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Thread: Winter Footwear

  1. #41
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    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    add thermal insulation oso, boots for cold climate will hav 2 hav tis.

  2. #42

    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    Quote Originally Posted by eric69
    haha... yeah, those who being to cold countries before would know! And I have heard of my friends, before their maidien winter trips, on wanting to bring their whole DSLR gears, with tripods and stuffs ...
    Care to share the experiences of ur friends who thought of lugging all their DSLR stuff to winter countries? Was it difficult or something not advisable?

  3. #43

    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    Quote Originally Posted by doug3fflux
    .......but if u finally decide on getting the goosedown, do buy the green spray bottle, timberland's waterproofing coating. it helps on retarding..
    douglas,
    Would the water-retarding spary work on non-waterproff leather?? or any fabric leather for that matter. If it does, like that save alot of money loh! Just buy spray and any shoe wld become waterproof!

  4. #44
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    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    any1 used such spray b4? betta safe then sorry, if d waterproof layer peel off at d wrong time how?

    dun splurg, but oso betta dun scrooge ah. if it does not work as u imagined, u suffer. no1 pay $$ for holiday 2 suffer a sORe, frost bitten feet rite?

  5. #45
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    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    Quote Originally Posted by exhibitj
    douglas,
    Would the water-retarding spary work on non-waterproff leather?? or any fabric leather for that matter. If it does, like that save alot of money loh! Just buy spray and any shoe wld become waterproof!
    all the do's and don'ts of using the spray are written all over the bottle. it doesnt come cheap..though i cant remember its price offhand...

    and no, this isnt the way to waterproof..if not people will be buying like crazy liao..mo mo....you might as well wax your shoe..haha. make a trip down to Timberland at marina square and check out the spray...

    Douglas

  6. #46

    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    I went to Hokkaido early this year for the ice festival. The temperature was -10degC easily. A good hiking shoes is important. But advice to all maidian winter travellers, is depending on the winter temperature, one wool termal sock is usually sufficient, but I have friends who wore two layers but still feel cold.

    But the problem is, thermal socks are very thick, that means you have to buy a bigger size (1/2 size more). And after the trip, the hiking shoes would be too big to wear with normal cotton socks (imagine Ronald McDonald)!

    A good grip hiking shoes is good for walking on rough terrains. But if wore in Singapore, hiking shoes can be disastous on flat ceramic floors (especially wer toilet floors which can be extremely slippery).
    Last edited by Pegasus; 5th November 2005 at 10:31 AM.

  7. #47

    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    yeah, probably... I just know for a fact that my Montrail w/ Vibram shoe is low on grip...

    Quote Originally Posted by doug3fflux
    .....
    .....
    vibram cannot grip on wet ground? i must say its not just the outsole itself that accounts for its grip leh..Vibram is integrated into many shoe systems...from multipurpose crosstrail shoes to hardcore mountaineering boots to standard sandals...

  8. #48

    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    Not really, good quality thermal socks need not be very thick... just more expensive


    Quote Originally Posted by Pegasus
    I went to Hokkaido early this year for the ice festival. The temperature was -10degC easily. A good hiking shoes is important. But advice to all maidian winter travellers, is depending on the winter temperature, one wool termal sock is usually sufficient, but I have friends who wore two layers but still feel cold.

    But the problem is, thermal socks are very thick, that means you have to buy a bigger size (1/2 size more). And after the trip, the hiking shoes would be too big to wear with normal cotton socks (imagine Ronald McDonald)!

    A good grip hiking shoes is good for walking on rough terrains. But if wore in Singapore, hiking shoes can be disastous on flat ceramic floors (especially wer toilet floors which can be extremely slippery).

  9. #49

    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    From the looks of it, a proper winter/waterproof shoe is essential.

    I was looking at Dr. Martens boots. It is stated anti-slip, anti-oil, anti-etc, all except anti-water (waterproof). Does anti-oil mean waterproof too?

    Really hard to find waterproof shoes/ankle-cut boots that look formal instead of the ruggedness of the usual waterproof hiking shoes.
    Anyone have suggestions?

  10. #50
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    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    Quote Originally Posted by exhibitj
    From the looks of it, a proper winter/waterproof shoe is essential.

    I was looking at Dr. Martens boots. It is stated anti-slip, anti-oil, anti-etc, all except anti-water (waterproof). Does anti-oil mean waterproof too?

    Really hard to find waterproof shoes/ankle-cut boots that look formal instead of the ruggedness of the usual waterproof hiking shoes.
    Anyone have suggestions?
    Hi, the "anti-slip", "anti-oil" etc is referring to the soles' ability to resist degradation due to the contact with oil and stuffs. Waterproofing of the shoes is more than that. It involves good sealing seams, impermable soles, fabres etc. Incidently, I just bought a pair of "Columbia" hiking shoes today at WOS. They're having 30% discount (if WOS member, can get an addition 10% discount ~40%), and the hiking shoes come to to abit more than $100. You may like to consider "Columbia"'s shoes. Alternatively, Timberland have some great looking causal boots (that's waterproof too) as well but the price can be steep.
    Last edited by eric69; 5th November 2005 at 10:41 PM.

  11. #51
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    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    Quote Originally Posted by eric69
    come to to abit more than $100. You may like to consider "Columbia"'s shoes. Alternatively, Timberland have some great looking causal boots (that's waterproof too) as well but the price can be steep.
    here;s an example of brands with reputable quality and they state its waterproof, with the label, but it doesnt have to be goretex or vibram....its impt not to be brand conscious, but rather, functionality/shoe structure conscious.

    i have columbia trailmeister; columbia's omni grip is suitable for daily use and normal day hikes...the trail meister is a very comfortable, day walking shoe...haha..

    Douglas

  12. #52
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    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    Quote Originally Posted by exhibitj
    From the looks of it, a proper winter/waterproof shoe is essential.

    I was looking at Dr. Martens boots. It is stated anti-slip, anti-oil, anti-etc, all except anti-water (waterproof). Does anti-oil mean waterproof too?

    Really hard to find waterproof shoes/ankle-cut boots that look formal instead of the ruggedness of the usual waterproof hiking shoes.
    Anyone have suggestions?
    oh and i believe Dr.marten's shoes are more like industrial boots. thats why they have oil-corrosion resistance etc etc...steel toe etc. wow. those scare me. imagine. steel toe. meant for stuff like dropping bricks/steel bars on ur foot, no problem......

  13. #53
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    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    Quote Originally Posted by eric69
    Hi, the "anti-slip", "anti-oil" etc is referring to the soles' ability to resist degradation due to the contact with oil and stuffs. Waterproofing of the shoes is more than that. It involves good sealing seams, impermable soles, fabres etc. Incidently, I just bought a pair of "Columbia" hiking shoes today at WOS. They're having 30% discount (if WOS member, can get an addition 10% discount ~40%), and the hiking shoes come to to abit more than $100. You may like to consider "Columbia"'s shoes. Alternatively, Timberland have some great looking causal boots (that's waterproof too) as well but the price can be steep.
    i must b getting old, Columbia oso a brand, i 4got.

    Note- it carries a lower budget range, other then their usually better & pricier range.

  14. #54

    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    Guess i shld be looking at Columbia's range then.
    Quite affordable compared to timberland...
    Hi Tec also not bad...

  15. #55
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    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    Quote Originally Posted by doug3fflux
    oh and i believe Dr.marten's shoes are more like industrial boots. thats why they have oil-corrosion resistance etc etc...steel toe etc. wow. those scare me. imagine. steel toe. meant for stuff like dropping bricks/steel bars on ur foot, no problem......
    Talking about boots with "steel toe", I was told that these shoes will set off the metal detectors at airports ie "airport unfriendly shoes". "DeWalts" brand or something like that, some if its models have metal parts. I once encountered at the airport, one guy got to remove his shoes before he can go into the departure hall.
    Last edited by eric69; 6th November 2005 at 02:35 PM.

  16. #56
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    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    Quote Originally Posted by doug3fflux


    here;s an example of brands with reputable quality and they state its waterproof, with the label, but it doesnt have to be goretex or vibram....its impt not to be brand conscious, but rather, functionality/shoe structure conscious.

    i have columbia trailmeister; columbia's omni grip is suitable for daily use and normal day hikes...the trail meister is a very comfortable, day walking shoe...haha..

    Douglas
    Agreed to that. Actually, Vibram is basically "Carbon Rubber" as its base material. Grip factor is dependent on two parameters (a) materials and (b) sole design. The former parameter is not an issue. It's the latter that will influence the gripping power. GORE-Tex" is also another brand that's cater more to the brand-concious traveller. But basically it's just another membrane-technology materials.

    Incidently, I still think that the SAF boots are still the best hiking shoes. Water-proof, good grip etc (bomb-proof somemore!) But does anyone dare to alknowledge that, and wear these boots for their overseas personal trips? i doubt so.

  17. #57
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    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    Quote Originally Posted by eric69
    Talking about boots with "steel toe", I was told that these shoes will set off the metal detectors at airports ie "airport unfriendly shoes". "DeWalts" brand or something like that, some if its models have metal parts. I once encountered at the airport, one guy got to remove his shoes before he can go into the departure hall.
    Same thing happen to me at Changi Airport when i wore my Columbia hiking boots to Switzerland.

  18. #58
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    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    yes hitec is very affordable and for its build, LIGHT!!!! that is a huge plus...
    its true, the sole grip design almsot directly affects how it grips..some 'catch' mud very easily.

    OT to sandals: i love my pair of Source.



    Douglas

  19. #59
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    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    hi all, here's a weblink 4 tips on such stuff!

    http://www.greatoutdoors.com

  20. #60

    Default Re: Winter Footwear

    Quote Originally Posted by Pegasus
    But the problem is, thermal socks are very thick, that means you have to buy a bigger size (1/2 size more). And after the trip, the hiking shoes would be too big to wear with normal cotton socks (imagine Ronald McDonald)!
    You will need bigger size trekking shoes for hiking, anyway. So that's not an issue.

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