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Thread: help a newbie here! i've enquiry....

  1. #1

    Default help a newbie here! i've enquiry....

    see this pic here:

    http://www2.photosig.com/photos/50/8...0d3327dea8.jpg

    if u can see, there is a photographer standing there looking at the bridge.. he is focus, but other people are having those 'motion blur'... how to create such effect?

  2. #2
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    newbie also... guess it's long expose time, the photographer just stand still where people behind were walking on that moment??

  3. #3

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    Originally posted by chenwei
    newbie also... guess it's long expose time, the photographer just stand still where people behind were walking on that moment??
    then what is the diff between a long expose time and long shutter time? i'm confused by such terms.. haha.. hello? knock knock where is the glossary?

  4. #4

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    Originally posted by behyx


    then what is the diff between a long expose time and long shutter time? i'm confused by such terms.. haha.. hello? knock knock where is the glossary?
    Same, same!!!
    To get a long exposure, you need to have the shutter opened for the whole duration of that exposure... so the slower shutter speed (i.e. long shutter opening time).
    Example, the photo below is with a long exposure or slow shutter speed of 20 seconds.

    Last edited by SzennyBoy; 26th October 2002 at 02:54 AM.

  5. #5

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    The shot was probably taken at about ~1/15 shutter speed. That's how moving subjects are [i]only slightly[/o] blurred while relatively static ones are sharp.

  6. #6
    Verre Vrai
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    Szennyboy and Zerstorer, you forgot to mention TRIPOD for long shutter shots. As a rule of thumb, if you choose a shutter speed of the reciprocal of your lens focal length (1/f) , you need a tripod.


    $0.02

  7. #7

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    Originally posted by SzennyBoy


    Same, same!!!
    To get a long exposure, you need to have the shutter opened for the whole duration of that exposure... so the slower shutter speed (i.e. long shutter opening time).
    Example, the photo below is with a long exposure or slow shutter speed of 20 seconds.
    oh!! ok thanks

    Verre Vrai, can you explain about what is "shutter speed of the reciprocal of your lens focal length (1/f)"?

    and Zerstorer, you mean at certain shutter speed, static objects can get blur?

  8. #8
    Midnight
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    Originally posted by Verre Vrai
    As a rule of thumb, if you choose a shutter speed of the reciprocal of your lens focal length (1/f) , you need a tripod.
    Do note also that this rule of thumb refers to the 35mm equivalent focal length, which is usually different from the actual focal length of digicam lenses. It's always better to give yourself one extra stop of latitude too, if you have sufficient light to do so.

  9. #9
    Midnight
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    Originally posted by behyx
    and Zerstorer, you mean at certain shutter speed, static objects can get blur?
    The idea is that if you're using a 35mm-equivalent focal length of, say, 50mm, then as a general rule of thumb you should not handhold shots with shutter speeds slower than 1/50s. Similarly, if your 35mm-equivalent focal length is 105mm, then you should not handhold shots slower than 1/105s (or whichever next faster number is available, eg. 1/125s).

    Note that I used the term '35mm-equivalent'. This is because in the case of most digital cameras, the actual physical lens focal lengths tend to be much shorter than the 'equivalent' 35mm lens that produces a similar field of view.

  10. #10

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    Originally posted by Midnight
    The idea is that if you're using a 35mm-equivalent focal length of, say, 50mm, then as a general rule of thumb you should not handhold shots with shutter speeds slower than 1/50s. Similarly, if your 35mm-equivalent focal length is 105mm, then you should not handhold shots slower than 1/105s (or whichever next faster number is available, eg. 1/125s).

    Note that I used the term '35mm-equivalent'. This is because in the case of most digital cameras, the actual physical lens focal lengths tend to be much shorter than the 'equivalent' 35mm lens that produces a similar field of view.
    i seeee!!

    so how about film SLR? it's purely 35mm rite?

    as a newbie, how to check the focal length?

  11. #11
    Midnight
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    Originally posted by behyx
    so how about film SLR? it's purely 35mm rite?
    Well, if you're using a 35mm film camera, then of course. If you're using SLR cameras for APS, medium format, large format, etc etc, then it's a different ball game....

    as a newbie, how to check the focal length?
    You mean for 35mm SLR zoom lenses? Just refer to the focal length markings on the lens itself (you'll have to estimate a little if it's in between the markings). If you're using a prime lens, then there's no problem at all.

    Otherwise, if you're referring to digital cameras, it kinda varies from camera to camera and brand to brand, so you'll have to check your manual for that. The manual will also usually state the corresponding 35mm focal lengths for the camera's zoom range, so you can figure out the conversion factor from there.

  12. #12

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    Originally posted by Midnight
    Well, if you're using a 35mm film camera, then of course. If you're using SLR cameras for APS, medium format, large format, etc etc, then it's a different ball game....

    You mean for 35mm SLR zoom lenses? Just refer to the focal length markings on the lens itself (you'll have to estimate a little if it's in between the markings). If you're using a prime lens, then there's no problem at all.

    Otherwise, if you're referring to digital cameras, it kinda varies from camera to camera and brand to brand, so you'll have to check your manual for that. The manual will also usually state the corresponding 35mm focal lengths for the camera's zoom range, so you can figure out the conversion factor from there.
    oh so that is the focal lenght.. i see.. i always put it under the green color one.. haha..

  13. #13
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    Slow shutter speed will cause moving object to be blur, static objects will still remain clear. You can check your focal length of your lens, it is normally written at the front part of your lens...

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