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Thread: "Being born into a poor family means you are finished" (at least in Japan)

  1. #21
    Senior Member UncleFai's Avatar
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    Default Re: "Being born into a poor family means you are finished" (at least in Japan)

    Quote Originally Posted by Poseidon88 View Post
    Just for your information. .....in the YEAR 2015 !!!

    In Germany, the study is free at the university. (no tuition fees) Each student whether rich or poor can study what he wants.
    And if the parents of students have little money the student will get 670,00 euros (appr. 1050,00 S$) per month from the state.
    (BAföG))
    In Germany is no limit to how far you can go - or you cannot go.
    An ascent is therefore always and at any time possible.
    In their system there is something subtle and technical that stops one from going further in studies. It is called by the big bombastic term of EXAM. Fail your exams and see how far you can go lor.

  2. #22

    Default Re: "Being born into a poor family means you are finished" (at least in Japan)

    in japan where you grad from is more important than what you grad in.
    i.e. it doesn't matter if you studied something obscure in Tokyo University, you will still be hired by big MNC/govt just because you are a Todai grad.

    many unis run their own high school, primary school and kindergarten, your passage to that uni is more secure if you get into their kindy first.
    kids with alumni parents have a better chance (sound familiar?)

  3. #23

    Default Re: "Being born into a poor family means you are finished" (at least in Japan)

    "Free" as in paid by taxpayers. Sorry there is no such thing as a free lunch in this world.

    Quote Originally Posted by Poseidon88 View Post
    Just for your information. .....in the YEAR 2015 !!!

    In Germany, the study is free at the university. (no tuition fees) Each student whether rich or poor can study what he wants.
    And if the parents of students have little money the student will get 670,00 euros (appr. 1050,00 S$) per month from the state.
    (BAföG))
    In Germany is no limit to how far you can go - or you cannot go.
    An ascent is therefore always and at any time possible.

  4. #24

    Default Re: "Being born into a poor family means you are finished" (at least in Japan)

    Quote Originally Posted by mamypoko View Post
    "Free" as in paid by taxpayers. Sorry there is no such thing as a free lunch in this world.
    i have a colleague from indonesia who did his post-grad in germany about 8-10 years back.
    i think he still had to pay for his tuition fee though at a highly discounted rate (undergrads get it free both local and foreign), but what really impressed him was:

    1. free healthcare, even for foreign students spouse. his classmate wife (foreigner, not studying) was diagnosed with brain tumor, did the operation in germany for free.
    2. germany paid for his plane ticket, because indonesia is classified as "poor". he had already bought his tickets and they reimbursed him.

    question is, will singaporeans again gripe when free education/healthcare is given to foreigners (and locals)?
    flame on.
    Last edited by cks2k2; 2nd March 2015 at 06:29 PM.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: "Being born into a poor family means you are finished" (at least in Japan)

    Quote Originally Posted by mamypoko View Post
    "Free" as in paid by taxpayers. Sorry there is no such thing as a free lunch in this world.
    Of course, the study of students is paid with tax money. This is the best investment that can make a state.
    What's the problem for you?

  6. #26
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: "Being born into a poor family means you are finished" (at least in Japan)

    Quote Originally Posted by mamypoko View Post
    "Free" as in paid by taxpayers. Sorry there is no such thing as a free lunch in this world.
    Well, what would you prefer? A few % tax points or the 5..6 digit figures students and their families have to fork out or getting indebted for?
    Would you really feel ripped off if you were to pay for your neighbor's kids as well through your income tax?
    EOS

  7. #27

    Default Re: "Being born into a poor family means you are finished" (at least in Japan)

    Few %? I don't think so.

    I don't feel ripped off, it's just not right to use the word free, when essentially you are paying it back when you start working, 14% as the lowest base rate in Germany.

    6 figures? Which course? I remember seeing only lower 5s when I was looking at courses. Still a diploma holder here.



    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    Well, what would you prefer? A few % tax points or the 5..6 digit figures students and their families have to fork out or getting indebted for?
    Would you really feel ripped off if you were to pay for your neighbor's kids as well through your income tax?

  8. #28

    Default Re: "Being born into a poor family means you are finished" (at least in Japan)

    Quote Originally Posted by cks2k2 View Post
    i have a colleague from indonesia who did his post-grad in germany about 8-10 years back.
    i think he still had to pay for his tuition fee though at a highly discounted rate (undergrads get it free both local and foreign), but what really impressed him was:

    1. free healthcare, even for foreign students spouse. his classmate wife (foreigner, not studying) was diagnosed with brain tumor, did the operation in germany for free.
    2. germany paid for his plane ticket, because indonesia is classified as "poor". he had already bought his tickets and they reimbursed him.

    In Germany the FT percentage is ~8%. Their FT student population in universities is ~10%.
    In Sg the FT (non-residents + PR) percentage is ~40%. The FT student population in engineering courses in universities is ~27%.
    Therefore you can afford to be more generous to FTs in Germany than in Sg.

    Quote Originally Posted by cks2k2 View Post
    question is, will singaporeans again gripe when free education/healthcare is given to foreigners (and locals)?
    flame on.
    Very few of the 27% FT students in engineering pay full fees. Since there are no protests on this issue, we can only conclude sgreans support this

  9. #29
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: "Being born into a poor family means you are finished" (at least in Japan)

    Quote Originally Posted by mamypoko View Post
    Few %? I don't think so.
    I don't feel ripped off, it's just not right to use the word free, when essentially you are paying it back when you start working, 14% as the lowest base rate in Germany.
    6 figures? Which course? I remember seeing only lower 5s when I was looking at courses. Still a diploma holder here.
    I think you mix up two things here: actual fees (to be paid to university) and the BAföG. There are no fees that students have to pay to public universities.
    The government support of BAföG is a loan to help them having a living while they study in case their family can't support them and / or the part time job is not giving them enough money.
    BAföG payback can also be waived or cut under certain conditions.
    EOS

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