
    Larry Enthuses In Camera Alternative?
    i wish....

  19. #39
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    Originally posted by ckiang


    Someone said, "The more the camera think for you, the worse your pictures". To a certain extent, it's true. Shooting using a fully manual camera makes you work for the picture, instead of relying on automation.

    Of course, don't purposely go out there and buy a fully manual kit just for that. But I find it fun when you do it once in a while. heh.

    Regards
    CK
    I see...

    Thanks Ck!
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  20. #40

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    Originally posted by Wolfgang


    I see...

    Thanks Ck!
    So wen you getting that EOS 1v or that F5 you always wanted?
    oh.. not forgetting the 70-200/2.8 L IS USM or the 80-200/2.8 AFS?

    Or issit the 70-200/2.8 VR you looking at?
    hehhehheeee


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