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Thread: People photography - tips and sharing

  1. #61

    Default Re: People photography - tips and sharing

    If i spot a good subject, I raise my camera, smile and give a notion that I'm going to take a pic, if the subject is willing, he/she will pose for you, and sometimes I ask. I've been ticked off and chase off areas I'm not suppose to take pics without permission before, and the feeling isn't good... but I lived to take more pics

  2. #62
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    Default Re: People photography - tips and sharing

    Quote Originally Posted by IvT
    If i spot a good subject, I raise my camera, smile and give a notion that I'm going to take a pic, if the subject is willing, he/she will pose for you, and sometimes I ask. I've been ticked off and chase off areas I'm not suppose to take pics without permission before, and the feeling isn't good... but I lived to take more pics
    But it also depends whether the person is really right or wrong. Say for example u're standing outside a shop on a street and taking pics of the shop. The owner will have no right to chase u away whatsoever cos u're in a public place and not inside his/her shop.
    Canon EOS 5D, 24-70 f/4 L IS, 50 f/1.2 L, 70-300 f/4-5.6 L IS, 600EX-RT. Sigma 12-24 f/4.5-5.6 EX.

  3. #63
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    Default Re: People photography - tips and sharing

    Quote Originally Posted by AngelZhou
    simple, Time For and quickly running away! Becareful kena if you are not fast enough
    If you behave like you're commiting a crime by taking a photo, this will only reinforce the suspicions of the general public and make it harder in the future.

  4. #64

    Default Re: People photography - tips and sharing

    Thats wat i think too..... but it will be too grainy right? it gives me the impression that a grainy picture is not very sharp..... i think there is no possible way of capturing such a sharp image at low light without the person knowing and still fine grain..... hmmmm limitations of technology..... maybe we need more researchers....

    Quote Originally Posted by Zack
    It's still possible with a 50mm F1.4 at ISO 1600.

  5. #65

    Default Re: People photography - tips and sharing

    Well, it's definitely grainy. Sometimes given the situation (like low light and no tripod), it's better to have a grainy shot than no shot right?

  6. #66
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    Default Re: People photography - tips and sharing

    Thanks for all the discussions in here after started this post.

    Apologies for not posting this in the right section earlier (thanks to the mod who moved it into the right section).

    I shoot with a 40-150 (80-300mm on the Oly E-300) and I can get quite close to some subjects and sometimes steal a shot when they are posing for others, while at the same time, I hardly want to engage in small talk with the subject (even if they are cute chicks) because I wanted the moment, but not to know them.

    I have been lucky so far without getting ugly confrontation, except for an old man who approached me once in Taiwan after I shot him who asked to see his picture. I was honest with him and he was graceful about it.

    I like old folks and stray animals, and the latter usually don't complain... when they do, they leave bite marks... LOL. Old folks are hard to shoot, because they cautious (sometimes paranoid) and grumpy, but they are the best subjects... time and life is carved onto their faces... most young people lacks the character to make an interesting subject... (I know there are those who begs to differ) but this is what I feel.

    I hardly shoot girls, because there is really nothing there to capture except their youth. To do a better job at that, I will rather put them in a controlled shooting environment and really bring out the best in them, but most normal girls can't pose to save their life, and the images all turn out pretty normal... and I am not trained to be a fashion/portrait photographer, so my skills are not good enough anyway... the only candids for the youth are either when they are having fun in their natural elements, or when there is a burst of emotions.

    I hardly want to shoot Singaporean candids, because the SG people reacts so "drama".

    Taiwanese and Japanese are the best people to shoot, they consider it flattery to be shot on the street. Unless I am sure that the shot is very good, I will hardly offer to give a print to the subject. But the most important thing that I always reminded myself is that I have to respect the subject. I'd rather take my fingers off the shutter release button than to lose my respect for the subject. There is always another chance.

    The hardest part in street candid is always getting the right natural pose! And you cannot keep the lens pointed in the same direction for too long or the subject will notice you and then move away... its always bringing the camera up at the right moment and then putting it away... That leaves the other potential subjects at ease too... when they start noticing a photographer is in the midst of them, they will usually move away or clam up, nothing to shoot anymore...

  7. #67
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    Default Re: People photography - tips and sharing

    Quote Originally Posted by Zack
    Well, it's definitely grainy. Sometimes given the situation (like low light and no tripod), it's better to have a grainy shot than no shot right?
    Technically perfect shot versus a good feel, I would choose the latter. I agree with you, Zack.

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