View Poll Results: What makes a good Portraiture Shot?

Voters
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  • Beautiful/Handsome Model (Female/Male)

    32 27.12%
  • Great lighting

    61 51.69%
  • Distraction free background

    33 27.97%
  • Catch-light in the model's eye

    43 36.44%
  • Poses

    50 42.37%
  • Great Camera (Name your own pref if you deem this to be a factor)

    3 2.54%
  • Having loads of PA to help you witht e reflectors

    5 4.24%
  • Male Model must be buffed or Female model must have "assets"

    10 8.47%
  • It doesn't matter. It's how you bring out the best of which ever subject you're taking

    66 55.93%
  • I don't do portraiture shots

    8 6.78%
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Thread: What makes a good portraiture shot?

  1. #1
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    Default What makes a good portraiture shot?

    As above. Feel free to post your views!
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  2. #2
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    I feel that making the subject feel at ease and capture the natural moment will be best.

  3. #3
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    Sometimes, even though unflattering, I think a portrait of an "ugly" person is more interesting than picture perfect ones, maybe since they might have more character. It's how the picture of the person is able to bring out the emotions in you.

  4. #4

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    If you use a real chiobu model, viewers might be more forgiving about the photographic mistakes. I agree with the previous post on ugly models too. Also look for faces that are strong. Like a good strong chin, nice big eyes, high cheekbones. Old people make good models too because of their wrinkles.

  5. #5

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    Originally posted by maddog
    If you use a real chiobu model, viewers might be more forgiving about the photographic mistakes. I agree with the previous post on ugly models too. Also look for faces that are strong. Like a good strong chin, nice big eyes, high cheekbones. Old people make good models too because of their wrinkles.
    Uh, how does that improve your photography?

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by Richard


    Uh, how does that improve your photography?
    Well said.

    Our clients sometimes may not have the kind of dream look that we have in mind, but business is business, still have to perform our best for the result.
    Last edited by Digipix; 21st October 2002 at 03:38 PM.

  7. #7

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    Originally posted by Richard


    Uh, how does that improve your photography?
    Probably won't. I've been looking through lotsa books on portraiture. They always use 'good' models. So I think what makes a good shot has got less to do with how well you take it.

  8. #8

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    That of course depends on what you're shooting for. If you're shooting professionally, of course what the customer wants takes place over what you intend to shoot. However, if taken in the context of trying to improve your photography...

  9. #9

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    Being a newbie in slide photography, I noticed my shots taken with slide tend to be better. So I think two big factors in a good shot is good subject and good camera/medium.

  10. #10
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    I think make-up plays a part too. You can see those miracle works in studio photography especially those wedding ones.
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  11. #11
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    poses, poses, poses.......
    lighting, lightings, lightings.......
    pay close attention to these things,,,,,,,,VERY IMPORTANT !!!!


    ????????WHAT IS POTRAIT IS ALL ABOUT ???????????

  12. #12

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    sorry, nothing above, i think a good portraiture, the most important element to to capture the real x-factor of the sitter. As per said, it can be an ugly person, but if you can bring out the 'glow' in the person, the instant the picture can connect to the viewer, that will make a good shot. Everyone can shoot a professional model, but if you can bring out more from the person, his/her wacky side etc that will make the shot a winner.

    as a portaiture photographer, we must know how to connect to the person, to ease them and talk them out to portray their natural side and to try and whip each a personal element from them.

  13. #13

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    I think portraiture photography is very difficult.

    Some ideas have been floated on how to make a good portrait - "good models - whether they be young and attractive or old people with wrinkles", "what the customer wants", "makeup", "poses, lighting"

    The problem is that the concept of a "good portrait" is as diverse as the number of photographers in this forum. There are varieties of portraiture. For example, fashion portraits, glamour portraits, family portraits, "mug-shot" portraits, etc The criteria for each of these genres differ considerably. For example, fashion and glamour portraits are essentially "superficial". The models acting and posing, with appropriate make-up and lighting, to convey a sense of the "star", or the "ultimate' or to sell a product. On the other hand a portrait of your young toddler is very different, trying to capture the very fleeting innocence/joy/pain of youth and growth.

    So unless one clarify what genre of portraiture one is talking about, it is hard to say what constitute "good portraiture".

    Having said all that: I will quote a statement from a well known photographer (got this from a friend).

    "A good portrait is where there is no artifice. The photographer stripped of his ego, pride and pretense. The sitter stripped of superficial desire to please. The sitter being himself/herself. With this understanding that the other is not out to take advantage of the other for self gain and promotion, there is no space/distance between the photographer and the photographed" (my paraphrase/adaptation)

  14. #14

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    wow real deep.
    I think the first challenge is to be able to communicate to the model how you want the pose, look, feel. Not using experienced models,where they more or less can pose themselves.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Belle&Sebastain
    sorry, nothing above, i think a good portraiture, the most important element to to capture the real x-factor of the sitter. As per said, it can be an ugly person, but if you can bring out the 'glow' in the person, the instant the picture can connect to the viewer, that will make a good shot. Everyone can shoot a professional model, but if you can bring out more from the person, his/her wacky side etc that will make the shot a winner.

    as a portaiture photographer, we must know how to connect to the person, to ease them and talk them out to portray their natural side and to try and whip each a personal element from them.
    Agree. Do not have much to add, just two quotes I read from somewhere:

    "Much more than a flattering likeness,
    true portraiture speaks of the person within"

    "Photographing people has little to do with photography. It's to do with personality, control, entertainment, being personable, people liking you."

  16. #16
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    I opt for model's expression.....

    Natural and unintentionally...probably the best protrait shot is just candid shot? keke

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