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Thread: TV tuners?

  1. #1

    Default TV tuners?

    hey guys, anyone know what are TV tuners? the concept sounds interesting, but what exactly do they do? does it mean i can record shows on my PC? if so, do they include Cable TV shows or just free to air shows?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: TV tuners?

    its so 'old' technology...

    anyway TV tuners for PC is same like the tuner on the TV, it will receive signals and convert to images from that frequency area.

    Cable channels are encoded, and only can be decoded with a decoder box or relevant software.
    Logging Off. "You have 2,631 messages stored, of a total 400 allowed." don't PM me.

  3. #3

    Default Re: TV tuners?

    can buy those digital tv receiver much better quality than analog

  4. #4

    Default Re: TV tuners?

    Yes it has been ard for quite some time

    You can schedule it to record tv programmes. Most come with radio tuners as well. I'm using a leadtek one for yrs without problems.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: TV tuners?

    Quote Originally Posted by ycchen
    can buy those digital tv receiver much better quality than analog
    is there already digital tv in singapore?

  6. #6

    Default Re: TV tuners?

    Quote Originally Posted by Drudkh
    is there already digital tv in singapore?
    Erm starhub?

  7. #7

    Default Re: TV tuners?

    i think there is DTV in singapore, but not sure which channels, most likely ch5 ch8 ch u have it,

    http://www.corporate.mediacorp.sg/tv/digital.htm

    must be aware the difference of digital cable tv (still have to pay) and digital tv (free to air)

    must also change your tv set to HDTV such as LCD or PDP
    Last edited by ycchen; 12th November 2005 at 10:31 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: TV tuners?

    what's PDP?
    I currently have WinTV Go analog tv tuner.

  9. #9

    Default Re: TV tuners?

    Quote Originally Posted by Drudkh
    what's PDP?
    I currently have WinTV Go analog tv tuner.
    Plasma Display Panel

  10. #10

    Default Re: TV tuners?

    Quote Originally Posted by maritimus831
    hey guys, anyone know what are TV tuners? the concept sounds interesting, but what exactly do they do? does it mean i can record shows on my PC? if so, do they include Cable TV shows or just free to air shows?
    All the rage - especially with Digital TV.

    This is what www.mythtv.org and Windows Media Centre are for.

    Cable TV is generally encypted or scambled some how, as are many satalite channels.

    Many tuner cards also have S-Video in (I have a Digital TV reciever card that has a S-Video capture connector).

    There is an adon for MythTV called an 'irblaster' that transmits IR codes. You connect your cable box's video out to the video in of the PC, put the 'IR Blaster' over the cable box's IR reciever, and when Myth want's to record a cable channel it sends the appropate fake remote control commands to the cable box so that the PC's video IN port can record the program.

    A lot of the cable TV and satelite set top boxes actually run Linux. Some run Embeded Windows. Your cable box is just another computer inside anyway.

    I actually have a small form factor PC on order that will be connected to our TV. It's only job will be to run MythTV and be a video recorder and digital TV tuner.

    Digital recorders that record to hard disk allow 'fun' features like 'chase view', you can watch a program you are recording from the start, while it is still being recorded. The ablity to pause and/or rewind live TV broadcasts is provided - a small 'buffer' of live TV is recorded to disk, allowing you to step back and look at something again. If you hit 'pause', it just starts saving from that point to disk, storing until you hit play again. (And now that you are behind the 'live' transmission, you can fast forward to catch up!)

  11. #11

    Default Re: TV tuners?

    Starhub's digital TV is actually just a set top box that receives partial digital signals, and converts them to analogue + the digital features; of which have existed in several countries long before, like BBCi for BBC in UK.

    Of course, if you have a HDTV or digital tv tuner, you will get the digital + digital features signals. Have not tried, but was told by a friend that you will get a 16:9 HDTV resolution, however with the channel logo, digital features all in the 4:3 section, even in 16:9 mode.

    Local free-to-air terrestrial television channels is however, at this point of time, not entirely digitalised yet. So you can't actually receive digital signal from our normal antennas yet. But MediaCorp did stated that it will be "quite soon" during the launch of TVMobile, so it should be around 2005-2007 I supposed, and with the proposal of legalising satellite TV, they might just speed up their process.

    The good thing with digital is that you can far better picture and sound quality; imagine watching your movies in 16:9 with multiple sound channels, not on a DVD, but a LOCAL TV channel like Channel 5! And if you hates subtitles, you will probably be given the function to off it, or change its language.

    Correct me if I am wrong in any part.

  12. #12

    Default Re: TV tuners?

    Quote Originally Posted by Slivester

    Of course, if you have a HDTV or digital tv tuner, you will get the digital + digital features signals. Have not tried, but was told by a friend that you will get a 16:9 HDTV resolution, however with the channel logo, digital features all in the 4:3 section, even in 16:9 mode.
    Depends on what the broadcaster is transmitting. The 'DVB-T' digital standard allows either, also allowing swapping between 4:3 and 16:9 depending on the program.
    In Australia every thing on 'digital' is sent in 16:9 format, even if it's 4:3 content, they transmit the picture with 'pillars' down the side. This results in odd effects if you were displaying in 16:9 letterbox mode on a 4:3 screen - you end up with the picture surounded on all sides by black bars. I normally run my system in 16:9 zoom, where the sides of 16:9 content are cut off. (I don't have a wide screen TV), so the black bars are cut off.
    Due to the number of 4:3 sets out there, they put the channel ID in the '4:3 safe area' so that it's still seen on 4:3 sets that are cutting the sides off the 16:9 transmission.
    The other 'special features' are basicly software in the decoder, and it can put it's text where ever it likes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Slivester

    The good thing with digital is that you can far better picture and sound quality; imagine watching your movies in 16:9 with multiple sound channels, not on a DVD, but a LOCAL TV channel like Channel 5! And if you hates subtitles, you will probably be given the function to off it, or change its language.
    What the broadcaster sends varies here. There is 'Standard Definition' and 'High Definition', and several variants of both. The number and type of sound channels is variable, depending on what the broadcaster wants to send.

    Subtitles are done using a teletext like system. Cause this is built into digital from the start, you can now assume that every one has a subtitle decoder and do the subtitles in a data subchannel instead of writing them onto the picture channel as an overlay image.

    In Australia as far as I know, no broadcaster has ever sent a proper 5:1 audio signal, they are sending PCM stereo (mandated fall back mode) and AC3 stereo. If you want suround you have to do the same demux as you did on analogue to the AC3 channels. The broadcasters are also transmitting very little HD content - basicly only enough to satisfy their broadcast licence conditions. The stations want to 'multichannel' and not 'waste' bandwidth on High Definition and 5:1 sound and are lobbying hard to get the mandated HD channels dropped and the multichannel ban lifted.

    Is Singapore going to use the DVB system or the US ATSC ?. Seems most of the world has gone DVB-T for terrestrial digital TV. The US has it's own, which it appears Korea has also adopted.

    I've learnt alot about DVB-T and DVB-S mucking about with streaming TV at work. (Replacing an analogue 'remodulator' system like you find in hotels with a digital system based on playback software on people's PCs).

  13. #13

    Default Re: TV tuners?

    Quote Originally Posted by matthew
    Subtitles are done using a teletext like system. Cause this is built into digital from the start, you can now assume that every one has a subtitle decoder and do the subtitles in a data subchannel instead of writing them onto the picture channel as an overlay image.
    I always thought subtitles are embedded to the video itself before transmitting. But yeah recalling seeing all those out of sync subtitles, now I realised.

    Quote Originally Posted by matthew
    In Australia as far as I know, no broadcaster has ever sent a proper 5:1 audio signal, they are sending PCM stereo (mandated fall back mode) and AC3 stereo. If you want suround you have to do the same demux as you did on analogue to the AC3 channels. The broadcasters are also transmitting very little HD content - basicly only enough to satisfy their broadcast licence conditions. The stations want to 'multichannel' and not 'waste' bandwidth on High Definition and 5:1 sound and are lobbying hard to get the mandated HD channels dropped and the multichannel ban lifted.
    AC-3 is actually the Dolby Digital sound format that sort of gives you the 5.1 surround sound "effect", but of course its compressed, and so you are right, no broadcaster ever did so. Its financially stretching; I heard from a review on BBC if I am not wrong. But governments tend to mention it as 5.1 format I presume, to give that wow-factor. Certainly AC-3 does give a rise quality-wise I guess?

    Quote Originally Posted by matthew
    Is Singapore going to use the DVB system or the US ATSC ?. Seems most of the world has gone DVB-T for terrestrial digital TV. The US has it's own, which it appears Korea has also adopted.
    DVB, reason being existing infrastructure are only technically-fleasible enough and also flexible enough to transmit DVB content. Haha, I am not quite filled with the technical specifications into ATSC or ISDB-T, so I can't touch on that.

    This thread gives me an urge to get a digital tv tuner as well. Argh.

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