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Thread: Need advice : interiors shooting

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spark Sue View Post

    Wow, thanks again for all the advice here!
    Just went out and tried some of the cameras..it's seem alot and the sound of taking the photo..(click click)..amazing..haha
    Will definitely start on what's required when getting my camera.

    Noted on the tripod and the tips given, will definitely work my foundation even through I have interior design background - Not a easy feat to get the right will keep testing improve my skill along the way.

    Didn't know that low ISO is required for interior shoots, definitely after looking through the cameras will ask for guidance here.
    Thanks again guys!
    Not sure others already mentioned about lighting.

    Its v impt to have sufficient lighting. Especially u shoot interior, u will see many times, lighting not enough (unwanted shadows, ceiling lights too dim, sunlight in wrong direction) to capture the finer details.

    And pay attention to the colour of the lighting. Yellow warm or white. Will affect the picture output. U need to know how to get around it.

    So most probably u need additional flashes and lighting. May not need to use every time but will come handy at times.
    Last edited by donut88; 11th April 2016 at 08:15 AM.

  2. #22

    Default Re: Need advice : interiors shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by donut88 View Post
    Not sure others already mentioned about lighting.

    Its v impt to have sufficient lighting. Especially u shoot interior, u will see many times, lighting not enough (unwanted shadows, ceiling lights too dim, sunlight in wrong direction) to capture the finer details.

    And pay attention to the colour of the lighting. Yellow warm or white. Will affect the picture output. U need to know how to get around it.

    So most probably u need additional flashes and lighting. May not need to use every time but will come handy at times.
    Thanks for the advice. Will take note on the lighting as well. Wow, it's just so many things to look at it when start to take phototaking seriously.
    Gotten to start soon once i have select the camera.
    Going to take alot of testing and trying through..

    Note on the ISO as well, my hand quite shaky. haha so i guess i have to get a stand which will useful for my works.

    Cheers guys!
    Last edited by Spark Sue; 11th April 2016 at 11:00 AM.

  3. #23

    Default Re: Need advice : interiors shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by Spark Sue View Post
    Thanks for the advice. Will take note on the lighting as well. Wow, it's just so many things to look at it when start to take phototaking seriously.
    Gotten to start soon once i have select the camera.
    Going to take alot of testing and trying through..

    Note on the ISO as well, my hand quite shaky. haha so i guess i have to get a stand which will useful for my works.

    Cheers guys!
    Choosing APSC camera is in the right direction.The sensor is big enough to minimise noise shooting
    with long/slow shutter speeds.ISO performance is good.You are just starting so don't put pressure on
    yourself.Use window light as a start.Just get a feel of how the photo turns out.Most important is learning about exposure and metering. Camera meter will assume average scene contains mostly middle
    tones and thus meter as 18% grey so whether it's pure black or white it's still a grey tone or colour ( result is grey instead of black or white). For white balance set to AWB (auto white balance) until you are expert enough.

    Here are some articles to inspire and help you...

    Tips for better architectural and interiors photos: May the force be with you..haha.

    http://www.roeosbornphoto.com/tips.html

    http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/41224...ul-home-photos

    http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/99775...-design-photos

    https://fstoppers.com/location/eleve...were-made-5706

    Lighting:

    http://www.popphoto.com/how-to/2013/...interior-photo

    http://www.school-of-digital-photogr...interiors.html

    http://photo-tips-online.com/tip/5-t...h-speedlights/
    Last edited by one eye jack; 12th April 2016 at 12:48 AM.

  4. #24

    Default Re: Need advice : interiors shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by one eye jack View Post
    Choosing APSC camera is in the right direction.The sensor is big enough to minimise noise shooting
    with long/slow shutter speeds.ISO performance is good.You are just starting so don't put pressure on
    yourself.Use window light as a start.Just get a feel of how the photo turns out.Most important is learning about exposure and metering. Camera meter will assume average scene contains mostly middle
    tones and thus meter as 18% grey so whether it's pure black or white it's still a grey tone or colour ( result is grey instead of black or white). For white balance set to AWB (auto white balance) until you are expert enough.

    Here are some articles to inspire and help you...

    Tips for better architectural and interiors photos: May the force be with you..haha.

    Lighting:
    Thanks again for all the tips - definitely will be important for me later when i get my camera.

    Upon looking through the cameras. Here's the following 4 camera i have picked.

    1. EOS 700D (Canon)
    2. D5500 (Nikon)
    3. D5300 (Nikon)
    4. A6000 (Sony)

    As I am taking interior shoots, i feel that I should get camera that's able to tilt the lcd monitor as I need to take as back as possible. I was told that without is possible by going for cable connect (bringing laptop) or wifi (Which bring to A6000 Sony) However I don't really want to bring extra equipment like laptop for photo shooting, I would prefer to see from the lcd monitor even though it will save a few bucks from there.

    Also can I check whether for all the camera that I selected, they are able to use different type of lens right? Not just Canon camera is for canon, sony is for sony, etc. Hope I am right on this or I notice that for Sony - it's only cater for Sony Lens (E-mount type)

    Another question - i manage to talk to my ex-colleague n glad she help me out on this. She did mention that its better to get the body n then a prime len will be better. Should i really do that? She did mention that she did use the kit len - 15-55 but not touching. I was thinking i can start on this len since its cheaper compare to those lens.(wide angle) as i can still able to shoot interiors n causal shooting w my family.

    Also has anyone use aony A6000? I was looking at it n found that the spec is good plus its much lighter compare to the cameras that i have pre-select. The bad thing is that it dont have 360 lcd monitor however the plus point is i can look at it through apps. However does A6000 able to work with other brand lens? I was looking st one canon prime lens wide angle n not sure whether is it able to fit in. Or should i stick w the 1st 3 options?

    Will be testing / handling the cameras within this week if possible. I hope if there anyone who can further advices what to look out for before actual testing so i know what to look out for. (Weight / handing of the camera, etc)

    It will be truly greatful if anyone can help me out on this.

    P.S: Oh ya..she told me that I should get full-frame if possible..but budget wise I couldn't get it.

  5. #25

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    You are able to have live feed from a nikon too.. not sure about canon

  6. #26

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    And yes, sony, canon, nikon each have their own mounts, (e mount / ef/efs / f mount) but ef and f mount can be adapted for e mount too

  7. #27

    Default Re: Need advice : interiors shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by rainduet View Post
    You are able to have live feed from a nikon too.. not sure about canon
    Quote Originally Posted by rainduet View Post
    And yes, sony, canon, nikon each have their own mounts, (e mount / ef/efs / f mount) but ef and f mount can be adapted for e mount too
    Hmm what does live feed mean? Is it using apps kind / wifi / bluetooth that can connect via handphone?

    Ic, so it has their own lens - just thay sony r able to adapts their with additional adaptator?

    Hmmm. I know the model (A6000) i thought of getting r able to wifi it. Which dont required the rotation lcd monitor.
    Thanks for the info. In this case i should se which lens that's able to cater what i need in future.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spark Sue View Post
    Hmm what does live feed mean? Is it using apps kind / wifi / bluetooth that can connect via handphone? Ic, so it has their own lens - just thay sony r able to adapts their with additional adaptator? Hmmm. I know the model (A6000) i thought of getting r able to wifi it. Which dont required the rotation lcd monitor. Thanks for the info. In this case i should se which lens that's able to cater what i need in future.
    yes there's an app (eg Nikon Wireless Mobile Utility) which connects via camera WiFi. Might drain the camera battery. E mount has third party adapters for ef/f mount, such as the metabones speedbooster. Sony doesn't make their own adaptor (except for a mount to e mount)

  9. #29

    Default Re: Need advice : interiors shooting

    I wouldn't rely too much on wifi for viewing the image, viewing on the LCD itself is much faster especially when you need to do critical adjustments like manual focus and small composition adjustments. Sony A6000's tiltable LCD probably will meet most of your needs as most interior shots are taken in landscape orientation.

    You can use adapters to mount non-native lens to the Sony A6000, however you may lose important functionality eg autofocus. Cheaper adapters may also not to be made to strict standards which can cause the mounted lens to tilt affecting the plane of focus eg one side of image sharp but the other side is out of focus.

    I would say all your camera choices with their kit lens can meet your needs for now. Next is looking for a tripod, not just for using low ISO or stability, you will need a tripod for levelling your camera and making small adjustments. The tripod is also useful for taking multiple exposures for blending in software which may help to defer need for flashes / lighting equipment, and help to take panoramas which may help to defer the need for ultra-wide angle lenses.

    A requirement to get full frame? You can check out this thread, many answers
    http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1601842

    Most important is to start somewhere, only then you can know your own requirements and tailor accordingly

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spark Sue View Post

    Hmm what does live feed mean? Is it using apps kind / wifi / bluetooth that can connect via handphone?

    Ic, so it has their own lens - just thay sony r able to adapts their with additional adaptator?

    Hmmm. I know the model (A6000) i thought of getting r able to wifi it. Which dont required the rotation lcd monitor.
    Thanks for the info. In this case i should se which lens that's able to cater what i need in future.
    Sony is good. It has high specs from some top end models of canon or nikon.

    Though I'm a Sony fan, but for your sake, I will tell u to go for canon or Nikon.

    Y? Because my suggestion is u get the body, and start to rent some lenses to try out. And getting canon or Nikon bodies is good idea because they r more popular, and rental of their lenses will be easy.

    Alot of rental business carry wide range of canon and Nikon lenses.

  11. #31
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Need advice : interiors shooting

    keep it simply.

    one camera, one lens, one tripod, one flash, and lot of patient.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  12. #32
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    Default Re: Need advice : interiors shooting

    Regardless of what you choose, remember that the choice is a very personal one. And know that every of your handpicked models can do what you want. (in my opinion) Just a matter of ergonomics (handgrip, button placements, menu friendliness etc) preference only. Lens wise, each of the brands have enough for you too choose from should you decide to go into any specific genre.

    Kit Lens.... I strongly suggest just using the kit lens until you know what you really want to achieve and the kit lens is the limiting factor to achieve that.

    Full Frame (FF). If one does not know the value of a FF, it's as good as another more expensive camera. Also, FF lens are usually more expensive than crop sensor lens.
    Too many great equipments but too little quality photos. [My Flickr] | [My Blog]

  13. #33

    Default Re: Need advice : interiors shooting

    Catchlights and SkyStrike have made good points however let me give my opinions on your camera shortlist.Except for canon D700 which is technologically old in today's terms and at 18Mp. resolution. The two nikon and sony murrorless have similar sensors at 24Mp. AND they don't have OPL (optical low pass filter aka AA filter( anti alias filter).Without this opl over ther sensor it produces sharper photos at the disadvantage of moire patterns but only if you pixel peep and perhaps want to print very big enlargements.Unless your scene has repeating patterns or lots of lines it's not obvious in normal use.

    All 3 have wireless but nikon have GPS which is a feature you are unlikely to use.Nikon have mirrors that flip out of the way when a photo is taken so might have some camera shake effect compared to a6000 mirrorless.It's good to have more pixels because when using wide angle lens the distortion can be corrected by the in-camera if shot in jpeg but for raw format you need to use a lens correction profile in lightroom or photoshop and regarding the sony kitlens 16-50mm ( 24-75mm full frame)
    the raw file is not "pretty" but there are workarounds given the tight budget.Overall sony kitlens
    does produce "good" out of camera jpeg photo if lens correction is activated at the wide angle end.
    Another advantage of more pixels (24mp) is when you use photoshop to correct perspectives ( vertical and horizontal lines) you need to crop and reframe the photo.

    Since this is your first camera you are not bothered by things lke past investments in another brand of camera.Perhaps the most important consideration is that you mention sony is lighter in your hands plus the attractive price.The other good thing is that only a6000 because it is mirrorless and have short camera flange distance with regards to lens mount ( no mirror) you can use other brand lenses with adapters but lose autofocus and perhaps metering capabilty .Vintage lenses can be bought for a song on ebay if you are discerning.Other than that for quality photos lenses by sony and those made under license by Zeiss offer pro performance.Because of this manual lens advantage a6000 has a manual focus assist in that it magnify a portion of the scene to help accurate focussing and a peak focus feature similarly used in video cams where when it is in sharp focus the edges are "highlighted" to indicate correct focus.

    I'm not a fanboy of any brands but just to give you and idea here is a link to sample photos of an ang moh professional working in singapore using sony big brother A7R II full frame 36Mp. of Seletar golf club.
    Last edited by one eye jack; 14th April 2016 at 01:06 PM.

  14. #34

    Default Re: Need advice : interiors shooting

    Just came across this post. Maybe I can throw in an alternative view as someone who makes a living shooting architectural & interior stuff.

    1) Start with a full-frame camera to short-cut the learning process. Sooner or later u will need it. If budget is a contraint, just get a 2nd hand Canon 5D (1st gen) or the older 1Ds2 etc.

    2) Canon or Nikon will do, personally I am on Canon because they have the best tilt-shift lenses out there. But I have seen some great stuffs from Nikon, too.

    3) If you have money for just one lens (assuming u have a tight budget), get a used Sigma 12-24 and u are good to go. The keyword here is: "recti-linear". Yes, u really do need a RL lens. For many years, the 12-24 was my go-to lens until the Canon 11-24 came out recently and it was a game-changer. In future u may wanna invest in TSE17 or 24 when u get to shooting architectural stuff.

    4) Once u have the right tools, learn to use them. Ultrawides are not easy to use, u have to look out for distortions, unnatural angles etc. U mentioned about being an interior designer and that's an advantage, because u can already see from a designer's perspective. For me, I actually took a course in interior design so that when I am in discussions with my clients (architects & designers), we actually know what each other is talking about.

    Good luck on your journey!

  15. #35

    Default Re: Need advice : interiors shooting

    Guys thanks for all the helping information. Really appreciate for all the information I had here.

    1. I guess I will just go for APSC instead for now - I feel that I should just start off with something first than waiting to get a good price on FF cameras.
    2. I am glad that my oldest daughter (4 yrs old) seem to keen on taking photos - perhaps one day I can pass on my APSC to her? haha PLUS this is the reason why I am also looking at light weight camera.
    3. Which is why I am looking at Canon EOS 700D / A6000 / D5500 as they are lighter (I ditch D5300 away as I feel that D5300 is slightly lower compare to D5500? Not sure am I right on this)
    4. Thanks for highlighting the lens which also pay a important part - as mentioned, i think rental tend to have more Canon / Nikon lens compare to Sony?
    5. Ok about the Tilt-Shift lenses..OMG it's cost so much expensive?! Lol I thought those wide angle lens is enough to shot interiors - I guess i need to select my body first before further looking into the lens - I actually eyeing on the Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM based on the review i saw online. Noted on the Sigma 12-24 if I manage to get hold of it or even rent, will tried this out - but first I have to feel the cameras first..
    6. That's it! I guess I definitely need to tried out the actual camera whether does it fit for me. Hope I able to tried all out by tml evening - I only have evening to test since I have some time with my wife..having kids around will definitely distract me..lol. I do hope 313 / orchard side have all 3 brands for me to test it out within a day..lol
    7. Also one last thing - does the camera really need to get those extend warranty? As i actually getting those export one from the local (They will be giving 1 yr in-house warranty) even if i am not getting those, I might be getting 2nd hand ones as well since they are cheaper compare to the actual product. So does it really matter? what the cost like if things really happened after my warranty - will they able to fix for me? what's the cost like if I am getting canon? Anyone know about this?

    Anyway Thanks guys again for all valuable info I got.
    Last edited by Spark Sue; 14th April 2016 at 11:30 PM.

  16. #36
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    Default Re: Need advice : interiors shooting

    Based on your shortlist, I would suggest the Sony A6000+16-50mm kit lens, about $900 new/$600 used and a Sirui or Benro tripod, about $250 new/$150-$200 used. The A6000 has a small built-in flash. This should be enough for a start.

    It can be upgraded in the future with an external flash, e.g. a Nissin i40 (about $300), a better zoom lens Sony Zeiss 16-70mm f4 (new $1200, used $700). With adaptors, you can also use old lenses from almost any brand.

    You can go to a shop or Sony Centre in 313 Somerset and try it out for yourself.

  17. #37

    Default Re: Need advice : interiors shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by ziggy View Post
    Based on your shortlist, I would suggest the Sony A6000+16-50mm kit lens, about $900 new/$600 used and a Sirui or Benro tripod, about $250 new/$150-$200 used. The A6000 has a small built-in flash. This should be enough for a start.

    It can be upgraded in the future with an external flash, e.g. a Nissin i40 (about $300), a better zoom lens Sony Zeiss 16-70mm f4 (new $1200, used $700). With adaptors, you can also use old lenses from almost any brand.

    You can go to a shop or Sony Centre in 313 Somerset and try it out for yourself.
    Thanks on your advice and mentioned that there's a shop @ 313 area. Will give a try later evening when off work. Thks!

  18. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spark Sue View Post

    Thanks on your advice and mentioned that there's a shop @ 313 area. Will give a try later evening when off work. Thks!
    No need 313.

    Funan has Sony shop and many other cam shops to see wide range of brands.

    And yes, rental will have good range of canon and Nikon lenses, more than Sony, due to bigger market of canon and Nikon users
    Last edited by donut88; 15th April 2016 at 09:30 AM.

  19. #39

    Default Re: Need advice : interiors shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by donut88 View Post
    No need 313.

    Funan has Sony shop and many other cam shops to see wide range of brands.

    And yes, rental will have good range of canon and Nikon lenses, more than Sony, due to bigger market of canon and Nikon users
    I thought funan has close down? As in renovation - my wife told me to go there as well.if it's still open today we r might be gg there instead. Will check online again.

    After Checking : Sorry my bad, it's still open... In this case will be heading there instead. Thanks!
    Last edited by Spark Sue; 15th April 2016 at 10:04 AM.

  20. #40
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    Default Re: Need advice : interiors shooting

    Just to offer my views:

    1. I agreed with astroboy that a rectilinear ultra wide lens is important. You want to get the lines as straight as possible (without barrel/pincushion distortion). Some of the kit lens, like the Sony 16-50, has too much distortion (although it is corrected by the camera), and 16mm may still be not wide enough (for living room, big hall etc).

    2. When come to lighting, there is a lot more knowledge to pick up. built-in flash is not useful at all. Power is too low to lit up the space. You will need external flash for the power and off-camera mounting (mount externally on a light stand). You may also need softbox to diffuse the light.
    Last edited by Eng Hoe; 16th April 2016 at 12:04 AM.

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