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Thread: Grey Cards

  1. #1

    Default Grey Cards

    Hi, does anyone use grey card measuring often? If so...what will yr camera's mode be?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Grey Cards

    Spot/partial, or center-weighted. No point using Matrix/Evaluative since the point is to read the "average" exposure off the grey card.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Grey Cards

    you do not need gray card if you have an incident meter (the white dome)

  4. #4

    Default Re: Grey Cards

    I use grey card mostly for white balancing.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Grey Cards

    Thanks for the feedback...

  6. #6

    Default Re: Grey Cards

    Quote Originally Posted by jumbocrab
    I use grey card mostly for white balancing.
    Yeap, that's the other usage of a grey card.

    Back in the days of film, a grey card is very useful in obtaining "correct" exposures with scenes that has all highlights (white) or shadows (black).

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Grey Cards

    and what greycard do you use?
    A card bought off a shop or something else like a camera bag, cloth etc ?

  8. #8

    Default Re: Grey Cards

    I bought the Kodak set (there is a big card and a small card), which is commonly available in many places. Of course if you don't have a grey card with you and want to do white-balancing, you can use a white cloth or T-shirt. Although that may not be the most accurate, it is better than nothing.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Grey Cards

    Hi,

    Just wondering, what's White Balance? Is it something like balancing a scene which has mostly bright/white against a dark/black object and vice versa?

  10. #10

    Default Re: Grey Cards

    An object, under different colour light, will appear different in colour. For example, if you put a white cloth under orange light, then the cloth will appear orangy. When you take a picture, you can either capture it as you see it (ie, orangy), or you still want it to look white in colour in your picture. If you want it to look white, then you need to tell the camera that the lighting colour is now different, so that the camera can compensate for it. This is call white-balancing. Most camera has some algorithm to automatically "guess" the white-balance. But the more accurate way is to do it manually.

    The first reason why manual white-balancing is more accurate is because you are telling the camera exactly which object (for example, the grey card or white T-shirt) is "grey" (ie, same proportion of RGB). The second reason is because manual white-balancing is done Through-The-Lense, which means that any colouration introduced by your lens and filters will be compensated for.
    Last edited by jumbocrab; 2nd September 2005 at 11:14 PM.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Grey Cards

    Oh, thanks for the explanation. So by using a grey card, I can do WB on a manual camera?

  12. #12

    Default Re: Grey Cards

    Quote Originally Posted by LordAeRo
    Oh, thanks for the explanation. So by using a grey card, I can do WB on a manual camera?

    White balance is only applicable on digital camera. Colour balance on manual film camera are determine by film and use of filters.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Grey Cards

    Sorry, what do you mean "manual camera"? I am only familiar with white-balancing on digital SLR, not film.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Grey Cards

    Ah, thanks for the clarification guys. Learned something today.

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