Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 52

Thread: Long lenses in public places...

  1. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    near the Equator
    Posts
    1,255

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Quote Originally Posted by whoelse
    Something like this?
    -

    saw it at Tanglin Mall.
    We live in an age when unnecessary things are our only necessities. - Oscar Wilde

  2. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Somewhere Out There
    Posts
    2,573

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    I have attempted this before and it is really easy....

    When I was in Washington, D.C I went to the white house to shoot twice. One in broad daylight and the other at night. Both times, I used a 100-400L with double stacked TCs. In the daylight image, there was a secret service officer on the roof decked out in armour and carrying personal firearms with a huge bino. Very easily, I could be shot to death right on the spot by another secret service sniper.

    The night image was the eclipse (a wide open field that is in the rear of the White House) and taking the photo from the back. Again, 100-400 with one TC and you can see all the way to the second floor of the White House. I am sure that I was observed as there was a cop in a SUV about 30m behind me. Again, I was not stopped. But when I cross the eclipse, higher security measures were taken as I was about to cross the road.

    Therefore, in light of this I am wondering how would cops in singapore react when our own countrymen take long lenses to shoot public events. Would they ask us to stop and be questioned? Perhaps in the longer run, it would be safer if we were to keep those long lenses for those particular purposes only meaning use long ones for sports and nature shots. If we were to go beyond those boundaries, we can easily be questioned.

    Just thought that I bring this subject out.

  3. #23

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Tanglin Mall? shop selling or someone carrying one? :-0

  4. #24

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Think those t*******t wun be stupid to carry a huge lense out there to shoot, perhaps a Sony DSC-T9/B will do for them, IS somemore.

  5. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Tanah Merah, Singapore
    Posts
    2,799

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Quote Originally Posted by Garion
    Now today you carry 600mm f/4 and D2X and the big girl also will shout to her bf, "wah, see that bad man carrying Axe and bazooka!"

    hey hey hey!! haahahaha... not many Axe and bazooka people where lei! phew! Lucky you and me Mark2 one....
    "A closet Nykon lover"

  6. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Planet Eropagnis
    Posts
    2,944

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Quote Originally Posted by Canonised
    wider than Google Earth?
    Aiyah, hack into NASA Satellite and den steal the images lah.... Better right?
    "Wonders of the Human Mind. Unfathomable to the highest degree."

  7. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Planet Eropagnis
    Posts
    2,944

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Well, I think as long as our conscience is clear and we know what we are shooting and the purpose of our shot, it doesn't matter if we get stopped by 1, 5, 10 or 100 security personnels.

    Understandably there maybe over-zealous security personnels trying to score points with their bosses. If they want to score, let them score. Its not as if u apologise, smile and walk off u're gonna lose a piece of flesh?

    U apologise fevertly and walk off, they score points, make them feel shiok, u get ur image all the same.

    U take a confrontational stance insisting on ur 'human rights', he confronts u with a 'security' thing and prolly a self-imposed or unwritten law. U buay song, he feel shiok (cos exercise his powers. I know the feeling since I was an RP during NS and had the balls to stop anyone from Recruits to COs at the gate). In the end u kena hold back, u waste ur time, he's not wasting his time and u-lose-he-win.

    Stay low, keep low, shoot and scoot. I know digital images are 'free for all' business, but den u shoot once ppl still close one eye. U keep shooting and shooting the same scene over and over again, it pisses ppl off.

    Go for what a sniper does, "One Shot, One Kill", digital or film regardless.
    "Wonders of the Human Mind. Unfathomable to the highest degree."

  8. #28
    vince123123
    Guests

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Why don't you just tell "them" that you are not contactable by mobile simply because its at the guard room Then can go idle liao :P

    Quote Originally Posted by espn
    Please do, then I don't have to find a non-camera phone to use temporarily while I go back for reservist, it's a chore to go back camp, and they want to contact you using your handphone and you can't bring it in because of a blardy camera on it.

    Why can't they have phones without camera

  9. #29

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    So can the guard stop us if we were to take a shot of the embassy for example? What can we do to shoot it then?
    LensView::Say Fromage Productions
    EOS 1DS::EOS 1D MKII::EOS 7D

  10. #30
    Senior Member redstone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Beyond the outer limits
    Posts
    2,898

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Quote Originally Posted by whoelse
    Something like this?
    -


    What's the 'trigger' for?
    Snapping?

  11. #31

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Quote Originally Posted by agape01
    Not sure whether has this perception been discussed in the forum yet...

    Other than using really long and large photography lenses for the pupose of shooting sports and birds, does anyone think that there will be a problem if the police catches you with one for public events?

    Taking into account that you are not the official photographer or press photographer.

    I am aware that in some countries like the US, it might be considered as a terrorist act with the reason of attaining information on government buildings even if the images are for your own personal use.

    I am merely wondering...
    actually in the u.s it is legal to take photographs of anything that is within view of the public. Which means you can go into a shopping mall and take photos of the place and it is completely legal. They have NO right to ask u to delete the photo,.. however they have the right to chase you out.

    not sure about singapore tho.

  12. #32

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Quote Originally Posted by redstone


    What's the 'trigger' for?
    Snapping?
    A trigger like that such kenna stop by police, security guard. Even if the trigger is just to take a pic, sure to create panic.... hahahaha wanna try ... bring my pistol lighter.....
    LensView::Say Fromage Productions
    EOS 1DS::EOS 1D MKII::EOS 7D

  13. #33

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    http://www.usatoday.com/tech/columni...era-laws_x.htm

    very interesting article.. not sure how it applies to singapore..

    New digital camera? Know how, where you can use it
    Digital cameras were one of the hot gifts these holidays — the first one for some people, an upgrade for others. Cell-phone cameras are everywhere too, and sites like Flickr and Buzznet — not to mention photoblogs — make it easy for anyone to share the zillions of photos they're taking.

    With all these cameras snapping around us, I started to wonder about the laws regarding using them. Where can you shoot? What can you shoot?

    A blogger I know shot a picture in an office building. One of the tenants had boxes of medical records sitting around in an unlocked office, visible from the hall. He published a picture of the boxes, which started a little brouhaha: He didn't have permission from the building's landlord, someone said, so he wasn't allowed to take or publish the photos.

    That turns out not to be the case.

    What I discovered is that a lot of people have ideas — often very clear ones — of what is legal and what isn't, based on anything from common sense to wishful thinking to "I always heard…"


    Trouble is, they aren't always right. If you've got a digital camera and like to shoot in public, it pays to know the real deal.

    So I went looking for it. I checked with the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and found its Photographers' Guide to Privacy.

    The Missouri Bar has a terrific Journalists' Right of Privacy Primer by attorney Mark Sableman.

    Bert P. Krages, an attorney in Portland, Ore., and author of the Legal Handbook for Photographers, has a short but excellent PDF document called The Photographer's Right.

    I also had e-mail conversations with both Mssrs. Sableman and Krages (who were both careful to point out that they were only speaking in general terms, and not offering legal advice).

    Finally, I got some background from the American Law Institute's A Concise Restatement of Torts on the Harvard Law website.

    Of course, I'm not a lawyer; in this case I'm a researcher. But lemme tell you: All these sources jibed, which I take to be a good sign. Just don't take this as legal advice; it's one columnist's researched understanding of the law.

    If you can see it, you can shoot it

    Let's get the easy stuff out of the way. Aside from sensitive government buildings (e.g., military bases), if you're on public property you can photograph anything you like, including private property. There are some limits — using a zoom lens to shoot someone who has a reasonable expectation of privacy isn't covered — but no one can come charging out of a business and tell you not to take photos of the building, period.

    Further, they cannot demand your camera or your digital media or film. Well, they can demand it, but you are under no obligation to give it to them. In fact, only an officer of the law or court can take it from you, and then only with a court order. And if they try or threaten you? They can be charged with theft or coercion, and you may even have civil recourse. Cool. (For details, see "The Photographer's Right.")

    It gets better.

    You can take photos any place that's open to the public, whether or not it's private property. A mall, for example, is open to the public. So are most office buildings (at least the lobbies). You don't need permission; if you have permission to enter, you have permission to shoot.

    In fact, there are very few limits to what you're allowed to photograph. Separately, there are few limits to what you're allowed to publish. And the fact that they're separate issues — shooting and publishing — is important. We'll get to that in a moment.

    You can take any photo that does not intrude upon or invade the privacy of a person, if that person has a reasonable expectation of privacy. Someone walking in a mall or on the street? Fair game. Someone standing in a corner, looking at his new Prozac prescription? No. Using a long lens to shoot someone in an apartment? No.

    Note that the limits have nothing to do with where you are when you take the shots; it's all about the subject's expectation of privacy. You can be on private property (a mall or office-building lobby), or even be trespassing and still legally take pictures. Whether you can be someplace and whether you can take pictures are two completely separate issues.

    Chances are you can publish it

    Publishing photos has some different restraints, although they're civil, not criminal. Break one of these "rules" and, while you won't go to jail, you could find yourself on the short end of a lawsuit. (Although, according to the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, "the subject's remedy usually will not include the ability to bar the publication of the picture.")

    Revealing private facts about someone is a no-no.
    As the American Law Institute put it, "One who gives publicity to a matter concerning the private life of another is subject to liability to the other for invasion of his privacy, if the matter publicized is of a kind that A) would be highly offensive to a reasonable person, and B) is not of legitimate concern to the public."

    Here the private property issue comes a bit more into play. Publishing a recognizable photo of someone at an AA meeting could be a problem, even if that meeting is open to the public. (An elected official, perhaps, but not of Joe Citizen.)

    You also can find yourself in civil court if you publish a shot that places a person in a false light. That might be more of an issue with the caption than with the photo; running a shot of the mayor and his daughter labeled "Mayor meets with porn star" could land you in hot water. (Assuming his daughter isn't a porn star.)

    Finally, you can't use someone's likeness for a purely commercial purpose — using a photo of someone in an ad, for example. That isn't to say you can't publish a photo in a commercial environment, such as a newspaper or a blog that accepts ads. If the photo is being used in a news or artistic sense as opposed to a commercial one you're OK.

    Risk factors

    The fact that taking a photo and publishing it are separate things might go against some folks' common sense.

    Let's say you're banned by the local mall for taking photos there, but you go back anyway and take more. Now you're trespassing. But unless the photos you take violate someone's expectation of privacy, your taking photos isn't illegal — only being there.

    That said, if you're arrested and convicted, a judge might use the fact that you were taking photos to increase the penalty, but shooting on private property isn't a crime in and of itself. As one lawyer told me, "I don't see why the act of trespass would turn something that occurs during the trespass into a tort if it wasn't one already."

    There are some other risks to taking and publishing 'problematic' photos. But, as you'll see, they're easy to avoid.

    Trespassing is an obvious problem. If you're not supposed to be someplace — you see a sign or you're told by the property owner, for example — you can get arrested. Sure, you might be able to publish the photos you take, but Web access from jail is limited. (Trespassing is almost always a misdemeanor, by the way.)

    You might be charged with your state's variation of intrusion — using technology (e.g., a long lens, hidden camera, or parabolic microphone) — to access a place where the subject has an expectation of privacy.

    Beyond trespass, the major risks you run are civil, not criminal. You can lose an invasion of privacy lawsuit if your photographs reveal private facts about a person that are offensive and not newsworthy when the person had a reasonable expectation of privacy. Ditto if they place the person in a false light, or inappropriately use the specific person's image for commercial purposes, e.g., stating that the mayor endorses a product by publishing a photo of him using it.

    All of this should be good news for amateur and professional shutterbugs. Carry your camera, shoot to your heart's content, and know your rights — and your risks.

    Andrew Kantor is a technology writer, pundit, and know-it-all who covers technology for the Roanoke Times. He's also a former editor for PC Magazine and Internet World. Read more of his work at kantor.com. His column appears Fridays on USATODAY.com

  14. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Somewhere Out There
    Posts
    2,573

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Quote Originally Posted by trlnlty
    actually in the u.s it is legal to take photographs of anything that is within view of the public. Which means you can go into a shopping mall and take photos of the place and it is completely legal. They have NO right to ask u to delete the photo,.. however they have the right to chase you out.

    not sure about singapore tho.
    What you have stated is true, but what happens if you have a photo of a secret service agent on the roof of the White House? What then? Is it still completely legal or would whatever federal enforcement agency perceive that your image is for terrorist purposes.

  15. #35

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Quote Originally Posted by agape01
    What you have stated is true, but what happens if you have a photo of a secret service agent on the roof of the White House? What then? Is it still completely legal or would whatever federal enforcement agency perceive that your image is for terrorist purposes.

    what they perceive and what they can proof are 2 different things..

    it is alright to take him standing on the roof, but it is illegal to take a photo of him in the room thru the window with a zoom lens ...

  16. #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Somewhere Out There
    Posts
    2,573

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Quote Originally Posted by trlnlty
    You can take photos any place that's open to the public, whether or not it's private property. A mall, for example, is open to the public. So are most office buildings (at least the lobbies). You don't need permission; if you have permission to enter, you have permission to shoot.

    In fact, there are very few limits to what you're allowed to photograph. Separately, there are few limits to what you're allowed to publish. And the fact that they're separate issues — shooting and publishing — is important. We'll get to that in a moment.
    Thanks for your article.

    This was my experience at the Marriot hotel in Singapore. I was having high tea with a friend and I went to take shots of the food presented in the buffet line. After taking about 5 shots, I was told by one of the staff that photography isn't allowed.

    In this instance, to your opinion do you perceive that I still have the right to take those kind of pictures?

    I would have to add that what you've presented is very much applicable in the US, but over here in Singapore we are governed by a lot of unspoken rules.

  17. #37
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Tampines, Singapore.
    Posts
    1,899

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Quote Originally Posted by trlnlty
    actually in the u.s it is legal to take photographs of anything that is within view of the public. Which means you can go into a shopping mall and take photos of the place and it is completely legal. They have NO right to ask u to delete the photo,.. however they have the right to chase you out.

    not sure about singapore tho.

    I do not think the INSIDE of a shopping mall is considered public places. it is private property with the owner allowing public to enter during specific times. otherwise there will be no closing hours and they will have no right to chase you out.

    hence, they also have the right to deny you taking pictures.

    but then again, laws can be strange and convoluted. Perhaps do research on local laws that are applicable. Or even what is applicable in the UK.
    Last edited by hwchoy; 11th January 2006 at 03:07 PM.

  18. #38
    Deregistered
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Planet Nikon
    Posts
    21,905

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Quote Originally Posted by vince123123
    Why don't you just tell "them" that you are not contactable by mobile simply because its at the guard room Then can go idle liao :P
    Then when I'm not in camp they can still contact me... which is what I want to totally avoid

  19. #39
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Clementi, Singapore
    Posts
    2,836

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Quote Originally Posted by engowen
    should all mobilephone with camera ban here? how abouut banning all mobilephone as it can trigger bomb? ....
    why not ban all people from singapore, then nothing can happen, all this controversy over mobile phones cameras and big lenses goes away!

  20. #40
    Senior Member redstone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Beyond the outer limits
    Posts
    2,898

    Default Re: Long lenses in public places...

    Ban electricity.

    Electricity needed to run machinery to make equipment that makes bombs.... Ban all forms of electricity too.

    No batteries to operate any remote control. No power, can't detonate anything.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •