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Thread: B&W Processing + Print

  1. #21
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    Originally posted by Que Lynn
    Wolfgang, if you get addicted to black and white photography... you might wanna consider processing them yourself in the future...

    It's fun!

    However, there are times when I'm like, dammit, can't I just do this on paint shop pro?
    Don't you just find developing scary?

    Your hand slipping in the dark.
    You can almost hear your heart thumping.
    The smelly chemicals.
    The cold air from the air-con brushing against the sweat on your forehead.
    Your unusually cold hands.

    How interesting.

    And yes, Wolfie, I have tried b/w developing before. There's a darkroom in school.
    Last edited by Poledra; 14th December 2002 at 02:39 PM.

  2. #22

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    Originally posted by Poledra


    Don't you just find developing scary?

    Your hand slipping in the dark.
    You can almost hear your heart thumping.
    The smelly chemicals.
    The cold air from the air-con brushing against the sweat on your forehead.
    Your unusually cold hands.

    How interesting.

    And yes, Wolfie, I have tried b/w developing before. There's a darkroom in school.
    Hahaha....tried it long time ago....dun like the feeling of film development.
    Why trouble yourself? Spend a good decent amount of money at a good lab and you will get quality results.
    Oh, maybe it just me.

  3. #23
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    Thanks for all the alternative suggestions regarding b&w printing but right now, for me, it's pretty much a journey of discovery and learning and if possible, i would like to actually go for hands-on approach and see if i can learn and experience something new...

    Someone told me once doing b&w printing is a good form of cartharsis...
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  4. #24

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    Originally posted by scanner


    Hahaha....tried it long time ago....dun like the feeling of film development.
    Why trouble yourself? Spend a good decent amount of money at a good lab and you will get quality results.
    Oh, maybe it just me.
    i think it's really fun ! i am pretty myself in a darkroom. When my pictures come out, when my photos are done... the feeling is totally different from what u get from a colorlab. I think the best printer is still urself, cos u're able to get what u want. I find outside labs...even though they're pretty good, but they don't ultimately give u 100% satisfaction. The thing that intrigues me so much is the moment when e images slowly appear on ur paper or film. Like Ansel Adams said.. the exposure on a film is like a score to a composer, the print is the performance.

  5. #25
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    Originally posted by hazardman


    i think it's really fun ! i am pretty myself in a darkroom. When my pictures come out, when my photos are done... the feeling is totally different from what u get from a colorlab. I think the best printer is still urself, cos u're able to get what u want.
    .... The thing that intrigues me so much is the moment when e images slowly appear on ur paper or film. Like Ansel Adams said.. the exposure on a film is like a score to a composer, the print is the performance.
    Hear hear! I so totally agree with that. So, have you tried processing C-41 film with b/w chemicals? I was thinking of trying that, but I don't wanna think what kinda results it'll churn out...

  6. #26
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    Originally posted by Wolfgang

    .........
    Someone told me once doing b&w printing is a good form of cartharsis...
    Wah.. so chim. Catharsis. You sound like my Lit teacher.

    No, I disagree with that. Being in a darkroom allows you to get a darkroom tan. Bloodshot eyes, stooped posture and paler-than-vampire complexions.

    *giggle* sorry if I sound like a bimbo. I'm listening to Britney Spears.

  7. #27
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    Originally posted by Poledra


    Wah.. so chim. Catharsis. You sound like my Lit teacher.

    No, I disagree with that. Being in a darkroom allows you to get a darkroom tan. Bloodshot eyes, stooped posture and paler-than-vampire complexions.

    I'm close to looking like that already anyway...

    Originally posted by Poledra
    *giggle* sorry if I sound like a bimbo. I'm listening to Britney Spears.
    Thats not a valid excuse!
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  8. #28
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    Originally posted by hazardman


    i think it's really fun ! i am pretty myself in a darkroom. When my pictures come out, when my photos are done... the feeling is totally different from what u get from a colorlab. I think the best printer is still urself, cos u're able to get what u want. I find outside labs...even though they're pretty good, but they don't ultimately give u 100% satisfaction. The thing that intrigues me so much is the moment when e images slowly appear on ur paper or film. Like Ansel Adams said.. the exposure on a film is like a score to a composer, the print is the performance.
    Hazardman, how did you get to use a darkroom? YOu have a room at home set aside for doing the printing or do you do it somewhere else?
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  9. #29

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    Darkroom technique is a a form of art by itself. if you have spend quite sometime in the darkroom, you would realise that you have better control over the quality of your print.
    Even if you send your work out to professional printers, they will not dodge or burn your print, (a step which is crucial in B/W photography). The reason why dodge and burning is crucial because negative has more tonal values as compared to silver-based paper. And without good control and adequate amount of burning and dodging, you will lose quite an amount of details and textures. This would be crucial for fine printing.

    Well you can ask the printers to dodge and burn for a higher price but normally, it would be better if you do it yourself cos only you will know what you want. Furthermore, there are alot of darkroom techniques which commercial printer will not do for you.

  10. #30

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    Originally posted by Poledra


    Wah.. so chim. Catharsis. You sound like my Lit teacher.

    No, I disagree with that. Being in a darkroom allows you to get a darkroom tan. Bloodshot eyes, stooped posture and paler-than-vampire complexions.

    *giggle* sorry if I sound like a bimbo. I'm listening to Britney Spears.
    Well, it's definately cold but i don't get bloodshoot eyes and stoop posture and paler than vam complexion. infact i pretty like controlling print under red light. There's a sense of concentration during the printing and it really requires patience testing and understanding the results of your prints. Your senses gets sharpened as you move around in the dark and when you concentrate in making a master print.

    Infact I spend a great deal of time in the darkroom working till wee hours of the night as a student. There was a few time which I even worked till 3am secretly. Well, that was somekind of experience for me. And if you get what you really want , you will feel that all the hardwork, testing and waiting worthwhile.

    Well, for people whom have acquired a taste for darkroom, they will be fully absorbed in their world and may even love the smell of the chemicals. Maybe that's why in a sense, they could be really like a vampire. weird and simply excentrique. That's me.

  11. #31

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    Originally posted by Poledra
    Hear hear! I so totally agree with that. So, have you tried processing C-41 film with b/w chemicals? I was thinking of trying that, but I don't wanna think what kinda results it'll churn out...
    One of my friends actually did that by accident... she processed a roll of t400CN (a black and white C-41 process film) using b&w chemicals. We first wondered how come her negatives were brownish, as opposed to ours (which was greyish).

    In the end, she is still able to print using the negs (it's "brownscale", after all... ). Not sure how it would turn out for true-color negs though.

    Wolfgang:
    I have no problem with people watching me do my thing... in fact I kind of like having company in the darkroom... I usually process and stuff with some other people (there are five enlargers in the darkroom I use). However, I won't be anywhere near one til next year... I'm off for vacation this wednesday. woo hoo!!! I'm pretty sure I have a LOT to process once I'm back though... I have at *least* 20 rolls of black and white to last me til January 6. Can't wait....

    And yes it's true! B&W printing is an excellent form of cartharsis!!!

  12. #32

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    Originally posted by Que Lynn


    One of my friends actually did that by accident... she processed a roll of t400CN (a black and white C-41 process film) using b&w chemicals. We first wondered how come her negatives were brownish, as opposed to ours (which was greyish).

    In the end, she is still able to print using the negs (it's "brownscale", after all... ). Not sure how it would turn out for true-color negs though.
    I think you will still be able to get some kind of image as colour negs also uses silver halides. but it may not be suitable to use for printing.

  13. #33
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    Originally posted by Que Lynn
    Wolfgang:
    I have no problem with people watching me do my thing... in fact I kind of like having company in the darkroom... I usually process and stuff with some other people (there are five enlargers in the darkroom I use). However, I won't be anywhere near one til next year... I'm off for vacation this wednesday. woo hoo!!! I'm pretty sure I have a LOT to process once I'm back though... I have at *least* 20 rolls of black and white to last me til January 6. Can't wait....

    And yes it's true! B&W printing is an excellent form of cartharsis!!!
    Que Lynn,

    Then i shall look forward to your invitation next year when you come back from yoru holidays?
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  14. #34

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    Originally posted by Wolfgang


    Hazardman, how did you get to use a darkroom? YOu have a room at home set aside for doing the printing or do you do it somewhere else?
    school my friend
    though me n friend had intention to set up one in my hse
    but waiting for approval from parents

  15. #35

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    Originally posted by excentrique


    Well, it's definately cold but i don't get bloodshoot eyes and stoop posture and paler than vam complexion. infact i pretty like controlling print under red light. There's a sense of concentration during the printing and it really requires patience testing and understanding the results of your prints. Your senses gets sharpened as you move around in the dark and when you concentrate in making a master print.

    Infact I spend a great deal of time in the darkroom working till wee hours of the night as a student. There was a few time which I even worked till 3am secretly. Well, that was somekind of experience for me. And if you get what you really want , you will feel that all the hardwork, testing and waiting worthwhile.

    Well, for people whom have acquired a taste for darkroom, they will be fully absorbed in their world and may even love the smell of the chemicals. Maybe that's why in a sense, they could be really like a vampire. weird and simply excentrique. That's me.

    same same....i find e smell of e chemicals....... sometimes refreshing

  16. #36
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    Originally posted by hazardman



    same same....i find e smell of e chemicals....... sometimes refreshing
    And henceforth, i shalt name thee....

    Dark Room Chemical Junkies!

    But seriously, Hazardman, if the chance ever arises, let me know if you don't mind me dropping by
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  17. #37

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    wolf, don't mind at all..
    one of these days i'll sneak u into my sch's darkrm. since it's dark no 1 can see u either
    hahaha

  18. #38
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    Originally posted by hazardman
    wolf, don't mind at all..
    one of these days i'll sneak u into my sch's darkrm. since it's dark no 1 can see u either
    hahaha
    I'll look forward to your PM then.
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  19. #39
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    Originally posted by excentrique
    Even if you send your work out to professional printers, they will not dodge or burn your print, (a step which is crucial in B/W photography). The reason why dodge and burning is crucial because negative has more tonal values as compared to silver-based paper. And without good control and adequate amount of burning and dodging, you will lose quite an amount of details and textures. This would be crucial for fine printing.
    errm what is burning and dodging? what does a burn or a dodge do exactly?

  20. #40

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    is it expensive to setup a dark room?

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