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Thread: Skylight and Correction Filters Problems

  1. #1

    Default Skylight and Correction Filters Problems

    I was using a skylight filter on day on one of my lenses and it sort of alters my D70's colour balance. On top of that, it flared like crazy and there was a pink cast caused by the 1B correction.

    Anyone also experienced this before?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Skylight and Correction Filters Problems

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluorite
    I was using a skylight filter on day on one of my lenses and it sort of alters my D70's colour balance. On top of that, it flared like crazy and there was a pink cast caused by the 1B correction.

    Anyone also experienced this before?
    Yes. Some additional flaring is unavoidable even with super-duper-multiple-specially-coated filters, not to talk about less expensive ones. And the changed/pinkish colour cast is the principal purpose of a skylight 1B filter.

    If you want a weaker effect, get a skylight 1A. If you want the best possible picture quality, don't use any unnecessary filters.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Skylight and Correction Filters Problems

    I thought the 1B is supposed to compensate for the blue light but it is producing a pink cast I can see.

    But you know what is the best part?

    Flare+Pink Cast (tt inteferes with my WB)= Disasterous Image

    Well, you should get what I mean.

    That's when the all-time debated question comes in:
    To protect the lens with a filter or not to? I am still in a dilemma.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Skylight and Correction Filters Problems

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluorite
    I thought the 1B is supposed to compensate for the blue light but it is producing a pink cast I can see.

    But you know what is the best part?

    Flare+Pink Cast (tt inteferes with my WB)= Disasterous Image

    Well, you should get what I mean.

    That's when the all-time debated question comes in:
    To protect the lens with a filter or not to? I am still in a dilemma.
    I can get away with most situations with my 1A. In fact, I find the 1A is about the only Skylight that I dare to use...

    If you pop over to my BBT thread, you can see the effect of the 1A on the outdoor shots.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Skylight and Correction Filters Problems

    Skylights are traditionally meant to warm up flesh tones in portraiture. If you don't like it, you should switch to a UV or NC filter instead.

    You shouldn't be encountering any serious flare unless you are shooting into light sources.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Skylight and Correction Filters Problems

    I was shooting into the sun. Guess that was the root of most problems. But it is ridiculous not to shoot into the sun for practical purposes.

    Actually, do we need skylights for digital at all when we can fine-tune the white balance of the camera?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Skylight and Correction Filters Problems

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluorite
    I was shooting into the sun. Guess that was the root of most problems. But it is ridiculous not to shoot into the sun for practical purposes.
    Have you tried taking a photo without any filter under the same conditions? You still might get flare. That's just limitations of the technology.

    Actually, do we need skylights for digital at all when we can fine-tune the white balance of the camera?
    Filters can achieve some specific things that cannot be reproduced in postprocessing. However, I suspect the majority of filter ownsers don't use them in this capacity. People might also buy/use filters because the salesperson said so, or because their friends do, or because a large set of camera/lens accessories gives them that "professional" feeling.

    I would guess that in the vast majority of cases, filters (especially UV and "protection" filters) do much more harm than good.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Skylight and Correction Filters Problems

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf
    Have you tried taking a photo without any filter under the same conditions? You still might get flare. That's just limitations of the technology.



    Filters can achieve some specific things that cannot be reproduced in postprocessing. However, I suspect the majority of filter ownsers don't use them in this capacity. People might also buy/use filters because the salesperson said so, or because their friends do, or because a large set of camera/lens accessories gives them that "professional" feeling.

    I would guess that in the vast majority of cases, filters (especially UV and "protection" filters) do much more harm than good.
    I think it is pretty much of a filter flare. Shots with the lens itself only brought about halos and not much contrast degradation.

    But come to think of it, skylights are supposed to warm up the image right? Can we finetune WB instead to achieve a similar effect?

  9. #9

    Default Re: Skylight and Correction Filters Problems

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluorite
    I think it is pretty much of a filter flare. Shots with the lens itself only brought about halos and not much contrast degradation.
    It might or might not be. What filter were you using? AFAIK, not many lenses can withstand shooting into the light without flaring.

    But come to think of it, skylights are supposed to warm up the image right? Can we finetune WB instead to achieve a similar effect?
    Yes, definitely.

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    Default Re: Skylight and Correction Filters Problems

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluorite
    I think it is pretty much of a filter flare. Shots with the lens itself only brought about halos and not much contrast degradation.
    My point was that even the best lenses are not completely free of flaring and that the expectation of flare-free images when shooting straight into the sun is not very realistic.

    But come to think of it, skylights are supposed to warm up the image right? Can we finetune WB instead to achieve a similar effect?
    For giving warmer image tones, of course. But skylight filters can also reduce haze in landscape photos (to an extent, don't expect wonders). This is something that cannot be emulated afterwards.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Skylight and Correction Filters Problems

    So I guess a UV filter would be best. Thanks littlewolf, for clarifying and ensuring some stuff here.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Skylight and Correction Filters Problems

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluorite
    So I guess a UV filter would be best.
    That's your personal conclusion... mine is that no filter is best .

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