Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 25 of 25

Thread: How to take a photo of a painting.

  1. #21
    Member Andy Ho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Punggol
    Posts
    389

    Default Re: How to take a photo of a painting.

    If using a studio strobe, a reflector head is good enough.

  2. #22

    Default Re: How to take a photo of a painting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Ho
    If using a studio strobe, a reflector head is good enough.
    Any recomendation on studio srobe and place to buy it.hope not too expensive.

  3. #23
    Member Andy Ho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Punggol
    Posts
    389

    Default Re: How to take a photo of a painting.

    Any brand is ok to do the job. Bowens is quite a trusted brand in Singapore photography circle. For small artwork, 500 watt is ok but preferably get the 1500 watt as it would be best to close down the aperture to f/11 or f/16 if you are using a DSLR. Is there a budget that you are looking at?

    The 1500 watts should be around S$2200 each or so from Ruby.

    Or you could get the Bowens Gemini series. The Gemini comes in a carry case with 2pcs 500 watts light in there, a small soft box, an umbrella, 2 light stands, all for around S$2500.

    You may need purchase an additional reflector head for the light at around $80 or so.

  4. #24

    Default Re: How to take a photo of a painting.

    Thx Andy , these are great info for me to keep in mind.
    The price is high for a amateur like me..but think it is ok for a pro with studio.

  5. #25

    Default Re: How to take a photo of a painting.

    HossaWhat do you by way of equipment to work with ? With a list of what resources you have to work with, a way can be found to do this. Have done this without the use of studio flashes.The twin light source (can be flashes can continous light sources) is the standard almost "default" way to light but it has certain draw backs :-1. a hotter center area where there is overlap of light from the sides.2. shadows cast by side lighting for oil paintings.3. if you are really bad at adjustment - 2 hot spots on the capture of the artwork. When you have high gloss media be prepared to get shocked by hot spots.Oil painitings require a different lighting pattern than this. Otherwise it does not reproduce the oil painting as viewed from human eyes.Get your colors and tone right on caputure - PS will kill you - since most of PS adjustments are global unless you want to break you back done area by area or color by color adjustment.As a word of encouragement - its doable even with 1 or 2 or 3 hot shoe flashs or even large window light. What it takes is a clear understanding of light, what it looks like, how to make it do what you need, and the nature of the artwork medium. Did it on film , digital should be an easier learning curve.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •