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Thread: How to use Exposure Setting?

  1. #1

    Default How to use Exposure Setting?

    Hi,

    I am using a Olympus C200Zoom and this camera come with exposure adjustment setting: -2, -1.5, -1, -0.5, 0 (default), +0.5 to +2.

    I understand from the manual that this setting is used to when the exposure is *not normal*. I had tried a few time but the result i get from my camera is very inconsistant. I think it must be my lack of experience.

    So can someone enlighten me on:

    1. When to use each setting? (Eg: I use +0.5 in daylight flo light at night seem to improve -brighten- the picture) When to use -2, -1.5 etc

    2. Is the + and - setting has the same effect on different camera? Or I have to test it on the next dig camera I bought to see its effect?

    3. How does this adjustment of setting compare to doing it in Photoshop?

    4. Sometime it is diffect to judge if the picture is overexposed in the LCD display, but only realised that after downloading to PC. So is it wise just to leave it to default (0) setting as far as possible to be on the safe side (and later adjust in Photoshiop)?

    Thanks for sharing.

  2. #2

  3. #3
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    Default Re: How to use Exposure Setting?

    Originally posted by Whitesand
    Hi,

    I am using a Olympus C200Zoom and this camera come with exposure adjustment setting: -2, -1.5, -1, -0.5, 0 (default), +0.5 to +2.

    I understand from the manual that this setting is used to when the exposure is *not normal*. I had tried a few time but the result i get from my camera is very inconsistant. I think it must be my lack of experience.

    So can someone enlighten me on:

    1. When to use each setting? (Eg: I use +0.5 in daylight flo light at night seem to improve -brighten- the picture) When to use -2, -1.5 etc

    2. Is the + and - setting has the same effect on different camera? Or I have to test it on the next dig camera I bought to see its effect?

    3. How does this adjustment of setting compare to doing it in Photoshop?

    4. Sometime it is diffect to judge if the picture is overexposed in the LCD display, but only realised that after downloading to PC. So is it wise just to leave it to default (0) setting as far as possible to be on the safe side (and later adjust in Photoshiop)?

    Thanks for sharing.
    Let me try to answer a couple (and if i am wrong, feel free to correct me)

    Question 1:

    When to use. Well, it's largely up to yourself and the effect you want to create. For starting out, maybe you would like to have it set @ 0 first (you are using A mode or S mode?) and since it is a DC, experiment around abit by taking the same picture but with diff exposure readings (bracketing) and see how it turns out.

    Question 2:

    Olympus (like my previous C700Uz) has this system of +/- 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 etc etc but other makers of DCs have not gotten round to standardizing it yet. For th S602, it uses a "ruler" where you adjust the settings towards + or - accordingly.

    Question 3 & 4:

    Well, it is always better to get things right the first time round (though it might take some practise). Different situation would require different settings and hence the key here is to experiment. Like you mentioned before, in a bright place, you may want to underexpose the shot (-0.5 or -1.0) to avoid over exposure. (You still follow?)

    Well, this is just a rough guide i guess. Hope this helps.
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  4. #4
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    Default

    when you're using the camera in non-manual mode, the camera will try to adjust the settings for aperture, shutter speed and sometimes the ISO to produce a pic that's not too bright or too dark ("18% gray"). However, there're cases when it might be tricked.

    E.g., if you're taking pics of snow, the camera will adjust the settings to make the entire pic less bright. This could cause the white snow to become grayish. To overcome this, you would need to increase exposure so that snow is white.

    The reverse is true. e.g. if you have a black subject (e.g. black cat), to make sure that the subject remains black (and not lighter colored), you need to reduce the exposure to ensure that it remains black.

    Exposure compensation can also be used to create other interesting effects.
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

  5. #5

    Default

    Actually it's used more often to correct problems with exposure due to the camera being unable to gauge the scene properly.

    You just have to adjust according to your taste and experience. When in doubt just bracket and review the results later.

  6. #6

    Default Re: How to use Exposure Setting?

    Originally posted by Whitesand
    3. How does this adjustment of setting compare to doing it in Photoshop?
    This setting attempts to capture a correct exposure. By fine-tuning the exposure setting that the camera is set to.

    There are certain things that photoshop can't correct...for example blown to white highlights(due to overexposure). Also using photoshop to correct underexposed shots typically lead to a increase in noise and grain as well.

  7. #7
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    Default

    Originally posted by Zerstorer
    When in doubt just bracket and review the results later.
    Hmm.. how much bracketing do u normally do?? 5 shots in +/- 0.5 steps? I usually wonder if doing 3 shots in +/- 0.3 steps will be enough..

  8. #8

    Default

    Thanks all for sharing. Keep comming

    I know that I got to experiment with the camera to know more, just that I thought if someone had experienced maybe can give some pointer (Eg: my DC indoor +0.5 will yield better result than default) so that I can take not and shorten the learning curve.

    On bracketing: pls advice how wide the bracket should be, or should practically be? I think if you are taking some kind of still object, it can be done easily. How about those life/moving scene that does not allow taking multiple shots but to decide the need to adjust exposure before hand?

  9. #9
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    Default

    Originally posted by Whitesand

    I know that I got to experiment with the camera to know more, just that I thought if someone had experienced maybe can give some pointer (Eg: my DC indoor +0.5 will yield better result than default) so that I can take not and shorten the learning curve.
    Ah well, ok. Maybe this would help. DCs are inherently different and when you mean indoor, what kind of lighting condition are you talking about? Even ifit's natural light, having white walls might affect the amount of light reflected and such, so you see, there is a whole load of variables. We would like to help but there is no straight cut answers.

    The key is honestly, to try.

    Originally posted by Whitesand

    On bracketing: pls advice how wide the bracket should be, or should practically be? I think if you are taking some kind of still object, it can be done easily. How about those life/moving scene that does not allow taking multiple shots but to decide the need to adjust exposure before hand?
    Ah, if it's only meant for a moving object and cannot be capture later, then i sugges setting it to 0. Safe bet. Bracketing, well, i used to take anything between -1.0 to 1.0

    Good luck!
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  10. #10

    Default

    Originally posted by stk


    Hmm.. how much bracketing do u normally do?? 5 shots in +/- 0.5 steps? I usually wonder if doing 3 shots in +/- 0.3 steps will be enough..
    It depends on the lighting conditions, just set a wider range if you think the metering is going to be fooled. I normally just set +/- 0.3 if any. Would try to attempt to meter the scene correctly for a start.
    Last edited by Zerstorer; 25th October 2002 at 09:44 AM.

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