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Thread: Double exposure on film

  1. #1

    Default Double exposure on film

    how can i do double exposure using film? How do we meter and how many stops do we overexpose each frame?

  2. #2
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Double exposure on film

    That’s depend on what camera you use, and what kind of double exposes of multiple exposes you want to archived, if it’s like 2 images overlapping, you underexposure each images by one stop.

    if it’s no overlapping, it should be no changing of exposure.

    Hope this help.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Double exposure on film

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights
    Thatís depend on what camera you use, and what kind of double exposes of multiple exposes you want to archived, if itís like 2 images overlapping, you underexposure each images by one stop.

    if itís no overlapping, it should be no changing of exposure.

    Hope this help.
    Probably a scene where there sky (background) is too bright and the buildings (foreground) is normal lit. If i take a single exposure with the buildings correctly expose, the sky will be blown out, if i take a beautifully expose sky, the buildings will be terribly underexpose.

    but from what you said, underexpose each image by 1 stop, won't it make the overall picture dark when i put the 2 frames together and print/scan?

  4. #4

    Default Re: Double exposure on film

    all i know is that every subsequent frame must underexpose by 1 stop relative to the previous frame.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Double exposure on film

    or is it the other way round..that means the first shot must underexpose..lol i havent done it in a long time liaos

  6. #6
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Double exposure on film

    Quote Originally Posted by behyx
    Probably a scene where there sky (background) is too bright and the buildings (foreground) is normal lit. If i take a single exposure with the buildings correctly expose, the sky will be blown out, if i take a beautifully expose sky, the buildings will be terribly underexpose.

    but from what you said, underexpose each image by 1 stop, won't it make the overall picture dark when i put the 2 frames together and print/scan?
    Most people will use gradual ND filters for this kind of shot if it is daylight scene. You canít have a double exposure for this kind of scene without masking.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Double exposure on film

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights
    Most people will use gradual ND filters for this kind of shot if it is daylight scene. You canít have a double exposure for this kind of scene without masking.
    Yup, this is the way to deal with such a scene, especially with colors.

    If you are using black& white, you may "darken" the sky with colored filters like a deep yellow or orange. Red is usally too dramatic and makes foliage very dark. The sky can then be burned in during printing.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Double exposure on film

    1 stop for both shots will do

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