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Thread: Overexposed Photos When Outdoors

  1. #21
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
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    Default Re: Overexposed Photos When Outdoors

    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic View Post
    Actually I started off shooting in P-mode, AV, and TV. Only recently did I start venturing into Manual Mode. In the first 3 modes, I could adjust the exposure as it was pretty straight forward. However in Manual mode, I could not adjust the exposure in similar fashion. Instead I only saw the AEB which only allows me to set a bracket range. I still don't really know what the bracket means. If I don't set the brackets in AEB, I can see the meter in my view finder and how it moves around depending on lighting. I tend to snap pictures when the meter is one notch above the mid, but somehow the exposure of the final picture still varies - for example sometimes the meter could be 2 notches below but then the final picture still turns out fine. Or the meter could indicate 1 notch above the mid, but the final picture still turns out under-exposed. I still can't figure out the link and why doesn't it give me a consistent exposure level. In the case of under bright sunlight, my picture still turns out very over-exposed even when it is about 1 notch above mid. From what I've read in the posts so far, the exposure metering is something I can look into.

    Like what Octarine mentioned, time to dig up the manual

    Thanks!
    Try some of this links to youtube videos to give you some starting pointers to get you on the way to understanding manual metering, dealing with difficult or harsh lighting situations..etc


    A Practical Overview of the In-Camera Metering Modes
    http://youtu.be/Jh_Fc4JKOBw

    Built-In Lighter Meter in Manual Mode - Understanding Exposure - DSLR Tutorial For Beginners
    http://youtu.be/UF246_dmMaA

    How Exposure & Metering Works in Your DSLR Camera
    http://youtu.be/DilvMehwbpY

    DSLR Camera Metering Modes Explained
    http://youtu.be/MVVjtJ8yxqI

    Understanding and Choosing Camera Metering Modes | Understanding The Camera Meter
    http://youtu.be/99MnkyzW3IY

    How to Meter a Photograph
    http://youtu.be/kg_K2rEI9Z4

    How to set Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO when shooting in Manual Mode
    http://youtu.be/MGhvbJvrcrE


    Canon 100D Menu User Guide (I viewed this to see what your camera features your 100D has and yes it does have a manual mode)
    http://youtu.be/s1l06mwvanA

    Canon EOS 100D Digital SLR review ( show you how to set manual mode )
    http://youtu.be/JWAezZ85iVQ

    How to Set Manual Exposure on a Canon Digital Rebel Camera (which I think is similar to the 100D)
    http://youtu.be/AyeNP9hUk2M

    How the Camera Meter Works and When it Gets it Wrong | Understanding The Camera Meter
    http://youtu.be/PN9SRkkAyoA


    Last edited by sammy888; 24th February 2015 at 01:43 AM. Reason: typo
    A good photo's 45% you, 45% practice & 10% equipment. A bad photo share the same ratio.

  2. #22

    Default Re: Overexposed Photos When Outdoors

    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic View Post

    Actually when on Manual mode, I haven't figured out how to adjust the exposure like in P mode. :P I only know that I can sort of set a bracket, but then I don't get to force the exposure up or down.
    If you are talking about "Exposure Compensation" (EC), it don't work in full manual (M) mode. In M-mode, you adjust the "Exposure Compensation" by adjusting one of the 3 parameters: ISO, Shutter-Speed and Aperture.

    From what I understand, for example, if the camera is in Aperture Priority Mode (Av), the camera will automatically select the Shutter Speed. Using "Exposure Compensation" the Photographer can manually override that automatic Shutter Speed Choice.

  3. #23

    Default Re: Overexposed Photos When Outdoors

    TS, as mentioned, you will need to get a grasp of the basics of exposure.
    Do check out your camera menu and do some read up on the web (on camera basics and exposure)

    Likely case, you are running up against the limitation of the camera as well.
    The 100D max shutter speed is 1/4000.
    Take a midday Sun, Sunny16 example.
    1/100; f16; ISO100
    You want f2 (keeping ISO100)
    That means shutter speed needs to be about 1/6400 (which your camera can only do 1/4000).
    This is not even considering light colored surfaces which may need more than that to tone down.

    To get around this, shoot in shaded spot. (at the least, get your subject into a shaded spot)
    Else use a ND filter.

    Think also about the quality of the light.
    Shooting in open Sun may not be flattering for your subject too (so shaded spot can help)

  4. #24
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Overexposed Photos When Outdoors

    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic View Post
    Actually I started off shooting in P-mode, AV, and TV. Only recently did I start venturing into Manual Mode.
    Could you give us an idea why you ventured into manual mode? What was your intention? What did you miss in the three modes that M could provide? What did you hope to achieve?
    EOS

  5. #25
    Senior Member shierwin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Overexposed Photos When Outdoors

    http://www.dummies.com/how-to/conten...-exposure.html

    Based on the table on sunny 16 rule in the attached link, to shoot at f2 ISO 100, need shutter speed of 1/6,400

    Can your camera make it?

    And Exposure Compenation does not work in M Mode!

  6. #26
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    Default Re: Overexposed Photos When Outdoors

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    Could you give us an idea why you ventured into manual mode? What was your intention? What did you miss in the three modes that M could provide? What did you hope to achieve?
    It's just like why I prefer driving a Manual car instead of an Auto car, and how even using Paddle Shifts just does cut it either. P, TV, and AV modes are pretty much semi-auto modes like Paddle Shifts in a car


    Quote Originally Posted by shierwin View Post
    http://www.dummies.com/how-to/conten...-exposure.html

    Based on the table on sunny 16 rule in the attached link, to shoot at f2 ISO 100, need shutter speed of 1/6,400

    Can your camera make it?

    And Exposure Compenation does not work in M Mode!

    Wow my camera only goes up to 1/4000. And yeah I realized that EC doesn't work in M-mode last night after reading the manual!

  7. #27

    Default Re: Overexposed Photos When Outdoors

    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic View Post
    It's just like why I prefer driving a Manual car instead of an Auto car, and how even using Paddle Shifts just does cut it either. P, TV, and AV modes are pretty much semi-auto modes like Paddle Shifts in a car

    Wow my camera only goes up to 1/4000. And yeah I realized that EC doesn't work in M-mode last night after reading the manual!
    The analogy doesn't hold up very well. And even if it did, you need to know HOW to handle manual transmission before going out on the road! You don't do the same with focus (ie. switch to MF because you prefer manual), do you now?

    The fact that you don't know that compensation doesn't work in Manual mode tells us that you don't really UNDERSTAND the modes and the reasons you use each (don't screw around with Scene modes). Bone up on all the tutorials provided in the links and you will understand. Just don't expect instant answers if you really want to learn.

  8. #28
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Overexposed Photos When Outdoors

    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic View Post
    It's just like why I prefer driving a Manual car instead of an Auto car, and how even using Paddle Shifts just does cut it either. P, TV, and AV modes are pretty much semi-auto modes like Paddle Shifts in a car
    While I understand the idea I cannot agree. First of all: do not use Manual for the sake of it. Pointless. Secondly, paddle shifts also exist for a reason: simply because the automatic clutch system is faster and better than the human leg. Especially with the horsepower beasts of 200 bhp and more.
    And that's exactly the reason why these semi-automatic modes exist: they are simply faster than you in measuring exposure and setting the parameters. If you shoot landscapes, by all means use everything manual. The typical landscape is patient and holds still, only occasional clouds might change the light a bit. A studio shoot is similar. But for any scene where you or the subject moves you will have a hard time with manual exposure adjustment. In addition, your attention is diverted from watching composition or other aspects towards the exposure needle.
    You show pictures, not camera settings
    EOS

  9. #29
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Overexposed Photos When Outdoors

    You can find this book in National Library,

    Just borrow and read it.

    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
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  10. #30
    Senior Member shierwin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Overexposed Photos When Outdoors

    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic View Post
    Wow my camera only goes up to 1/4000. And yeah I realized that EC doesn't work in M-mode last night after reading the manual!
    That's the reason why the Camera Manual is included in the sale bundle and reading it had been a regular feedback on such queries

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