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Thread: Entry to film photography

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikonzen View Post
    Sort of in a way and you can also include white balance for elimination as well...different films have different kelvin temperatures (at least this is the case for color films) There is no focus peaking in any of the films cameras I have ever used. I believe modern AF film units from the majors (they still make them too!) are very capable of nailing focus consistently. Yes a small notebook is one way of doing it and a good method as well.

    Not to try to persuade you in any fashion but I will contrast my previous paragraph concerning film with what I think digital in the same sort of terms is like. One of the great advantages of digital is that you can snap away snap away at a much lower cost per image than with film. I refer you to a saying by the great photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson. HCB said "Your first ten thousand photographs are your worst." Modern AF capability and low light performance in digital cameras is sort of in a golden age nowadays IMO. The newer cameras are simply outstanding. A good analogy might be flight envelopes. A P51 Mustang has a great flight envelope...a F4 Phantom has a superior one. Still they will all get one where one needs to go. With a modern digital wifi capable camera and a digital notepad or laptop or whatever one can drop snaps on these devices and have the data recorded faster than snapping your fingers almost.
    I intend on using manual focus since I wouldn't be doing any sports shots. But that's a surprise, they still manufacture film cameras? I always thought there's only antique and refurbished ones now. Any you know of(slr/rf) that's fully mechanical in those? I'm totally the type that adores mechanical structures. I've seen some film camera reviews where in the middle of the frame lines there's misaligned lines to help with focusing. How does those type work? I assume not all viewfinders work in that way right? Im gonna assume in those type the manual focus assist lines work only for the middle of the framing? Be patient with me haha I know that's a crap load of question:-))

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikonzen View Post
    Sort of in a way and you can also include white balance for elimination as well...different films have different kelvin temperatures (at least this is the case for color films) There is no focus peaking in any of the films cameras I have ever used. I believe modern AF film units from the majors (they still make them too!) are very capable of nailing focus consistently. Yes a small notebook is one way of doing it and a good method as well.

    Not to try to persuade you in any fashion but I will contrast my previous paragraph concerning film with what I think digital in the same sort of terms is like. One of the great advantages of digital is that you can snap away snap away at a much lower cost per image than with film. I refer you to a saying by the great photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson. HCB said "Your first ten thousand photographs are your worst." Modern AF capability and low light performance in digital cameras is sort of in a golden age nowadays IMO. The newer cameras are simply outstanding. A good analogy might be flight envelopes. A P51 Mustang has a great flight envelope...a F4 Phantom has a superior one. Still they will all get one where one needs to go. With a modern digital wifi capable camera and a digital notepad or laptop or whatever one can drop snaps on these devices and have the data recorded faster than snapping your fingers almost.
    The convenience and portability is the least of my worries i'd say

  3. #23

    Default Re: Entry to film photography

    Quote Originally Posted by LeoTheSolar View Post
    I intend on using manual focus since I wouldn't be doing any sports shots. But that's a surprise, they still manufacture film cameras? I always thought there's only antique and refurbished ones now. Any you know of(slr/rf) that's fully mechanical in those? I'm totally the type that adores mechanical structures. I've seen some film camera reviews where in the middle of the frame lines there's misaligned lines to help with focusing. How does those type work? I assume not all viewfinders work in that way right? Im gonna assume in those type the manual focus assist lines work only for the middle of the framing? Be patient with me haha I know that's a crap load of question:-))
    The kind of cameras with misaligned lines to help with focusing are called rangefinders. Essentially you focus till there is no ghosting within that little square box in the viewfinder. No ghosting = in focus

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by sevomadus View Post

    The kind of cameras with misaligned lines to help with focusing are called rangefinders. Essentially you focus till there is no ghosting within that little square box in the viewfinder. No ghosting = in focus
    Or did he mean split screen?
    hi

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    Quote Originally Posted by sevomadus View Post

    The kind of cameras with misaligned lines to help with focusing are called rangefinders. Essentially you focus till there is no ghosting within that little square box in the viewfinder. No ghosting = in focus
    So that's how it works... Thanks for the tip!

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    Quote Originally Posted by silvermoon1407 View Post

    Or did he mean split screen?
    Nah sevomedas has the answer to my question. Thanks for trying to help anyways =)

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    Quote Originally Posted by sevomadus View Post

    The kind of cameras with misaligned lines to help with focusing are called rangefinders. Essentially you focus till there is no ghosting within that little square box in the viewfinder. No ghosting = in focus
    But it's only as a middle point focus assist right?

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Entry to film photography

    Quote Originally Posted by LeoTheSolar View Post
    Wow thats alot of information to digest xD I think I would want to focus on improving my raw photography skills, not relying too much on post processing. I have a general purpose scanner/printer, but will it work the same as a dedicated film scanner?
    Quote Originally Posted by LeoTheSolar View Post
    Wouldnt it already be easier than digital since the iso is fixed for a roll of film( that's one variable taken out ain't it =0 ).
    Is there focus peaking in film cameras? Since it seems to make focusing real easy.
    Perhaps it's a good idea to note down exposure settings for each frame taken? So after developing i'll know roughly what's wrong =0

    if you really want to lean the basic, what you need is discipline, not a film camera.

    of course, telling people you are shooting on film is sound so cool, and slinging a film camera is more cool than a DSLR which is so common nowadays.
    but don't forget shooting film is getting more costly nowadays, and unless you are shooting on slide film, else you don't how screw up is your exposure, (you are not experience enough to know had you nailed exposure by judging the density of negative film)
    and unless you are keeping a shooting log, else how do you know what is your exposure setting for this frame that you shot three weeks ago?
    so you tell me, if you can't get a proper feedback, what is there for you to learn?


    for your info, you can use any DSLR to learn the basic, with using preset WB, manual exposure, smallest JPG format, manual focusing if you want to, don't chimp on LCD,
    no delete photo on the spot, limit to 36 frames on an outing, don't post fix exposure or whatever.
    when you review the photos on your computer, study the lighting, and also exif data.
    you will learn much better, faster and save a lot of cost in this way.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post

    if you really want to lean the basic, what you need is discipline, not a film camera.

    of course, telling people you are shooting on film is sound so cool, and slinging a film camera is more cool than a DSLR which is so common nowadays.
    but don't forget shooting film is getting more costly nowadays, and unless you are shooting on slide film, else you don't how screw up is your exposure, (you are not experience enough to know had you nailed exposure by judging the density of negative film)
    and unless you are keeping a shooting log, else how do you know what is your exposure setting for this frame that you shot three weeks ago?
    so you tell me, if you can't get a proper feedback, what is there for you to learn?

    for your info, you can use any DSLR to learn the basic, with using preset WB, manual exposure, smallest JPG format, manual focusing if you want to, don't chimp on LCD,
    no delete photo on the spot, limit to 36 frames on an outing, don't post fix exposure or whatever.
    when you review the photos on your computer, study the lighting, and also exif data.
    you will learn much better, faster and save a lot of cost in this way.
    Actually it's more like the opposite for the people I mix around, who'd rather go for " latest tech is better"
    Thanks for considering so many factors. I do intend to keep a separate log, every frame, every roll.
    I'm seeing more and more reasons analogue is for me. Many of which had been asked as above.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Nikonzen's Avatar
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    Default Re: Entry to film photography

    Quote Originally Posted by LeoTheSolar View Post
    Be patient with me haha I know that's a crap load of question:-))
    No worries bro. All the time in the world for you sir. Maybe if I can help you learn something...maybe you will teach me something too! If we are studying by ourselves all of the time we are studying with a dummy right? haha

    Let me relay to you a little of my own personal history with cameras maybe it will even help you understand my enthusiasm for your thread. I have a fascination for mechanical things. I sort of found my way into photography as a serious hobby through microscopes and fish tanks which is another hobby of mine but I digress. You see I used old Carl Zeiss Jena microscopes from the 20's and 30's and through searching for them on places like Ebay I came across Zeiss rangefinder cameras. I had always loved cameras so I started buying up that stuff and studying the craft. Well turns out much of the rangefinder stuff that I preferred (stuff like the Leica M2 and MP or the new Zeiss Ikons) were beyond my means when considering the lenses and the rest of the kit. So then my study turned towards the SLR's chiefly the Nikon F2 with DE-1 Eye-level finder (that camera is in my avatar) and a real thorough study of the F mount lenses available for the system. These were within my means and soon enough I had my gear and was able to begin by learning the very basics...exposure triangle and sunny 16. A very difficult proposition for a beginner. After about 30 rolls of film or so I started to get the hang of it but the cost of film and processing not to mention the increasing difficulty of finding these services locally I finally decided to get something digital. I chose the Nikon D5000 because I already had a nice set of F mount glass and the D5000 was cheap, good, and compatible with my lenses. It has to be used on M mode with manual focusing with no meter but guess what? That is how I had already been shooting all along.

    Currently I am thinking of purchasing a Nikon D7000 or D700 probably and a 35-70/2.8 AFD...I am ready to get lazy with my photography and I can still use my lenses plus they will meter with these camera models. If I had my druthers I would get a Df. I feel itis the best camera on the market for the money with the lenses I own. I have some rangefinder cameras that I will dig up some pictures of to show...my fixed lens stuff.

    I still shoot my film cameras from time to time just to keep them working good.

    Look at the FM Nikons...bad to the bone little units...mechanical. Also the F2 or F2AS if possible. Canon F-1 and FD lenses if your Canon. Olympus OM series is extremely nice!
    Last edited by Nikonzen; 26th January 2015 at 12:42 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikonzen View Post

    No worries bro. All the time in the world for you sir. Maybe if I can help you learn something...maybe you will teach me something too! If we are studying by ourselves all of the time we are studying with a dummy right? haha

    Let me relay to you a little of my own personal history with cameras maybe it will even help you understand my enthusiasm for your thread. I have a fascination for mechanical things. I sort of found my way into photography as a serious hobby through microscopes and fish tanks which is another hobby of mine but I digress. You see I used old Carl Zeiss Jena microscopes from the 20's and 30's and through searching for them on places like Ebay I came across Zeiss rangefinder cameras. I had always loved cameras so I started buying up that stuff and studying the craft. Well turns out much of the rangefinder stuff that I preferred (stuff like the Leica M2 and MP or the new Zeiss Ikons) were beyond my means when considering the lenses and the rest of the kit. So then my study turned towards the SLR's chiefly the Nikon F2 with DE-1 Eye-level finder (that camera is in my avatar) and a real thorough study of the F mount lenses available for the system. These were within my means and soon enough I had my gear and was able to begin by learning the very basics...exposure triangle and sunny 16. A very difficult proposition for a beginner. After about 30 rolls of film or so I started to get the hang of it but the cost of film and processing not to mention the increasing difficulty of finding these services locally I finally decided to get something digital. I chose the Nikon D5000 because I already had a nice set of F mount glass and the D5000 was cheap, good, and compatible with my lenses. It has to be used on M mode with manual focusing with no meter but guess what? That is how I had already been shooting all along.

    Currently I am thinking of purchasing a Nikon D7000 and a 35-70/2.8 AFD...I am ready to get lazy with my photography and I can still use my lenses plus they will meter with this camera model. I have some rangefinder cameras that I will dig up some pictures of to show...my fixed lens stuff.

    I still shoot my film cameras from time to time just to keep them working good.

    Look at the FM Nikons...bad to the bone little units...mechanical. Also the F2 or F2AS if possible. Canon F-1 and FD lenses if your Canon. Olympus OM series is extremely nice!
    I can totally feel your passion!!!
    I did abit of read up on leica and nikons, glad to know of their legacy and continued dedication to film!

  12. #32
    Senior Member Nikonzen's Avatar
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    Default Re: Entry to film photography

    Here are a couple of links for you to look over. I highly recommend the magazine Popular Photography aka Pop Photo. The second link is good old technical fundamental stuff bookmark that one for sure. The photographer in that one liked using rangefinders.

    http://petapixel.com/2015/01/19/hunt...s-photography/

    http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2011/06/robert-capa/ (That whole Great Compositions section is an incredible treasure trove of information.)
    Last edited by Nikonzen; 26th January 2015 at 01:58 PM.
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  13. #33

    Default Re: Entry to film photography

    Check out the thread in the Medium / Large format and Rangefinders / SLR sub sections, we have outings regularly and we have a lot of people who are willing to share on film, developing, darkroom etc.

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    Default Re: Entry to film photography


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    Quote Originally Posted by mamypoko View Post
    Check out the thread in the Medium / Large format and Rangefinders / SLR sub sections, we have outings regularly and we have a lot of people who are willing to share on film, developing, darkroom etc.
    Alright thanks for the heads up!

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    Quote Originally Posted by sevomadus View Post
    Can check this out also
    Seen this one before already. It's what led me to reading up articles on Japan camera hunter's site!

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    Went down to city hall area earlier today. Was a total eye opener for me. So many different models! Nikon F3 that is so commonly mentioned seems to have different variations. F3T?? F3HP?? Simply overwhelming.
    I think what I need to do is narrowing it down to just ONE specific body and lens, then either camp the personal classified section of the forum for those selling the specific model when I have the cash, or seek out a one-stop shop where the shop owner is also the shop tender, that is actually passionate about this himself/ herself. Peninsula/ excelsior seems to have a lot of shops doing this as just a means to earn.
    One crucial thing I didn't ask about I think is the lenses. When looking, at film camera lenses what are the evaluating criterias?(other than it being a fast 50mm prime)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikonzen View Post
    Here are a couple of links for you to look over. I highly recommend the magazine Popular Photography aka Pop Photo. The second link is good old technical fundamental stuff bookmark that one for sure. The photographer in that one liked using rangefinders.


    (That whole Great Compositions section is an incredible treasure trove of information.)
    Spotted the Bessars you spoke of earlier, they seem quite rare considering only a few shops I see hold them. I think I have my eyes on nikons. Decently priced, yet looking more gorgeous than I thought they would be. I'm guessing from today's trip it would set me back at about 200-600 for body and around 300 for a 50 F1.4. Didn't manage to visit peek! since I went down the wrong street and all the way to bugis. Not sure why, but it feels to me those in Adelphi are more reliable.

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    Default Re: Entry to film photography

    Hi Leo,
    Great to see that someone who is so enthusiastic about film photography. As some of the fellow Clubsnappers have mentioned, A Bessa R will be a great option as it have a good range of lenses that are still in production. It might be worth considering later to get a SLR from either Nikon or Canon such as a F5/6 or EOS-1V to make use of the greater range of AF lenses available. If you are looking for a more classic camera, on top of the regular shops at Adelphi and Peninsular, you can also consider looking on auction sites. Cameras in great condition can be found on Ebay and even the 2nd hand section at BHphoto or Adorama. I have found some such as a Oly OM-1n, Hassie 501cm in great conditions from fellow enthusiasts in Japan and the States.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prismatic View Post
    Hi Leo,
    Great to see that someone who is so enthusiastic about film photography. As some of the fellow Clubsnappers have mentioned, A Bessa R will be a great option as it have a good range of lenses that are still in production. It might be worth considering later to get a SLR from either Nikon or Canon such as a F5/6 or EOS-1V to make use of the greater range of AF lenses available. If you are looking for a more classic camera, on top of the regular shops at Adelphi and Peninsular, you can also consider looking on auction sites. Cameras in great condition can be found on Ebay and even the 2nd hand section at BHphoto or Adorama. I have found some such as a Oly OM-1n, Hassie 501cm in great conditions from fellow enthusiasts in Japan and the States.
    Haha good suggestion. Im now in amidst of saving up for one! I'll go with either 3 options: 1)[ the most cost efficient?] Personal classified section here(i think i've seen some pretty reasonable prices there from fellow clubsnap users too). 2) regular shops. 3)[ probably the most expensive way] thru Japan Camera Hunter. He seems to be really trusted. Just can't bring myself to trust shady e-bay users. As for the other two shops overseas. Think I might put them as last consideration. Thanks alot for your suggestions anyways! 2:55am reply!!

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