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Thread: Taking Wedding photos

  1. #1

    Default Taking Wedding photos

    Will be taking 2 wedding photos in the coming months...just curious:

    Is Fuji Press 800 good for outdoors too...anticipate that there will be both (indoors and outdoors)

    Do I have to step up the ISO?

    Please advise....

  2. #2

    Default

    UPZ....

  3. #3
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    Default

    if you're using flash, you may not need the fast film.
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

  4. #4

    Default

    Originally posted by mpenza
    if you're using flash, you may not need the fast film.
    Will be using flash...but was thinking of the lighting condition in the ballroom during the dinner might not be good....

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Taking Wedding photos

    Originally posted by Paladin
    Will be taking 2 wedding photos in the coming months...just curious:

    Is Fuji Press 800 good for outdoors too...anticipate that there will be both (indoors and outdoors)

    Do I have to step up the ISO?

    Please advise....
    If you have a lens that can do f/4 constant, and is sharp from f/4 onwards, Press 800 does very well indoors in the typical ballroom/chinese restaurant type of conditions. Even if ambient lighting is enough, use flash and fill in.

    Outdoors, Press 800 might be a little too "fast". Try NPH 400 outdoors instead. Or even NPC/NPS160.

    Regards
    CK

  6. #6

    Default Re: Re: Taking Wedding photos

    Originally posted by ckiang


    If you have a lens that can do f/4 constant, and is sharp from f/4 onwards, Press 800 does very well indoors in the typical ballroom/chinese restaurant type of conditions. Even if ambient lighting is enough, use flash and fill in.

    Outdoors, Press 800 might be a little too "fast". Try NPH 400 outdoors instead. Or even NPC/NPS160.

    Regards
    CK
    CK, why f/4? If 800 for outdoor wedding shoots, isn't it OK since I most probably not gonna use slow shutter?

    Realised that most people use the NPH400 at 320.....you reckon?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Re: Re: Taking Wedding photos

    Originally posted by Paladin


    CK, why f/4? If 800 for outdoor wedding shoots, isn't it OK since I most probably not gonna use slow shutter?

    Realised that most people use the NPH400 at 320.....you reckon?
    I used to use NPH400 @ 320. Excellent film, great skintones, but Press 800 gives me a much better balance between ambient and flash exposure, giving a much more natural result.

    Most lenses are not sharp wide open, but improves dramatically from f/4 onwards, hence the f/4 recommendation. For those f/3.5-4.5 lenses, might want to use f/5.6. Of coz, if you have a f/1.4 lens you can try f/2.

    Regards
    CK

  8. #8

    Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Taking Wedding photos

    Originally posted by ckiang


    I used to use NPH400 @ 320. Excellent film, great skintones, but Press 800 gives me a much better balance between ambient and flash exposure, giving a much more natural result.

    Most lenses are not sharp wide open, but improves dramatically from f/4 onwards, hence the f/4 recommendation. For those f/3.5-4.5 lenses, might want to use f/5.6. Of coz, if you have a f/1.4 lens you can try f/2.

    Regards
    CK
    Last Qn: Do you recommend I use press 800 at the exact ISO?

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Taking Wedding photos

    Originally posted by Paladin


    Last Qn: Do you recommend I use press 800 at the exact ISO?
    Rate it at 640 or 500. I always under-rate my negative films. Most are not at the exact ISO anyway, and negatives benefit from slight over exposure.

    Regards
    CK

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Taking Wedding photos

    Originally posted by ckiang


    Rate it at 640 or 500. I always under-rate my negative films. Most are not at the exact ISO anyway, and negatives benefit from slight over exposure.

    Regards
    CK
    Just read this... Instead of under rating the DX. Will using +ev helps? like 1/2 stop?

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Taking Wedding photos

    Originally posted by binbeto


    Just read this... Instead of under rating the DX. Will using +ev helps? like 1/2 stop?
    Yup, that gives the same effect.

    Regards
    CK

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    Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Taking Wedding photos

    Originally posted by ckiang


    Yup, that gives the same effect.

    Regards
    CK
    Thanks.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Taking Wedding photos

    Originally posted by ckiang


    Yup, that gives the same effect.

    Regards
    CK
    Just curious...if it is the same, isn't pushing half a stop on the EV better than the iso...do not need to pay the extra processing fee for the latter...right?

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Taking Wedding photos

    Originally posted by Paladin


    Just curious...if it is the same, isn't pushing half a stop on the EV better than the iso...do not need to pay the extra processing fee for the latter...right?
    Huh? I think you got confused between "rerating" the film and "pushing" the film.

    Re-rating refers to setting a different ISO than indicated on the film packing, and processing "as normal". This is to get a film speed closer to the film's "real" speed, or to intentionally over/underexpose the film.

    Pushing refers to setting a higher ISO than rated, then telling the lab to adjust processing times to compensate for this underexposure.

    So, on a ISO 400 film, if you want to re-rate to ISO 320, you can either -1/3 EV, or set ISO dial to 320. If you want to push to 800, you can either set ISO 800 on the ISO dial, or set -1 EV. But make sure if you push, tell the lab; if you re-rate, DON'T tell the lab.

    Regards
    CK

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