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Thread: ND(Neutral Density)

  1. #21
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
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    Default Re: ND(Neutral Density)

    Quote Originally Posted by foxtwo
    OT: photobum, would you happen to know the web reference to the ND plugin that you are using? I'm curious to learn what's the difference in it versus a normal merging of different exposures.
    hehe I also want to learn about that too. I could shoot two shots and bracket teh exposure base on shutter speed ( if I want to freeze the action or blur it) or by apeture ( if I was to control the depth of field ) depending on what final effect I want to create with the finalise picture and then I could merge them in photoshop...thus..extract the best of tones and/or details to get a more perfectly exposure shot.

    Would like a link to that digital ND and why I could not just darken the photo incrementally or dark tint the photo in photoshop. Sorry I am a self taught digital graphic designer so I learn technique by experimenting since Photoshop 3 and I do know there is more then one way(workflow) to archieve the same effect. Just curious about this plug-in and what effect it is able to do that photoshop's own basic tools can already do them to warrant paying US$45 for it. I can see it being worth while if it was a digital grad filter system.


    Photobum,

    Should not have to ask your boss wat! hehe..he owns the software but he does not own the link or company but only bought the software. Or did he developed the software for his own design company to use that is why you have to asked him? Just let us have the link to go read up what this digital ND actually does. From what I read online the digital ND is "over rated" as reviewed by some forums and sites.
    Last edited by sammy888; 22nd December 2005 at 12:51 AM.

  2. #22
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    Default Re: ND(Neutral Density)

    Quote Originally Posted by foxtwo
    the problem with trying to apply ND filters in post process is that highlights that have been overexposed will NOT have details. No post process is going to be able to produce detail when none was recorded in the first place.

    Digital ND plugin may be able reproduce some aspect of a ND filter, but it has its limitations and cannot fully replace a proper filter.
    that's technically true, but u dont use a ND filter to prevent over-exposure rite? so i can safely assume the pics w/o ND filter won't be overexposed, thus negating the need for one in the 1st place.

    :P

  3. #23
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
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    Default Re: ND(Neutral Density)

    Quote Originally Posted by shuy
    that's technically true, but u dont use a ND filter to prevent over-exposure rite?
    :P

    Technically, you use a ND filter to alter the illumination or light latitude of the original scene you are shooting om relation to the capability of your camera.

    Say you are shooting a scenery shot in bright sunlight. The meter reading is f22 at 1/4000 but there is a warning that say the shot is still over expose by say 2 stops (for example). You need to up the shutter speed or close down the f-stop futher by 2X to get the right exposure. But problem is your lens is already at it's smallest apeture of f22. And your camera's fastest speed is 1/4000. So how do you save this situation? You use a 2X ND filter that would lower the light level down by 2 stops into your camera.That is basically what an ND filter is all about. Neutral Density ( ND) is basicaly as I mentioned like sunglasses but being neutral in form will not change the hue of colours in the scene you shoot. It simply darkens enough so that it is within your camera's ability to capture the right exposure as you want it where strong lighting is concern. And doing so also opens up creative ways of using it to product things like that silky smooth river flow or give you the shallow depth of field you need in strong light situation.
    Last edited by sammy888; 22nd December 2005 at 06:08 PM.

  4. #24
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    Default Re: ND(Neutral Density)

    Quote Originally Posted by shuy
    that's technically true, but u dont use a ND filter to prevent over-exposure rite? so i can safely assume the pics w/o ND filter won't be overexposed, thus negating the need for one in the 1st place.

    :P
    To assume a pic w/o ND filter will NOT be overexposed, the following must be observed:

    1. Low contrast scene-> Subject brightness range (SBR) within 5 stops.
    2. No required fix setting of either shutter speed or aperture-> Able to compensate through either shutter spd or aperture for correct exposure.
    3. No desire to capture emphasis of movement-> fast shutter speed.

    When a pic require a ND filter:

    A. High contrast scene-> SBR of above 5 stops. Unable to capture shadow detail without sacrificing highlight detail.
    B. Required fix setting of either shutter speed or aperture-> eg. need short DOF for portraiture but unable to balance for fastest shutter spd for correct exposure.
    C. Able to capture movement at best possible settings but WILL overexpose

    The ND filter is only required for specific instances in specific conditions. Unless you shoot in a controlled environment where lighting and subject distances can be changed to suit your photography needs, then (any) filters are invaluable tools to capture the visualised image in the camera without need for post processing.

    ps. is it 5 stops or 7 stops? can't rem the range. someone backstop me. thx.
    Last edited by foxtwo; 22nd December 2005 at 04:50 PM.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: ND(Neutral Density)

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum
    I will let you know once I find out from my boss. The software is his actually.

    FYI, I am an Adobe Certified Photoshop Professional since 2002, so you can pretty much call me a wizard!
    wah... Wizard! then u can give us a summary of how the ND plugin is different from normal merging?

  6. #26

    Default Re: ND(Neutral Density)

    Quote Originally Posted by foxtwo
    wah... Wizard! then u can give us a summary of how the ND plugin is different from normal merging?
    My boss got that software somewhere on the net. I don't have the web address with me. There was a "link" on the software itself but I guessed the company no longer exists. By the way, he is still merry-making in New Jersey. He will be back after Christmas.

    Yes, this so-called ND filter plug-in works by merging two images into one. There is no denial. The nice part is it allows the user to control the density by f-stops, just like an ND filter. You can even set the software to function like a reverse ND filter; exactly like the ones used by nature photographer Daryl Benson.

    BTW, thanks for calling me a wizard. At least those few months at the "Worthog School of Wizardry" in 2002 weren't wasted.
    Last edited by photobum; 22nd December 2005 at 10:59 PM.

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