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Thread: what it takes to be a web designer

  1. #1
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    Default what it takes to be a web designer

    a survey by biz trends in this month's cleo mag shows that a web designer with 1-2 yrs experience and a degree can draw a salary of about $2500 - $3000.

    how real is that?

    aside from the usual stuff like macromedia, html, java script and photoshop, what else does a web designer need to know?



    i mean is the primary scope to do with designing layouts or does web designing also include stuff like database mgmt and those techie shite?


    and, do web designers with degrees draw higher salaries than those with diplomas?
    Last edited by wildhoney; 20th October 2002 at 10:38 PM.

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    Default Re: what it takes to be a web designer

    Originally posted by wildhoney
    a survey by biz trends in this month's cleo mag shows that a web designer with 1-2 yrs experience and a degree can draw a salary of about $2500 - $3000.

    how real is that?

    aside from the usual stuff like macromedia, html, java script and photoshop, what else does a web designer need to know?

    i mean is the primary scope to do with designing layouts or does web designing also include stuff like database mgmt and those techie shite?

    and, do web designers with degrees draw higher salaries than those with diplomas?
    Depends on the company. Web designers design, the techie shite like connecting to a database, etc are done by web developers (of which I am one of them).

    Depending on the company again, designers either do everything right down to the HTML, or they will design in PhotoShop, slice the graphics, and pass to the web developers to code the HTMLs and JavaScript. In other companies, designers may also do the HTML coding in things like DreamWeaver.

    Regards
    CK

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    how's the pay like in yours? (web designer's)


    and, very importantly, do web designers have to do OT? or bring back wrok from the office to do after office hours, on weekends?

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    Originally posted by wildhoney
    how's the pay like in yours? (web designer's)


    and, very importantly, do web designers have to do OT? or bring back wrok from the office to do after office hours, on weekends?
    I don't know their pay (it's confidential). Back in the dot com hey days, we all used to do OT. Average of 14hours or so a day. But not anymore. Most people leave on time now.

    Regards
    CK

  5. #5

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    The culture of the company will decide whether you have to work OT often or not... Mine for example is a norm to work late...

    These days, the market is quite bad and Fresh Diploma holders now ask for $1500 - $1800.
    Grads tend to ask slightly higher but they don't have the practical experience & application knowledge the diploma students are put through, so I'm more inclined to hire the diploma holders. Some uni grads have even to start with the same salary as the diploma holders.

    Unless degree holders can impress me with their skills, thought/logical process & potential managerial capabilities, I will consider them.

    Other companies of course, will differ...
    Btw, I am still hiring... anybody keen??

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    In this field, having a diploma or a degree would not differ much. What would matter most would be the portfolio that you would have to present to the potential employer for him to gauge your worth. As a BA and dip holder I find that this is the general trend. One might hold a degree but he might just as well produce crap work while a dip holder could be really creative in his/her thought process.

    As a web designer, the job scope is generally to take care of the design, layout, basic coding. Information would already be provided, hence the designer would have to decide on content format, method of presenting that information (by flash, shockwave etc), layout and design (including theme and general style). Most of the time the coding would be done by him as well. While this might seem like an easy task in Dreamweaver, there are many complex issues involved in fine tuning of the coding process.

    There are quite a few issues to take notice of, some important ones would be file size, download time, colour depth, file naming conventions and cross-platforming (IE and Netscape). When there are complex table formats, the cross platforming issues really create a headache.

    This would be the basic job of a web designer. Basic knowledge of forms, javascript would usually be helpful. Flash and Shockwave programming knowledge is critical, as these vector based media can create really fantastic presentations in a really small amount of space.

    Knowledge of other skills like video and sound editing, 3D modelling and animation, would only value add to your worth as a web designer.

    Salary wise, the market is not too good now with an abundance of freshies from the polys, but as a dip holder you could be looking at something like S$1.4-1.8k as starting and BA holders $1.8-2.2 starting pay. Again, it will also all depend on the portfolio. There is a very big freelance market out there if you look carefully, but then again, as with many other industries, there are also many students willing to do it at a much reduced rate


    PM me if you wish to find out anything more.

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    Oh yes, as for bringing home work, the design industry is mostly based on project basis, that means, you are handed a project, finish it within that time frame by all means, irregardless of whether you do it during working hours or your own time at home/in office. Clients are not going to accept explanations like "Oh sorry I couldn't finish it on time because my office closes at 5 etc."

    Project deadlines are always high stress times, usually losing sleep, sometimes for days in a row Can get really cranky at times....

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    Originally posted by Minimalis
    As a web designer, the job scope is generally to take care of the design, layout, basic coding. Information would already be provided, hence the designer would have to decide on content format, method of presenting that information (by flash, shockwave etc), layout and design (including theme and general style). Most of the time the coding would be done by him as well. While this might seem like an easy task in Dreamweaver, there are many complex issues involved in fine tuning of the coding process.

    There are quite a few issues to take notice of, some important ones would be file size, download time, colour depth, file naming conventions and cross-platforming (IE and Netscape). When there are complex table formats, the cross platforming issues really create a headache.

    This would be the basic job of a web designer. Basic knowledge of forms, javascript would usually be helpful. Flash and Shockwave programming knowledge is critical, as these vector based media can create really fantastic presentations in a really small amount of space.

    Wah, and to think I have to do all those cross-platform things, javascripts, CSS, etc as a web developer. Our designers must have it lucky. I am now so used to complex tables and coding them by hand. And I know what works and what doesn't, and the result usually works on all browsers.



    Regards
    CK

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    It also depends on the company. If the company's a small setup then the webbie has to do most of the things. If it is a big one with designers, programmers, then naturally the workload gets even out. If I were to do everything I guess I would expect more money, but then again the web market is so bad these days. I have an acquaintance who was originally working with 4 other designers in her company. They fired the 4 to cut costs and piled their workload onto her. Drove her so mad that she quit eventually.

    Knowledge of the extra stuff would make youself more value added, hence higher chances of securing that job.

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    In this field, having a diploma or a degree would not differ much.
    +

    as for bringing home work, the design industry is mostly based on project basis, that means, you are handed a project, finish it within that time frame by all means, irregardless of whether you do it during working hours or your own time at home/in office



    right........which is why i'm pretty hesitant about this line of work.


    But one last thing,


    My dream would be to do my Masters in Communication Studies at NTU. My current line of work would allow me to do just an MBA and not the other cos a Masters in Comm studies requires relevant working experience in the media line.

    Are web designers considered to be working in the media industry?
    I mean, after all the Web is a form of media.

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    Originally posted by wildhoney
    My dream would be to do my Masters in Communication Studies at NTU. My current line of work would allow me to do just an MBA and not the other cos a Masters in Comm studies requires relevant working experience in the media line.

    Are web designers considered to be working in the media industry?
    I mean, after all the Web is a form of media. [/B]
    Can't really answer you on that one as I am not too certain myself. But from what I gather I would think that media would equate to journalism, film, radio.. the hardcore mainstays of the trade. You have a point in saying that web is a media (multimedia/electronic media) but guess there's a grey area regarding that with reference to media line. I know a web journalist who works for CNA and I guess that would be rather clear-cut, but for someone who just designs and codes pages...

    Anyway, interesting site you have there esp the cherry popper bit...

    Cheers!

  12. #12
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    Originally posted by wildhoney

    My dream would be to do my Masters in Communication Studies at NTU. My current line of work would allow me to do just an MBA and not the other cos a Masters in Comm studies requires relevant working experience in the media line.

    Are web designers considered to be working in the media industry?
    I mean, after all the Web is a form of media.

    Am not too sure about the requirement for the course you mentioned. Here's my take on it (for your info, I graduated from their bachelor course):

    There's no really defined industry you have to be in. It's not MUST be MEDIA line as you've stated. The curriculum is focused on communication, and that includes stuff like corporate communication, public relation, business communication, etc etc. So if you're working in a manufacturing company but are doing things like marketing, PR, etc, I would consider that relevant work.

    Web designers? Some might consider it yes, some might not. Fact is "Web Designer" is a term bandied around so much, it doesn't mean a shite for use as defining a job scope/what you do. It's just like terms like Public Relations Officer and Executive, if you get my meaning. What your job scope/ experience are will be more important. I've known Web designers who come from Arts background (designs), Computer Science background (tech work), and even communications background (who talks and conceptualise and plan but neither layout or code).

    You mention that your work will allow you to do MBA. Well, if there's any component of "communications" i your line, then I'd say relevant experience is present. It's really highly dependent on how you rationalise whether the coursework will help in your line of work...

    Hope that helps (and did not confuse too much).

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    thanks all, esp sin.

    sin about that communications part --- erm does pure talk with people count?

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by wildhoney
    thanks all, esp sin.

    sin about that communications part --- erm does pure talk with people count?
    No prob.

    About the pure talk part. Not too sure .What's the purpose in the talking. I'm very sure chit chatting and gossiping about the bosses do not qualify as experience (unless your job title is "malcontent spreader and workflow disruptor) .

  15. #15

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    Originally posted by willyfoo

    Btw, I am still hiring... anybody keen??
    as a developer?

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    Originally posted by wildhoney
    My dream would be to do my Masters in Communication Studies at NTU. My current line of work would allow me to do just an MBA and not the other cos a Masters in Comm studies requires relevant working experience in the media line.

    Are web designers considered to be working in the media industry?
    I mean, after all the Web is a form of media.
    nope, to be honest, design work isn't considered mainstream media work. those would cover things like journalism, production work (like broadcast producers), sub-editors, mabbe even PR practitioners. i'm a mass comm/journalism grad who's been around for a while and run my own little business now so if you ask me, i don't think you can quote web design experience as media-related.

    then again, it's possible to pull it off if your web design experience was from one of the mainstream media like the now defunct Project Eyeball (web version), AsiaOne, ST Interactive or one of the Internet media like CNET Asia, Zaobao.com. etc. but even then, it's quite a long shot (unless you throw in some editorial skills in the mix...)

  17. #17

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    It's tough nowadays really, esp when the market in Singapore is quite bad...
    Overseas, a freelance web-designer can earn 3 - 5 times or even more ).

    I'm currently a full-time webdesigner... and also doing freelance on my own. just graduated from NYP... Basically to survive in this industry is basically to be an all rounder...
    2D and 3D Graphics, scripting from actionscripting to backend stuffs like Coldfusion and PHP... Film, Sound and Video...Motion graphics. Basically learn everything you can.
    That also means, u have not much of a life really.... OTing in office until early mornings for days in a row... OT at home... basically, sleep deprived....
    Stress all the time yet still have to think of new and refreshing ideas... Designing isn't easy... it can kill lots of brain cells in a matter of few hours, esp if inspiration doesn't comes knocking on your door...

    Basically, to survive in this business, u need lots of patience and also passion...
    I've been freelancing since my poly years... and clients aren't that easy to deal with either...

    as u can see, i'm ranting.. hahaha.... i guess i need to let out a little steam once in a while to keep myself sane...

  18. #18

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    Wow... you've dug up a thread that is 2 years old...

  19. #19

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    wahahha, i didn't realize that :P

  20. #20
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    Now very hard to find a job

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