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Thread: any suggestion to stop lens shake?

  1. #1
    Member Kinciad's Avatar
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    Default any suggestion to stop lens shake?

    been playing around with my 75-300 lens. mounted on some tripod and noticed that the whole setup (lens and cam) shakes (very slightly) when the shutter opens n closes.

    1) at 300mm, will the slight 'vibration' caused by the shutter blur pictures?

    2) i dont have a remote release yet, so i used timer instead... any use?

    3) will more expensive tripods prevent this? "note the vibration is caused by shutter movement and not by shaky tripod - i think!"

    any comments or suggestions are greatly appreciated.

    thanks
    Last edited by Kinciad; 20th November 2002 at 09:09 PM.

  2. #2
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    Yes, you need a better tripod. The better ones are more stable and is able to keep the camera steady. The tripod head itself is also important if you want ultimate stability. The cheaper ones are not very steady, and still let the camera vibrate a little. A timer will not really reduce camera-induced vibration, as is the cable release, if the tripod setup is not stable enough.

    Regards
    CK

  3. #3
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    besides mo-money solutions, see if everything is tightened fully...
    if using cheap tripod try to spread the legs a bit extra when the load is mounted... try to stabilize the lens from shake before u let go... do not shoot in strong wind...

    get IS lens
    "I'm... dreaming... of a wide... angle~
    Just like the ones I used to know~"

  4. #4

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    I remember reading about this famous nature photographer who likes to carry around a light tripod rather than a heavy one. She brings along a sandbag as well, fills it with sand and hangs it from the tripod to stabilize it.

    Maybe you can just hang your loaded camera bag from the tripod to stabilize it...

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    Member Kinciad's Avatar
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    hmm guess i could be more specific.

    assuming the tripod is stable. would the slight movement caused by the moving shutter cause pictures to blur/ not as sharp. ( at 300mm ... slight movements magnified... am i right? )

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    Moderator ziploc's Avatar
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    I presume you're talking about SLR? The vibration normally comes from the mirror slaps and not the shutter movements, and the pic is more prone to blurness from it at a slow shutter speed range (1/15 to 2s? Can't remember, please correct me if I'm wrong). The way to avoid this problem is to use a mirror lockup, assuming you're already using a sturdy tripod and timer/shutter release.

    Hope that helps.

  7. #7
    Member Kinciad's Avatar
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    Originally posted by ziploc
    I presume you're talking about SLR? The vibration normally comes from the mirror slaps and not the shutter movements, and the pic is more prone to blurness from it at a slow shutter speed range (1/15 to 2s? Can't remember, please correct me if I'm wrong). The way to avoid this problem is to use a mirror lockup, assuming you're already using a sturdy tripod and timer/shutter release.

    Hope that helps.
    hmm...looks like i really have alot to learn from you guys..
    so the vibrations are caused by mirror slaps...but what are those? if its too difficult to explain, then forget abt it k?
    anione with links to a site that explains would do fine too..
    mirror lockup too.. dont think my camera has those? ( have not seen it in the menu~ )

    btw thanks to all who replied...it helped

  8. #8
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    Default Re: any suggestion to stop lens shake?

    Originally posted by Kinciad
    been playing around with my 75-300 lens. mounted on some tripod and noticed that the whole setup (lens and cam) shakes (very slightly) when the shutter opens n closes.

    1) at 300mm, will the slight 'vibration' caused by the shutter blur pictures?
    There's a couple of causes for blurring of images when mounted on a tripod and these are:

    1) Tripod too lightly constructed (ie: flimsy)

    2) Ballhead/Panhead not locking down correctly

    3) Poor tripod collar design that doesn't hold the lens/camera rigidly.

    4) Poor trigger release method (the finger should be rolled gently over the shutter release, not stabbed, poked or otherwise violently pressee.

    5) Mirror slap. Not much you can do about this one as it's an inherant design flaw in many cameras (caused by having light camera chassis, insufficient damping and cost cutting in general).

    Mirror slap occurs when the reflex mirror movement is activated. If the mirror isn't well damped then the voilence of the movement sets up a vibration in the camera body that can last upwards of 1/4 second in severe cases.

    Originally posted by Kinciad
    2) i dont have a remote release yet, so i used timer instead... any use?
    It depends on how your camera implements the self timer function. If the reflex mirror is moved 'up' at the start of the self timer cycle then it will help a lot in reducing vibration. If however the mirror is moved just before the shutter is actuated then it's of little use. You can test this function by simply watching through the viewfinder and seeing if when in the self timer cycle the image through the viewfinder goes blank (black).
    Originally posted by Kinciad

    3) will more expensive tripods prevent this? "note the vibration is caused by shutter movement and not by shaky tripod - i think!"
    Generally you get what you pay for with tripods. Light tripods (with the exception of carbon fibre and composite fibre tripods) tend to be extremely prone to vibration with long lenses.

    A few tips however.

    The use of a 'rock bag' or sling is an old trick that Streetshooter has mentioned. It involved using a sling between the tripod legs and filling it with a couple of kilos of rocks, gravel, sand etc. However you have to be careful that you don't overload the tripod. this method is greatly favoured by European wildlife photographers and those working with prime lenses over 600mm

    Get a heavy tripod - For pure stability nothing beats mass and good old weight. Heavy tripods are far more stable than light tripods. The downside is that they can be back breaking to carry. (Try lugging a 8+kg tripod/head combination around and you'll know what I mean).

    Try placing your hand over the tripod collar. Again this is a standard long lens technique and damps vibration very well for shots over 1/60th of a second.

    Avoid the infamous 1/30th to 1/8th or thereabouts 'blur zone'. A lot of zoom lenses have insubstantial tripod collars and are prone to image blur between about 1/30th and 1/8th second shutter speeds. Avoid this speed range where possible.

    Lock all controls on the tripod down tight!

    Hope this helps.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  9. #9

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    to get a 8kg tripod for a 70-300 mm lens is a bit overkilled,i think.

    try this site anyway: http://www.gitzo.com/guide/rightscreen.php3

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