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Thread: How do they print our photo?

  1. #1
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    Default How do they print our photo?

    Hi All,

    Anyone can share with me? just checked out from a lab's assitant, It seems there are using RGB to cast photo?? can it be???I doubt him..

    Or may be their developing machines are so smart enough to change it without much losses?

    Let say there are using CMYK to print, It's better for me to change to CMYK, so that there don't adjust my colour..

    Any experienced lab person here to clarify?

  2. #2

    Default Re: How their print our photo?

    sRGB for lab (Fuji Frontier, etc)

    Adobe RGB for your inkjet printer

    CMYK - for press (offset) or if you have a rip or postscript for your inkjet

  3. #3
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    Default Re: How their print our photo?

    Using sRGB to cast Photo print? As my understanding... RGB is making up by HUE CHROMA and LIGHTNESS... more likely to be monitor's display... I doubt using R G B ink can produce a good image at photopaper.. oops ya... the photopaper are using chemical huh..

    How their expose the image onto the photopaper? anyone can enlighten me?

  4. #4

    Default Re: How their print our photo?

    Quote Originally Posted by jopel
    sRGB for lab (Fuji Frontier, etc)

    Adobe RGB for your inkjet printer

    CMYK - for press (offset) or if you have a rip or postscript for your inkjet
    He is not talking about monitor display profile...

  5. #5

    Default Re: How their print our photo?

    hmmmm...then try ProPhotoRGB - this working space has the widest range of colours.
    the problem is at the moment there is no 16bits printer to handle it.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: How their print our photo?

    Sorry... I think I haven't putting it clear..

    Before they print the photo, how there expose the photopaper?

    R there using RGB to expose the Photopaper 1st then print(chemical develop) with CMYK?

    Excuse me.. a bit confuse here..

    Quote Originally Posted by jopel
    hmmmm...then try ProPhotoRGB - this working space has the widest range of colours.
    the problem is at the moment there is no 16bits printer to handle it.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: How their print our photo?

    I thought there must be some light source to expose the photopaper.. the chemical just to serve as a fixer(stopper) may be?

    ??? Pardon me, just so eager to know..

  8. #8

    Default Re: How their print our photo?

    I belief that Fuji Frontier machines are programmed for RGB input, and from this interesting site,

    http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...obeRGB1998.htm

    we can see that sRGB should be good enough for the Frontier machines...

    no point using ProPhotoRGB if even Adobe RGB is too wide...

  9. #9
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    Default Re: How their print our photo?

    Quote Originally Posted by erizai
    Before they print the photo, how there expose the photopaper?
    Modern printing machines do it by using coloured laser beams, typically RGB. Note however that the colour gamut of the light sources does not really matter: it has to be matched to the sensitivity of the photographic paper, not that of the human eye. In principle, some company could come out with a paper where the three different colour layers respond to different wavelengths in the blue range of the spectrum, and the matching printing machine would have to use three different shadesof blue to expose the paper. What matters is the gamut of the developed photographic paper, and how selectively the printing machine can address it.

    then print(chemical develop) with CMYK?
    CMY only, otherwise you're right.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: How their print our photo?

    Thanks for answering. Just found out from one lab guy, it's indeed using CMY to develop on photopaper. and it is really using RGB beam to expose. So I guess in that case.. I need not change to CMYK before sending to the lab.

    As your quote.. how accurate the colour reproduce on the photopaper depends on the exposing machine + the reactivity (paper gamut) of the photopaper itself.

    In another word, the photopaper quality is the major factor that affect the print.

    I think i really need to avoid some shop which using sub standard photopaper.

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf
    Modern printing machines do it by using coloured laser beams, typically RGB. Note however that the colour gamut of the light sources does not really matter: it has to be matched to the sensitivity of the photographic paper, not that of the human eye. In principle, some company could come out with a paper where the three different colour layers respond to different wavelengths in the blue range of the spectrum, and the matching printing machine would have to use three different shadesof blue to expose the paper. What matters is the gamut of the developed photographic paper, and how selectively the printing machine can address it.



    CMY only, otherwise you're right.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: How their print our photo?

    Quote Originally Posted by erizai
    In another word, the photopaper quality is the major factor that affect the print.
    Keep in mind that this statement is only valid if all the processing steps are done properly. If a lab cuts corners and doesn clean or calibrate the machine, or uses old chemicals, poor results may not be the fault of the paper.

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