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Thread: Olympus E-Systems: Full Frame

  1. #1
    Member ernie_ng81's Avatar
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    Default Olympus E-Systems: Full Frame

    Dudes,

    I think iv seen the word full frame somewhere before on the specs.

    Are all the oly cameras really Full Frame? like the canon 5D?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Olympus E-Systems: Full Frame

    Quote Originally Posted by ernie_ng81
    Dudes,

    I think iv seen the word full frame somewhere before on the specs.

    Are all the oly cameras really Full Frame? like the canon 5D?
    They are full frame in that the lenses are designed for the sensor size so no magnification factor. The Canon 5D is full frame as in 35mm film size. I think the sensor is larger than the one on the E-systems.

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    Member ernie_ng81's Avatar
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    Default Re: Olympus E-Systems: Full Frame

    Quote Originally Posted by KCLow
    They are full frame in that the lenses are designed for the sensor size so no magnification factor. The Canon 5D is full frame as in 35mm film size. I think the sensor is larger than the one on the E-systems.
    Hmm... so is it that the full frame sensors on the oly e-systems make them one up from the rest of the cameras? other than the canon 5d?

  4. #4

    Default Re: Olympus E-Systems: Full Frame

    It's a whole diff 'format'...

    just like our lenses. Our 14mm is still 14mm (not 28mm!), but it gives an equivalent field of view to a 28mm lens on a full frame 35mm SLR camera....

    So for a 4/3 camera, which is designed to have a 4/3 inch sized sensor, the E-system camera with its 4/3 inch sized sensor is full frame.

    For a 35mm format camera, which was designed for 35mm sized film, the 5D which has a 35mm size sensor is full frame.
    For a 35mm format camera, which has an APS size sensor(smaller than full-frame and slightly bigger than 4/3) the angle of view captured by the sensor is reduced by a factor. And the equivalant FOV would be the focal lengh x crop factor.
    Last edited by hammer_400; 16th November 2005 at 01:01 AM.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Olympus E-Systems: Full Frame

    Its probably referring to the full-frame transfer Kodak CCD as opposed to an Interline Transfer CCD used in other DSLRs.

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    Default Re: Olympus E-Systems: Full Frame

    Some info about the term "full frame transfer" and demo:

    http://www.olympus-europa.com/consumer/dslr_6839.htm

    As for the term "full frame" as used by other manufacturers, the 4/3 sensor is 100% of the 4/3 standard, it IS full frame (of the 4/3 standard).

  7. #7

    Default Re: Olympus E-Systems: Full Frame

    Full Frame format and Full Frame Transfer CCD refer to 2 different things.

    Why this term Full Frame format always appear is because, on some camera system, you don't really get the 'actual' frame of what the lenses are designed to project, at least the older legacy lenses, especially those good and expensive ones. So, some people would actually prefer full frame format to leverage the existing lenses.

    As for the E-system, usually people talk about Full Frame transfer CCD rather than Full Frame format, because, all current 4/3 lenses are designed for this very format. There's not much issue on whether it's Full Frame format or not.

    So, for Full Frame Transfer CCD, you may refer to the link provided my mikefellh above.

  8. #8
    Member ernie_ng81's Avatar
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    Default Re: Olympus E-Systems: Full Frame

    Quote Originally Posted by ykkok
    Full Frame format and Full Frame Transfer CCD refer to 2 different things.

    Why this term Full Frame format always appear is because, on some camera system, you don't really get the 'actual' frame of what the lenses are designed to project, at least the older legacy lenses, especially those good and expensive ones. So, some people would actually prefer full frame format to leverage the existing lenses.

    As for the E-system, usually people talk about Full Frame transfer CCD rather than Full Frame format, because, all current 4/3 lenses are designed for this very format. There's not much issue on whether it's Full Frame format or not.

    So, for Full Frame Transfer CCD, you may refer to the link provided my mikefellh above.
    So, could I say then that the Olympus E-system's Full Frame Transfer CCD would make it better than the other DSLRs in respect to a sharper all rounded image?

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    Default Re: Olympus E-Systems: Full Frame

    Quote Originally Posted by ernie_ng81
    So, could I say then that the Olympus E-system's Full Frame Transfer CCD would make it better than the other DSLRs in respect to a sharper all rounded image?
    all i can say is it is sharp edge to edge with zuiko lenses. cant comment about the rest of the 4/3 partners except cheaper sigma.

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    Default Re: Olympus E-Systems: Full Frame

    Quote Originally Posted by ernie_ng81
    So, could I say then that the Olympus E-system's Full Frame Transfer CCD would make it better than the other DSLRs in respect to a sharper all rounded image?
    Hi Ernie,

    IMO, the FFT CCD technology supplies Olympus' image processing circuitry with an information rich base image whose digital signals are high in quality & dynamic range.

    Cheers

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    Default Olympus the new Leica of the Digital World?

    Quote Originally Posted by ernie_ng81
    So, could I say then that the Olympus E-system's Full Frame Transfer CCD would make it better than the other DSLRs in respect to a sharper all rounded image?
    I am not too sure about the FF Transfer CCD giving you a sharper image or dynamic range but it is a known fact that Olympus makes the very best 'made-for-digital' lenses in the market and reviews have shown that Digital Zuiko lenses deliver the sharpest images, edge to edge, for their respective FOV and price range.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Olympus E-Systems: Full Frame

    Quote Originally Posted by ernie_ng81
    So, could I say then that the Olympus E-system's Full Frame Transfer CCD would make it better than the other DSLRs in respect to a sharper all rounded image?
    Full Frame Transfer (FFT) CCD doesn't really translate to sharper images, but it does allow a sensor with the same pixel size comparing to non-FFT CCD to capture more info (lights) relatively. This provide better dynamic range/latitude where details in deeper shadow and bright higlights are better maintained.

    With more information, coupled with Olympus processing circuitory and those good Zuiko Digital glasses, the E-System is capable of producing very detailed, punchy and film/slide like images.

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