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Thread: Aperture and Shutter

  1. #1

    Cool Aperture and Shutter

    I was under the assumption that shutter speed can over expose or under expose a photograph. But different apertures with the right shutter speed can also result in over or under exposing a photograph? Please enlighten thanks!

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    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    Yep... you got both the ideas right.

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    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    ISO speed can also affect the exposure of the photo.

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    Senior Member redstone's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    I myself still yet to master the settings...

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    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by itsybitsyspidy
    I was under the assumption that shutter speed can over expose or under expose a photograph. But different apertures with the right shutter speed can also result in over or under exposing a photograph? Please enlighten thanks!
    As I understand it, exposure is affected by a combination of iSO, Aperture & shutter speed setting.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    so EV step is just blowing up the aperture and shutter speed together?

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    Senior Member redstone's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    Still got Exposure Compensation...

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    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    The relationship between shutter speed and aperature can be imagine as a calculation on the amount of volume, in photography sense, it is the amount of light.

    If your aperature is big (f1.8) and your shutter speed is slow (8"), you get a large volume which in turns a large amount of light which might lead to overexposure. On the other hand, if your aperature is small (f22) and your shutter speed is fast (1/8000), you get a very small volume which means a small amount of light which might lead to underexposure.

    For ISO, the higher the ISO, the more reactivity it is to light, but at the expense of noise. So if you combine the 3 factors together, it is very much the fundamental of photography.
    Last edited by Francis247; 9th January 2006 at 11:50 PM.
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  9. #9

    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by Francis247
    The relationship between shutter speed and aperature can be imagine as a calculation on the amount of volume, in photography sense, it is the amount of light.

    If your aperature is big (f1.8) and your shutter speed is slow (8"), you get a large volume which in turns a large amount of light which might lead to overexposure. On the other hand, if your aperature is small (f22) and your shutter speed is fast (1/8000), you get a very small volume which means a small amount of light which might lead to underexposure.

    For ISO, the higher the ISO, the more reactivity it is to light, but at the expense of noise. So if you combine the 3 factors together, it is very much the fundamental of photography.
    wow bro, thanks alot for clearing the stuff. helps alot.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by redstone
    Still got Exposure Compensation...
    er it's that +0.5 +1 +2 thingy right? how does that work?

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by itsybitsyspidy
    wow bro, thanks alot for clearing the stuff. helps alot.
    Hi,

    You are welcome. I believe others got a better way of clarifying than my engineering method of explaining.

    Hope that others can share their views on this too.
    莫问前程有愧,只求今生无悔. Time pasts, Places changed, Beauty faded, what is left are Photos of Memories…

  12. #12

    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    Aperture besides controlling the amount of light,
    it controls the DOF (Depth of Field).

  13. #13

    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    actually i prefer the technical/engineering stuff, helps me understand it better.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by obewan
    Aperture besides controlling the amount of light,
    it controls the DOF (Depth of Field).
    am i right to say because you focus on an object, then if the background is further away, lesser light gets reflected off the background, thus when reaching your lens it makes the background go out of focus and everything?

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    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by obewan
    Aperture besides controlling the amount of light,
    it controls the DOF (Depth of Field).
    Oh yes, thanks obewan. Almost forgot about this.
    The bigger the aperature (f1.8), the shallower the DOF. The smaller the aperature (f22), the greater depth of field.

    I did some shots using my 50 f1.8 to show the different DOF at different aperature settings. Thought of using it to explain DOF and aperature relationship.
    莫问前程有愧,只求今生无悔. Time pasts, Places changed, Beauty faded, what is left are Photos of Memories…

  16. #16

    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    heh. yeah i only know the F-number smaller can get better bokeh, shutter speed slower can get nice night shots, shutter speed fast together with exposure compensation can be used if your hands are shaky, machiam can act like "VR". just that i dunno the physics behind it. But i see f/22 can also give great bokeh leh. dun understand.

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    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by Francis247
    The relationship between shutter speed and aperature can be imagine as a calculation on the amount of volume, in photography sense, it is the amount of light.

    If your aperature is big (f1.8) and your shutter speed is slow (8"), you get a large volume which in turns a large amount of light which might lead to overexposure. On the other hand, if your aperature is small (f22) and your shutter speed is fast (1/8000), you get a very small volume which means a small amount of light which might lead to underexposure.

    For ISO, the higher the ISO, the more reactivity it is to light, but at the expense of noise. So if you combine the 3 factors together, it is very much the fundamental of photography.
    weee! very good explaination. so am i right to say that if i need a high shuttle speed to take a photo, my aperture gotta be wider? please teach me some stuff man. it's real hard to get the settings right for a good shot =(
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    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by itsybitsyspidy
    am i right to say because you focus on an object, then if the background is further away, lesser light gets reflected off the background, thus when reaching your lens it makes the background go out of focus and everything?
    Hi,

    How about this method of explaining: The bigger the aperature (f1.8), the less focus will be the surrounding hence causing the background to blur. On the other hand, the smaller the aperature (f22), the image capture by the lens are more focus hence the background is more clear and sharp.

    You can imagine, if you want to see something far away, you tends to focus and strain your eyes (smaller aperature). However, if your relax your eyes (bigger aperature), something far away may not appear as clear.
    莫问前程有愧,只求今生无悔. Time pasts, Places changed, Beauty faded, what is left are Photos of Memories…

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by Koelsch
    weee! very good explaination. so am i right to say that if i need a high shuttle speed to take a photo, my aperture gotta be wider? please teach me some stuff man. it's real hard to get the settings right for a good shot =(
    Hi,

    The main thing behind ISO, Shutter Speed and Aperature is amount of lighting available. Most (if not all) digital cameras are equipped with the metering system to determine the amount of light available, so it tends to use what is the read out on the metering to determine the ISO, aperature and shutter speed.

    However, if you are using manual setting, on a bright sunny day, you have plenty of light, you may want to avoid overexposure. So, you may want to use a lower ISO so that it is less reactivity to the amount of light falling onto the CCD (too technical here, still can't really explain well). On top of that, you may wish to use fast shutter speed to avoid hand shake problem, so your aperature selected should be in the range of big aperature (f1.8) or middle range (f5.6 - f11) depending on the shutter speed and how much light is available.
    莫问前程有愧,只求今生无悔. Time pasts, Places changed, Beauty faded, what is left are Photos of Memories…

  20. #20

    Default Re: Aperture and Shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by Francis247
    Hi,

    How about this method of explaining: The bigger the aperature (f1.8), the less focus will be the surrounding hence causing the background to blur. On the other hand, the smaller the aperature (f22), the image capture by the lens are more focus hence the background is more clear and sharp.

    You can imagine, if you want to see something far away, you tends to focus and strain your eyes (smaller aperature). However, if your relax your eyes (bigger aperature), something far away may not appear as clear.
    but i see photographs of 300mm f/22 of maybe, birds, and the birds are sharp and clear, while the background is totally off. how does that work?

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