Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: How to use batts with halogen bulb?

  1. #1

    Default How to use batts with halogen bulb?

    Hi can anyone help? Anyone know how to use batteries with halogen bulbs? the circuit required?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Perth Australia
    Posts
    2,548

    Default Re: How to use batts with halogen bulb?

    Originally posted by hoppinghippo
    Hi can anyone help? Anyone know how to use batteries with halogen bulbs? the circuit required?
    No special circuit is required, just make sure you get the battery voltage correct for the bulb.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  3. #3

    Default

    If you're referring to the 50-watt halogen bulbs, there are 2 variants. One uses 12V DC and requires a transformer when using household current. Use this one. There's another type that takes 220V AC. Don't use this one.

  4. #4

    Default

    hhhmmm I was thinking of 20W rated at 12V one, but if use batts then how to calculate? P=IV rite? so I need 12V with 1 plus A? how to get current of 1A with batts? reason for this is I was thinknig of upgrading a Kaiser slide viewer (diascope) which uses normal torchlight bulb with orange hue typical of incandescent bulbs. so don't want to use household current else not portable!

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    6,405

    Default

    Originally posted by hoppinghippo
    hhhmmm I was thinking of 20W rated at 12V one, but if use batts then how to calculate? P=IV rite? so I need 12V with 1 plus A? how to get current of 1A with batts? reason for this is I was thinknig of upgrading a Kaiser slide viewer (diascope) which uses normal torchlight bulb with orange hue typical of incandescent bulbs. so don't want to use household current else not portable!

    Er.... don't try. The heat from the 12V halogen lamp would probably melt the plastic casing. Yes, you would need batteries capable of delivering 1+ A if you want to use a 20W 12V halogen lamp.

    Regards
    CK

  6. #6

    Default

    Originally posted by hoppinghippo
    hhhmmm I was thinking of 20W rated at 12V one, but if use batts then how to calculate? P=IV rite? so I need 12V with 1 plus A? how to get current of 1A with batts? reason for this is I was thinknig of upgrading a Kaiser slide viewer (diascope) which uses normal torchlight bulb with orange hue typical of incandescent bulbs. so don't want to use household current else not portable!

    how about white LEDs?

  7. #7

    Default

    I tried white leds but the light is too concentrated on one spot, difficult to diffuse it over the whole screen. wow never knew halogens can get so hot!!! ah well ok nevermind, will be getting cabin lightbox anyway! thanx for all your advice!

  8. #8

    Default

    Darrel!!!... You are making your own portable studio light ar?? Any good models to do potrait shoots anot??

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Northwest
    Posts
    5,011

    Default

    Originally posted by hoppinghippo
    I tried white leds but the light is too concentrated on one spot, difficult to diffuse it over the whole screen. wow never knew halogens can get so hot!!! ah well ok nevermind, will be getting cabin lightbox anyway! thanx for all your advice!
    If you use LEDs then due to the small size and angle of view (usually around 30 degrees from axis) then you will need to use a grid array (maybe 3 X 3) to cover the entire area, and maybe with the need to add a diffuser screen.
    As complexity rises, precise statements lose meaning and meaningful statements lose precision.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Northwest
    Posts
    5,011

    Default

    Originally posted by ckiang



    Er.... don't try. The heat from the 12V halogen lamp would probably melt the plastic casing. Yes, you would need batteries capable of delivering 1+ A if you want to use a 20W 12V halogen lamp.

    Regards
    CK
    A 20W halogen bulb should be as hot as a 20W normal incandescent light bulb.

    The question is, how much light do you need? Do you really need the brightness of a 20W halogen bulb?

    For a 20W 12V rated halogen bulb, maybe it can be driven at a lower voltage, which will give the right amount of illumination for your application.

    What is the rating of the exisitng bulb in the slide viewer?
    As complexity rises, precise statements lose meaning and meaningful statements lose precision.

  11. #11

    Default

    the current bulb in the slide viewer is only the normal torchlight kind: 2.5V. this kinda feels like Tim Allen's Tool Time show, "arrrrrruuuuuu" more power more power!!! hahaha 12V to replace 2.5V. Actually the 20W was the lowest I saw, unless there's smaller ratings. and I"m assuming halogen bulbs give white light too.

    As for LEDs, yeah need to cover the whole area due to small angle (but never knew its 30deg, thanx roy) but again assuming can get diffusing screen effective enough. problem is one led (Ultra Bright White Led) cost $2.50 so buy 9 oredi $20 plus. including other parts, plus need to find effective diffusing screen, wah not worth it liao!

    Nivlek aka Kelvin: NO LAH!!! this is to view slides only lah! what model model?? I also wish got model to snap!

    I did all this partly out of the fun of DIY-ing and to get more effective slide viewer. Incidentally for those interested, LEDs are quite fun and useful to try out. cuz you can make a simple, cheap and effective tiny torchlight for use at nite when you want to check your camera's settings. they come in many colours too!

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Perth Australia
    Posts
    2,548

    Default

    Originally posted by hoppinghippo
    the current bulb in the slide viewer is only the normal torchlight kind: 2.5V. this kinda feels like Tim Allen's Tool Time show, "arrrrrruuuuuu" more power more power!!! hahaha 12V to replace 2.5V. Actually the 20W was the lowest I saw, unless there's smaller ratings. and I"m assuming halogen bulbs give white light too.
    For a low voltage like 2.5V DC try using one of the so called "Kryptonite" bulbs as used in Maglites etc. Some one in Sim Lim tower should stock them. You'll have to rig a new lamp holder up though.

    There are also other alternatives, such as changing the exisiting bulb to a brighter bulb, eg: 6V, 9V or 12V and using a plugpack type power adapter to power the lamp.
    Last edited by Ian; 31st October 2002 at 02:49 AM.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Northwest
    Posts
    5,011

    Default

    Originally posted by hoppinghippo
    the current bulb in the slide viewer is only the normal torchlight kind: 2.5V. this kinda feels like Tim Allen's Tool Time show, "arrrrrruuuuuu" more power more power!!! hahaha 12V to replace 2.5V. Actually the 20W was the lowest I saw, unless there's smaller ratings. and I"m assuming halogen bulbs give white light too.

    As for LEDs, yeah need to cover the whole area due to small angle (but never knew its 30deg, thanx roy) but again assuming can get diffusing screen effective enough. problem is one led (Ultra Bright White Led) cost $2.50 so buy 9 oredi $20 plus. including other parts, plus need to find effective diffusing screen, wah not worth it liao!

    Nivlek aka Kelvin: NO LAH!!! this is to view slides only lah! what model model?? I also wish got model to snap!

    I did all this partly out of the fun of DIY-ing and to get more effective slide viewer. Incidentally for those interested, LEDs are quite fun and useful to try out. cuz you can make a simple, cheap and effective tiny torchlight for use at nite when you want to check your camera's settings. they come in many colours too!
    I believe you can drive a 20W 12V halogen bulb at a lower voltage to reduce the brightness. The rating specifies the maximum operating voltage and the power consumption at that voltage. What I do not know is the relation between power consumption (brightness) and the voltage supply. It is most likely not linear. You will have to experiment with a variable voltage supply to find the opimum voltage that works for you.

    Also, I don't think that halogen bulb gives white light. For that matter, I also don't think the Kripton bulb gives white light.

    Over here in the states, I have seen miniature flourescent lights that run on 2 AA batteries and are about the size of a small palm sized digital organizer. Not sure if they can be found in Singapore.

    LED viewing angle can range from 10 to 180 degrees, depending on the package and lens (if any) design. For the popular T 1 3/4 package (5mm diameter with leads), a viewing angle of 30 degrees is quite typical.
    As complexity rises, precise statements lose meaning and meaningful statements lose precision.

  14. #14

    Default

    Darrel, why don't you try using some of those new super bright car headlamp bulbs? Perhaps they can help. These stuff run at 12V DC. Only problem you will hav is heat. Maybe you can make a thermoset case with a huge heatsink on it plus 2 3.5 inch fans. I think should not be a problem, cars leave their headlamps on for ages without blowing.

  15. #15

    Default

    Ian: hhhmmm that IS an idea but yeah I wonder if it's white light too and how much it'll cost since it's branded bulb (maglite)

    Roy: I believe that flourescent tube is a Cold Cathode Flourescent Tube. Its the same kind that's used in slim light boxes like those by Kaiser or Cabin. We do have them here but not easy to find and those available that I"ve seen aren't very white and only come in a standard long size.

    Nivlek: I ain't tim allen lah, if I was I"d used FLOOD LIGHTS a long time ago!!! LOL!!!

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Perth Australia
    Posts
    2,548

    Default

    Originally posted by hoppinghippo
    Ian: hhhmmm that IS an idea but yeah I wonder if it's white light too and how much it'll cost since it's branded bulb (maglite)
    Kryptonite is a generic term for a Xenon bulb! Shouldn't cost more than a couple of bucks each.

    Now down to the colour temperature (CT) issues.

    I've just measured the CT on a couple of torches here and both were near 3400 deg K CT.

    Generalising here a bit, here's a list of common bulbs and their CTs

    Halogen: 2800
    Photoflood: 3400
    Torch: (normal) 3000-3400
    Xenon: 4300-4700
    Daylight: (sun) 5,200-5,500
    Standard Lightbox: 5,000

    Dimming a lamp generally changes the colour temperature quite dramatically.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  17. #17

    Default

    Looks like xenon's the closest where bulbs are concerned! Know where to get? esp get cheap?

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Perth Australia
    Posts
    2,548

    Default

    Originally posted by hoppinghippo
    Looks like xenon's the closest where bulbs are concerned! Know where to get? esp get cheap?
    I dunno where you'd get them in Singapore, but Sim Lim tower is where I'd start .. the home of the electronics shops in Singapore
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  19. #19

    Default

    I"ve been there many times but don't recall seeing xenon bulbs around. maybe cuz too busy staring at chio bu in the shop!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •