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Thread: Newbie Potrait Shot

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Newbie Potrait Shot

    Bro, you chose an overcast day to shoot so shadows are not harsh, but it seems you did not use any sort of reflectors nor flash to fill in the shadows. No, you do not want to DI the images to the extent where the entire shot looks brightly lit. Highlights and lowlights are important as they give depth to a shot. What you should have done was use a reflector or flash set to 1 stop below the ambient lighting to fill in the slightly shadowed areas.
    Also, don't forget the rule of thirds. When you master this you will find that your shots have an extra oomph. Most photographers' weakness is they tend to place their subject right smack in the centre, which I'm glad you did not. Your composition isn't bad but I believe can be improved.
    You were fortunate that your models are quite comfortable in front of the camera so expressions are rather natural. But it is obvious it was a "ready, 1,2,3" kinda thing. Try making your shoots more natural. What I normally do is ask my model to turn and look elsewhere. Then I will say to her where I want her to look when I shoot her and what expression I want. Then I would ask her to turn to me and give me that expression. As soon as she turns and I see what I want, I press the shutter. This way I am able to get much more natural looking expressions. Posing and making a face ends up with too rigid looking expressions, especially with camera-shy subjects. The above works especially well with the camera shy.
    Just another little note in case you have not been informed. The best focal length for portraits is 80 - 105mm (on film cameras. divide by @ 1.5 for digital cameras).
    This is because wider lenses make the face look rounderr and longer lenses flatten the face too much.

  2. #22

    Default Re: Newbie Potrait Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by erizai
    Indeed. I agreed

    Post processing may enhance my work.. but rely too much on it will eventually poison myself from improving.
    I rely on post processing a great deal. I don't believe it had poisoned by photography skill. On the contrary, my images had improved greatly.

    Post processing is of course alast ditch effort to save a badly taken picturee. Relying on this a lotmeans you are a bad photographer. But, post processing is a great tool and a must for ultimate creativity and control of the final output.

    When I start taking a series of images, I frequently have the type of post processing I need to do in mind.
    deadpoet
    my portfolio

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Newbie Potrait Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by Heartshape
    Just another little note in case you have not been informed. The best focal length for portraits is 80 - 105mm (on film cameras. divide by @ 1.5 for digital cameras).
    This is because wider lenses make the face look rounderr and longer lenses flatten the face too much.
    Would you be kind enough to teach me more on this?

    I'm using D70s, 18-70mm. digital factor 1.5

    In my case, what is the range that best for portrait shoot?

    I normarly use 35-70 by cause i noticed if i go below that, there will be slght distortion..

    Your quote of wider lenses means ... I thought that my concept of below 35mm (after x1.5)
    means wide angle?

    With all ears..

  4. #24

    Default Re: Newbie Potrait Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by Heartshape
    Just another little note in case you have not been informed. The best focal length for portraits is 80 - 105mm (on film cameras. divide by @ 1.5 for digital cameras).
    This is because wider lenses make the face look rounderr and longer lenses flatten the face too much.

    I am afraid you have been misinformed. And spreading this misinformation around.

    The best focal length for portrait is 21mm, 24mm, 28mm, 35mm, 50mm, 65mm, 80mm 100mm, 200mm, 400mm, etc

    What am I saying? That any lens can be the "best" focal length for portraits. It depends on what kind of portraits you are making.

    When I say that the "best" focal length for portraits is 80-105mm (35 mm equivqlent), you are talking about a fairly "tight" face shot - which is a very specific type of portraiture. There are "environmental" portraits such as in this thread which will do well with a normal of slightly wide lens.

    In the images presented in this thread, with the exception of #3, all the shots can be made with a 50mm with no distortion of facial features. Even for #3, I think that the distortion will be minimal.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: Newbie Potrait Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by Deadpoet
    I rely on post processing a great deal. I don't believe it had poisoned by photography skill. On the contrary, my images had improved greatly.

    Post processing is of course alast ditch effort to save a badly taken picturee. Relying on this a lotmeans you are a bad photographer. But, post processing is a great tool and a must for ultimate creativity and control of the final output.

    When I start taking a series of images, I frequently have the type of post processing I need to do in mind.
    Yup, the post-processing is also quite a vital part.

    I'm just stating it as an angle from a pure shooter view that enforce him/herself for better images input..

    it also affect the final outcome if the input is bad..

    I dunno at the old day, do people also make a lot of tweaking in the darkroom?
    I mean in order to achieve the artistic effect?

    To student,

    Would you like to enlighten me on the mm things?(21mm, 24mm, 28mm, 35mm, 50mm, 65mm, 80mm 100mm, 200mm, 400mm, etc)

    Is it because in this scale the images will have different effect or minimal distortion?

    Pardon me for so many question..

  6. #26

    Default Re: Newbie Potrait Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by erizai
    I dunno at the old day, do people also make a lot of tweaking in the darkroom?
    I mean in order to achieve the artistic effect?
    Post processing, meaning what you do to the image after you make the shots, is almost always necessary. Even in the "old days". And I am still very much into the "old days" because I find that the inkjet B&W prints do not give me what I want.

    There are many reasons for this. Firstly, the sensor, (film or pixels}, is way inferior to the human eyes. So what you see and what the sensor sees is completely different. So some kind of tweaking is necessary.

    For example, reducing or increasing development time to alter contrast. Using of burning,dodging, flashing, masking, etc are all tools to bring the print to what your eyes see. In actual fact, many of the terms you use in Photoshop are derived from the "post-processing" methodology in the "old days"

    Another reason for post processing is to remove unwanted elements in an image. I was once photographing sandunes at 5.30 am. But someone was earlier than me, and left footprints everywhere! I had to look for other things to photograph. Two artists who happened to be there made "smut" statement "too bad you are a photographer. We don't have to draw/paint the footprints"!

    A third reason for post-processing is artistic interpretation. For example the famous "Moon over Hernandez" by Ansel Adams. Not only was post-processing done tothe print, but PP was also applied to the negative. I have seen first hand the orginal prints and the later (more well known) prints. And they are worlds apart.

    Yes! Definitely! Post-processing is necessary. But the mistake is to use PP as a crutch.

    Quote Originally Posted by erizai
    To student,

    Would you like to enlighten me on the mm things?(21mm, 24mm, 28mm, 35mm, 50mm, 65mm, 80mm 100mm, 200mm, 400mm, etc)

    Is it because in this scale the images will have different effect or minimal distortion?
    What I was saying is that use the tools in their intended purpose or even for its non-intended purpose.

    Example - using a 21 mm lens for a face shot would quite definitely give you a very funny grotesque distorted face with big nose and lips and small eyes. This is what Heartshape was really referring to. If you want a fairly normal face perspective, use an approximately 80-150 mm lens (35mm equivalent).

    However if you are doing an environmental portrait where showing the environment is important, then using a wide lens allows you to "take in more". Besides, a wide lens tend to have a deeper depth of field so your background is more in focus. But exaggerating perspective. Using a 80-150mm lens will reduce what you can include in the frame and also blur the background image more. But on the other hand, they allow you to "compress" perspective that can be interesting.

    Using distortion can also have interesting effects. Perhaps you should leave this for the time being.

    Basically, what I am saying is to understand the characteristic of the lens, and use it to create the effect you want. Do not be locked into "this is the best" mentality.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: Newbie Potrait Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by student
    Basically, what I am saying is to understand the characteristic of the lens, and use it to create the effect you want. Do not be locked into "this is the best" mentality.
    Noted..

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Newbie Potrait Shot

    my suggestion would be rules are there because of a reason, however you can always question that reason and break the rules.

    One of the thing I personally believe is, the only rules in art is, "No Rules."

    I personally dont really care about rules of third, subject must be the brightest area, etc. I mean, those are a guide for you but i dont think it's a rules you must follow.

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