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Thread: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

  1. #21

    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nikonzen View Post
    Here is a sample of 105 on DX Fujifilm Crop. I was just a guest with a camera here so I stayed out of the way.

    Thanks Nikonzen!
    I shall consider 100mm glass.

  2. #22

    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by undergrd View Post
    Agree with some of the bros here. As a 3rd photographer, i think one of your considerations is not to interfere with the main 2. Best is a long lens and snipe from far since you are probably more of a candid shooter.
    Thanks undergrd!
    My main aim is a candid shooter and also to fill the non main characters shoot.

  3. #23
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Keong View Post
    My main aim is a candid shooter and also to fill the non main characters shoot.
    Your initial intention was about portraits As you can see, purpose and target should be your first and main consideration. Equipment is last (but not least).
    EOS

  4. #24

    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kermitfm View Post
    To directly answer your question, 50mm is definitely alright for the half body portraits using a crop sensor camera. The fast aperture f1.8 or faster is also good to provide background separation and shooting in low light condition.

    As advised by some posters here, as a 3rd shooter, you should not interfere with the primary photographers. Try to focus on the periphery of the event, to cover those shots that the main photographers are not shooting. eg. when the bride and groom are walking in to the dining room, focus on the parents and their proud faces. This way, the couple will have better view of the the whole event when they look through the photos. If you are quick in changing lenses, then have a zoom handy so that you can compose without moving.

    Most important point: ask the person who engaged you (the main photographers or the couple), what are their expectation (backup to the 2 photographers or complement with environmental shots or .)

    Cheers
    Thanks Kermitfm!

    The expectation is to backup and complement the two photographers and provide candid shots.
    I shall include both 85mm and 100mm in the loan considerations.

  5. #25
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Keong View Post

    Thanks daredevil123!
    I shall consider 85mm or 100mm so as not to obstruct the first two photographers.
    85 or 100mm still short. I would use a 70-200 if i am in your shoes...

  6. #26

    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by SkyStrike View Post
    I think it's starting to go abit off topic liao... The "casual" wedding dinner shooter topic kinda draws alot of heated debates.

    If you have an option of shooting with a lens 70-200 f2.8, I'll suggest using that over the 85mm. One reason why I'll suggest such long lens is as mentioned by others is to not obstruct/limit the 1st and 2nd shooter's movement and angles. Some of them tends to run all over the place. *Probably one of the last thing you will want to do is to shoot right behind them*

    And, if you are not the main photog team, I won't recommend firing flash at all. Since it may potentially cause the "banding" issue for some critical shots.


    For your original question: Just found the link to the portrait and focal length post... http://stepheneastwood.com/tutorials.../strippage.htm
    I think the images are self-explanatory.

    Here's a thumbnail view of those images I grabbed off Google images
    Thanks SkyStrike!

    I shall consider from 70mm onwards and will not be using flash.
    Hope my noob comments did not insult any pro wedding photographers out there.

  7. #27

    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    Your initial intention was about portraits As you can see, purpose and target should be your first and main consideration. Equipment is last (but not least).
    Thanks Octarine!

    Sorry for the misunderstanding. the main aim is to take portrait candid shots.

  8. #28

    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by daredevil123 View Post
    85 or 100mm still short. I would use a 70-200 if i am in your shoes...
    Thanks daredevil123!

    As I do not have 70-200mm so I wiill borrowing 85mm(136mm) or 100mm(160mm) for my crop body.
    would 136mm or 160mm still be short for my crop body?

  9. #29
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    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Keong View Post
    Thanks SkyStrike!

    I shall consider from 70mm onwards and will not be using flash.
    Hope my noob comments did not insult any pro wedding photographers out there.
    I dun think it will be an insult. Just that some just don't like "uncle bob".

    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Keong View Post
    Thanks daredevil123!

    As I do not have 70-200mm so I wiill borrowing 85mm(136mm) or 100mm(160mm) for my crop body.
    would 136mm or 160mm still be short for my crop body?
    It really depends on the space available. You have to try out to know. tbh, I feel that in most ballrooms, 200mm (ff) to be short for where I want to stand
    Too many great equipments but too little quality photos. [My Flickr] | [My Blog]

  10. #30

    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by SkyStrike View Post
    I dun think it will be an insult. Just that some just don't like "uncle bob".



    It really depends on the space available. You have to try out to know. tbh, I feel that in most ballrooms, 200mm (ff) to be short for where I want to stand
    Thanks SkyStrike!

    Think I shall not ask wedding stuff questions here anymore.
    I shall go down to the ballroom with my crop and check out the space first.

    Thanks for the advice!

  11. #31
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Keong View Post

    Thanks daredevil123!

    As I do not have 70-200mm so I wiill borrowing 85mm(136mm) or 100mm(160mm) for my crop body.
    would 136mm or 160mm still be short for my crop body?
    Shooting candids mean reacting to moments. You are 3rd photographer do you have to avoid having eye contact with anyone the main phoyogrpahers are shooting. The further the better. Zoom also gives you very fast reaction times, so you will not move so much and bang into other people.

    Another thing, 100mm is a macro lens right? It will very slow focusing.

    Instead of borrowing those lenses, might as well borrow a 70-200/2.8

  12. #32

    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by daredevil123 View Post
    Shooting candids mean reacting to moments. You are 3rd photographer do you have to avoid having eye contact with anyone the main phoyogrpahers are shooting. The further the better. Zoom also gives you very fast reaction times, so you will not move so much and bang into other people.

    Another thing, 100mm is a macro lens right? It will very slow focusing.

    Instead of borrowing those lenses, might as well borrow a 70-200/2.8
    Thanks daredevil123!

    I don't know if I can borrow 70-200mm as my friend would be using it.
    I shall see if I can borrow a longer lens.

    Yes, the 100mm is a macro lens and the focus is slooooowwwwww..

    Thanks for the advice!

  13. #33

    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by SkyStrike View Post


    For your original question: Just found the link to the portrait and focal length post... http://stepheneastwood.com/tutorials.../strippage.htm
    I think the images are self-explanatory.

    Here's a thumbnail view of those images I grabbed off Google images

    It's a nice lab test. But in real life, you usually do not get so close and frame just the face (unless for passport photos), usually it will be half body or more.

    So the examples here of the short focal lengths are when the lens are near to the face, resulting in perspective distortion. If the lens are placed further away, the distortion is much less.

  14. #34
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edlet View Post

    It's a nice lab test. But in real life, you usually do not get so close and frame just the face (unless for passport photos), usually it will be half body or more.

    So the examples here of the short focal lengths are when the lens are near to the face, resulting in perspective distortion. If the lens are placed further away, the distortion is much less.
    Not just the face. Different focal lengths let you play with the "size" of the background, ie compression.

  15. #35

    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Thanks everyone for the advice.

    I have decided to buy a 50mm F1.8 for backup and managed to loan a 70-200mm F4 lens.
    Shall be closing this thread soon after scouting the venue this weekend.

    thank you!

  16. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Keong View Post
    Thanks everyone for the advice.

    I have decided to buy a 50mm F1.8 for backup and managed to loan a 70-200mm F4 lens.
    Shall be closing this thread soon after scouting the venue this weekend.

    thank you!
    Using f4 inside a ballroom without flash might present a bit of problem. Just watch out for the shutter speed and you may also need to boost up the ISO to get a steady shot.
    Last edited by KonTrol; 22nd January 2015 at 02:43 PM.
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  17. #37

    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by KonTrol View Post
    Using f4 inside a ballroom without flash might present a bit of problem. Just watch out for the shutter speed and you may also need to boost up the ISO to get a steady shot.
    Thanks KonTrol! I maybe borrowing a 135mm for backup then.

  18. #38
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    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Keong View Post
    Thanks KonTrol! I maybe borrowing a 135mm for backup then.
    There's also another problem of having too many lens when shooting. Your reaction may slow down when you have too many options to play around.

    If shooting f4 at 200mm, unless there's some spotlight on the subject, I hope you can get a shutter speed good enough to prevent hand shaking and movement blur.
    Too many great equipments but too little quality photos. [My Flickr] | [My Blog]

  19. #39
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    if you are familiar with wedding custom and procedure, it is fine you to use many lenses to shoot beside main photographer/s.
    else just keep it simple use a zoom lens to shoot whatever and whenever you can,
    the last things main photographers want to see is some uncle Bob blocking their views, hinder their movement, into their frame or slow down the event.

    try make yourself invisible if you can. everyone will appreciate that.
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  20. #40

    Default Re: [Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by SkyStrike View Post
    There's also another problem of having too many lens when shooting. Your reaction may slow down when you have too many options to play around.

    If shooting f4 at 200mm, unless there's some spotlight on the subject, I hope you can get a shutter speed good enough to prevent hand shaking and movement blur.
    Thanks SkyStrike!

    I will be taking one zoom and one prime and finalise after this weekend's discussion. Thanks for the advice, may drop the zoom if the results is not good.

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