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Thread: Sunny F16 rule for digital cam

  1. #1

    Default Sunny F16 rule for digital cam

    Hi, is there any digital camera equivalent of sunny F16 rule? My digi cam only up to F8

    Or is there is any conversion factor?

  2. #2
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    hi what's the f16 rule? the one they print on the film boxes?
    but digicam can change ISO right...
    "I'm... dreaming... of a wide... angle~
    Just like the ones I used to know~"

  3. #3

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    Originally posted by denizenx
    hi what's the f16 rule? the one they print on the film boxes?
    but digicam can change ISO right...
    The sunny F16 is the accurate way to ensure the correct exposure under the clear sunny day.

    It means that under this clear sunny day outdoor, if you set your F-stop to 16 and shutter speed to 1/(ISO number). You will get the correct exposure.

    My concern is whether this work with digi cam bcos the appeture, the len design is different from 35mm format. I am not sure if F8 in digi cam is equivalent to F8 for 35mm.

    Most digicam dun have F16.

    Any expert???

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Sunny F16 rule for digital cam

    Originally posted by jimtong
    Hi, is there any digital camera equivalent of sunny F16 rule? My digi cam only up to F8
    Or is there is any conversion factor?
    Just use the usual reciprocity rules for adjusting your exposure settings accordingly. If you're using ISO x, the sunny f/16 rule says that you should shoot at an aperture setting of f/16 and shutter speed of 1/x to obtain correct exposure.

    For ISO 100, this means you should shoot at f/16 and 1/100s. Using reciprocity, this is the same as f/11 and 1/200s, or f/8 and 1/400s, or f/5.6 and 1/800s. And so on and so forth.

    (Btw, I find that it's usually better to trust your camera's meter than to rely on the sunny f/16 rule, but your mileage may vary.)

  5. #5

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    Hi!

    More interestingly, I would like to ask why use the Sunny 16 Rule when you have a reliable light meter in your digital camera.

    The Sunny 16 Rule can be applied when "sway sway" your light meter goes wrong.

  6. #6

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    Originally posted by mervlam
    Hi!

    More interestingly, I would like to ask why use the Sunny 16 Rule when you have a reliable light meter in your digital camera.

    The Sunny 16 Rule can be applied when "sway sway" your light meter goes wrong.
    Jux for curiosity

  7. #7

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    Personally, I feel that it's a hit-or-miss kind of concept. But you woudln't be far off from the proper exposure.

  8. #8

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    Originally posted by jimtong

    I am not sure if F8 in digi cam is equivalent to F8 for 35mm.
    AFAIK, Aperture is just a ratio/fraction. F8 should be the same in digi cam, 35mm, 350mm, 35000mm etc....

  9. #9
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    Hi

    the sunny 16 rule is not a hit or miss concept. in sunny conditions, hand held incident light meters do agree with the Sunny 16 rule. in fact, the various guidelines for shooting under overcast, shade conditions etc are all very valid.

    it's the creative application of the rule that gets you results. For example, if u're shooting a backlit subject, u have to modify the readings given by the Sunny 16 rule or incident light reading if u're not taking the incident reading off the subject.

    of course this assumes u're willing to take time to amass the experience to judge exposure by eye in combination with any of the above tools (handheld meter, in camera meter etc)

    and pardon me for bursting any bubbles, the light meters in digital cameras are not reliable. In fact, the light meter in ANY camera is not 100% reliable. Show me wat u think is a reliable in-camera meter and I will show you a scene where it will be fooled.
    David Teo
    View my work and blog at http://www.5stonesphoto.com/blog

  10. #10

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    Originally posted by Red Dawn
    Hi

    the sunny 16 rule is not a hit or miss concept. in sunny conditions, hand held incident light meters do agree with the Sunny 16 rule. in fact, the various guidelines for shooting under overcast, shade conditions etc are all very valid.

    it's the creative application of the rule that gets you results. For example, if u're shooting a backlit subject, u have to modify the readings given by the Sunny 16 rule or incident light reading if u're not taking the incident reading off the subject.

    of course this assumes u're willing to take time to amass the experience to judge exposure by eye in combination with any of the above tools (handheld meter, in camera meter etc)

    and pardon me for bursting any bubbles, the light meters in digital cameras are not reliable. In fact, the light meter in ANY camera is not 100% reliable. Show me wat u think is a reliable in-camera meter and I will show you a scene where it will be fooled.
    That's why I said hit-or-miss. In most situations, u hit and other times where it's tricky, u miss.

    Reliable light meter? Let's just say that it's relatively reliable.

  11. #11

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    Before the time of built-in light meters, photographers set their exposure base on a incident-light meter or experience derived from the Sunny 16 guideline.

    Innovation of built-in light meters make photography much simplier. However, light meter is still a reflected-light meter, which gives an exposure reading on the brightness of the scene assuming it's 18% grey.

    Built-in light meters are reliable most of the time as a scene is usually 18% grey, however, they get fooled once the scene gets tricky. This is when the photographer comes in and set his own exposure, with the help of the Sunny 16 rule, especially when outdoors.

    The only advantage I can think of for built-in light meters is they are TTL, which an external light-meter will not be able to compensate for the loss of lights throught the lens etc...

  12. #12
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    Originally posted by Red Dawn
    and pardon me for bursting any bubbles, the light meters in digital cameras are not reliable. In fact, the light meter in ANY camera is not 100% reliable. Show me wat u think is a reliable in-camera meter and I will show you a scene where it will be fooled.
    Yes, camera light meters are definitely by no means foolproof. Having said that, though, I do believe that their readings at least make a much better starting point for the photographer's subsequent manual corrections than just broad guidelines like the sunny f/16 rule. Unless one has to rush a photo shoot, I find that careful spot metering of various scene elements will usually give me a good idea of the "best" exposure settings I need to achieve what I want.

  13. #13

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    Remember that film is much more tolorant of exposure errors than digital sensors.

    Just something to keep in mimd.

  14. #14

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    Originally posted by Zoomer
    Remember that film is much more tolorant of exposure errors than digital sensors.

    Just something to keep in mimd.
    oh really?? have you ever tried slides?

  15. #15

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    Originally posted by nothing


    oh really?? have you ever tried slides?
    I am going to. I meant negative film.

  16. #16

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    Interesting debate here. Thanks for the input. I will experiment with F16 Sunny rule with my digicam if the weather is "perfect"

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