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Thread: How do you plan your photoshoots?

  1. #1

    Default How do you plan your photoshoots?

    Hi there.... I did my very first debut 'photoshoot' today in school.
    Just to ask, how do you guys actually plan on what to bring along when you guys go on a photoshoot?

    Cause i actually brought along some stuff that i didn't need... (like a external flash, as all shots were done outdoors...)

    And my camera was being treated so appallingly that some idiot actually placed my camera on the road.... kerna scuff marks liao..


    This was what I brought:
    Tripod
    my F80, sb22s, 50mm f/1.8 and 24 - 85 AF-S


    Please advise me on this..
    Thanks a lot!

  2. #2
    ClubSNAP Idol Adam Goi's Avatar
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    For me, if it's places likes zoo, JBP, Sungei Buloh and such, I'll bring my telephoto zooms, i.e. 100mm and above. Flash, flash extender (if applicable), extra set of batteries for cam and flash, not to forget film too. In addition, a tripod, spare QR plate, wiping towel (for yourself), microfibre cloth, lens blower and that's about all. Ah...if you have cable release, bring it too!

    If it's shooting buildings and landscape, wide angle lens + a 50mm while if it's for portraiture or street, bring a general zoom like 28-105mm and a 50mm; don't forget the flash, especially if you have a bounce card, bring it too!

    I'm sure the more experienced ones here will tell you more!

  3. #3
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    for me, i have a "basic" kit that i bring everywhere (SLR, 2 lens, film, flash + omni-bounce, etc), then i access the shoot and decide what extra stuff + niceties to bring (filters, tripod, teleconverters, extension tubes, flash battery pack, etc). my basic kit should cover about 80% of the stuff i shoot, and the 20% depends on occasion.

    for example, like the Esplanade opening, i know i'll be shooting people and performers, so can forget the filters (probably no time to play around with them), it's at nite, so i'll probably need a fast flash recharge (throw in the flash pack). 95% unlikely that i'll take close-ups or very distant shots, so forget the extension tubes & teleconverters. there's gonna be fireworks, so no choice but lug along the tripod & cable release. and so on... after a few more shoots, you should be able to judge what you need and don't. for yourself, e.g., consider, if you already have the 24-85 AFS, do you need a fast 50mm lens? wouldn't the telezoom cover the range you need?

    IMHO a external flash is a important accessory, even if it's outdoors. you never know when light conditions change and you need to boost lighting, or if you need to fill-flash for harsh lighting.

    that's my take on the "packing" issue. i'm sure others will have their own system. of course there's always the 'kiasu' mentality of bringing everything "just in case" you need it, but after a while (and a lot of backpains and shoulder aches later), i wised up and dropped the stuff that i wouldn't need 95% of the time.

    hope my 2 cents help.

  4. #4

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    Originally posted by Larry
    for me, i have a "basic" kit that i bring everywhere (SLR, 2 lens, film, flash + omni-bounce, etc), then i access the shoot and decide what extra stuff + niceties to bring (filters, tripod, teleconverters, extension tubes, flash battery pack, etc). my basic kit should cover about 80% of the stuff i shoot, and the 20% depends on occasion.

    for example, like the Esplanade opening, i know i'll be shooting people and performers, so can forget the filters (probably no time to play around with them), it's at nite, so i'll probably need a fast flash recharge (throw in the flash pack). 95% unlikely that i'll take close-ups or very distant shots, so forget the extension tubes & teleconverters. there's gonna be fireworks, so no choice but lug along the tripod & cable release. and so on... after a few more shoots, you should be able to judge what you need and don't. for yourself, e.g., consider, if you already have the 24-85 AFS, do you need a fast 50mm lens? wouldn't the telezoom cover the range you need?

    IMHO a external flash is a important accessory, even if it's outdoors. you never know when light conditions change and you need to boost lighting, or if you need to fill-flash for harsh lighting.

    that's my take on the "packing" issue. i'm sure others will have their own system. of course there's always the 'kiasu' mentality of bringing everything "just in case" you need it, but after a while (and a lot of backpains and shoulder aches later), i wised up and dropped the stuff that i wouldn't need 95% of the time.

    hope my 2 cents help.
    Thanks a lot, AdamGoi, and Larry!
    Actually, I brought the 50mm along cuz I thought i needed it for some low light shoots... So I brought it along.
    But I only used it a few times (in the hall)....

    But just to ask, I generally take architecture and protraits mostly.. But I find that my AF-S is kinda slow to take portraits with available ligh indoorst... IMO, I kinda hate harsh lighting. Maybe I should use some bounce flash technique or something...

    Then whenever I want to take architecture, I have to change back into the AF-S again.. argh.

    I think I get kinda kan cheong sometimes to get a shoot...

    For example, there was a group shot just now outdoors under a tree, but with bright lighting... I couldn't set my flash (too bright), as I think I forgot to change to center weighted.... I'm not sure if the faces will be properly exposed or not...

    I think i should plan my photoshoots better when I go out for another photoshoot... But lol, my next shoot will not be sometime soon...

  5. #5
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    Originally posted by SNAG
    I think I get kinda kan cheong sometimes to get a shoot...
    don't kan cheong!!! relax!!! the more your panic, the worse it gets. personally for this kinda occasion, i mount my 24-85 (which covers 95% of the FL i need) and flash with omni-bounce (to compensate for bad lighting). works for me. i was like you also last time, always lug around a 50mm 1.8 but after a while, got lazy.

    for you, what you can experiment with is to tape a white card onto the SB22 to soften the flash. similar effect as a omni-bounce.

    don't worry, after a few more shoots, you'll develop a system for yourself that works.

    happy shooting!!!

  6. #6

    Default

    Originally posted by Larry
    don't kan cheong!!! relax!!! the more your panic, the worse it gets. personally for this kinda occasion, i mount my 24-85 (which covers 95% of the FL i need) and flash with omni-bounce (to compensate for bad lighting). works for me. i was like you also last time, always lug around a 50mm 1.8 but after a while, got lazy.

    for you, what you can experiment with is to tape a white card onto the SB22 to soften the flash. similar effect as a omni-bounce.

    don't worry, after a few more shoots, you'll develop a system for yourself that works.

    happy shooting!!!
    Thanks a lot!
    Just to ask, you tape a white card directly on the flash or you use it as a bounce card?

    Actually, I use the wide-angle adapter on the flash itself....

    Thanks a lot anyway!

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by SNAG
    Just to ask, you tape a white card directly on the flash or you use it as a bounce card?
    both works actually... i think for SB22, tape directly over the flash would work better. a bit hard to use a bounce card cos it doesn't swivel...

  8. #8

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    Originally posted by Larry
    both works actually... i think for SB22, tape directly over the flash would work better. a bit hard to use a bounce card cos it doesn't swivel...
    Sorry, I forgot to ask this question:

    What kind of white card should I use?
    it definitely cannot be totally opaque right?

  9. #9
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    i like to take anything i find that is nice...

  10. #10

    Default Re: How do you plan your photoshoots?

    Originally posted by SNAG
    Hi there.... I did my very first debut 'photoshoot' today in school.
    Just to ask, how do you guys actually plan on what to bring along when you guys go on a photoshoot?

    Cause i actually brought along some stuff that i didn't need... (like a external flash, as all shots were done outdoors...)

    And my camera was being treated so appallingly that some idiot actually placed my camera on the road.... kerna scuff marks liao..


    This was what I brought:
    Tripod
    my F80, sb22s, 50mm f/1.8 and 24 - 85 AF-S


    Please advise me on this..
    Thanks a lot!
    know what you want to focus, such as theme ... be familiar with your camera functions ... use them in a split of second to capture expression, objects etc ... a little more time devoted to objects that require attention and expertise ... think simple and creativity , act naturally , stay cool, be alert and sensitive .. the rest is your camera skills

  11. #11
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    Originally posted by SNAG
    What kind of white card should I use?
    it definitely cannot be totally opaque right?
    normal A4 printing paper should be fine, folded number of times as per your shooting preference. ok it looks crummy and cheapo, but it works so who cares?

  12. #12

    Default Re: How do you plan your photoshoots?

    Originally posted by SNAG

    And my camera was being treated so appallingly that some idiot actually placed my camera on the road.... kerna scuff marks liao..

    Hehe, don't cry, don't cry. *passes you a lollipop*


    This was what I brought:
    Tripod
    my F80, sb22s, 50mm f/1.8 and 24 - 85 AF-S
    Hey, it's not a lot of stuff, don't sweat it. But generally you should hvae an idea of what you want to shoot before you set off. Experience will tell you what to bring, and well, there's only one way to get experience!

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